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Old 06-07-2009, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
28,400 posts, read 48,166,922 times
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Families creating hamlets in less-crowded Colorado and Montana

WESTCLIFFE, Colo. - A new road sign cautions drivers to watch for Amish horse-drawn carriages in the valley beneath Colorado's Sangre de Cristo mountains. Highway pull-offs and dedicated horse-and-buggy paths are in the works.

Amish migrating West for cheaper land - Life- msnbc.com
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Old 06-07-2009, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Amish and Mennonites seek out low priced decent farmland. They know what they are doing.
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Old 06-07-2009, 08:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Amish and Mennonites seek out low priced decent farmland. They know what they are doing.
Good luck to them! Colorado is the most expensive mountain state to live in.
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Old 06-07-2009, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
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according to the article from the OP link, land price about $1400 per acre in Colorado, they could buy land in Maine for half of the price.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MinuteMan View Post
Good luck to them! Colorado is the most expensive mountain state to live in.
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Old 06-07-2009, 07:35 PM
 
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--" Yoder"---sure is a popular Amish name.
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Old 06-08-2009, 03:50 AM
 
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I can't imagine why ... Colorado farmland is expensive, the soils and climate aren't anywhere near as productive as the land in places like Ohio where they are presently located, and the farmland in Ohio is much less expensive.

Having just returned from a trip to Wooster and Kidron, OH ... and having seen 1st cut alfalfa on dryland, with expectations of 4-5 cuts this year without any irrigation ... it defies reason why somebody would prefer Colorado's limited water, growing season, and less productive soils. It's a lot more difficult to farm and raise livestock in Colorado, and then you've got the issues of getting your products to market when you're horse-drawn instead of using powered vehicles. Even the Amish have to sell what they produce to generate income ....

I'd guess that they have a Mennonite community in the area already, so that a lot of the transportation and communication issues are already being taken care of by their "cousins". I do know that the climate is much harsher in the Colorado mountains than in the rolling hills of Ohio ....

Last edited by sunsprit; 06-08-2009 at 03:58 AM..
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:10 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,802 times
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They did a story in the paper of why the Amish are moving to Maine and they freely admit that it was the last place they wanted to come. But their numbers are exploding and their way of life requires some vast acreage...they need to go where they can.

Last year there was a lot of Amish hatred. They went to every landowner who had over 1000 acres and asked if they would sell. This created this hysteria, with half the people all lathered up thinking their farms were worth millions, while the active farmers were scared that the farmland we lease which we require to provide feed for our cows, was at risk. At one point last year many of us would have shot a horse out from under an Amish if push came to shove.

But they were just feeling the area out. Ultimately they bought a few thousand acres west of us and seem to be content to just stay there. We get along with them now, but for awhile there, we were a bit threatened by them.

On a personal level, it was both flattering and threatening to me. They showed up one Sunday morning, pulling up in a van as 14 woman in bonnets, and men with whiskers got out to talk to me. I thought it was a mob hit for a moment. One of the elders did all the talking and asked how many arable acres I had, how much woodland, etc. I told them as it is public information anyway, but despite their lucrative offer, I declined.

This farm is not for sale. Not in my lifetime. (13th consecutive generations of farming heritage here).
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Old 06-08-2009, 06:04 PM
 
Location: NOCO
535 posts, read 1,408,699 times
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I wonder if it would be cheaper in CO. The land may be cheaper per acre, but it takes more acres to be productive. For example, in penn, 1 acre can pretty much feed a cow. Out in CO it takes about 60. If they planned on farming, it would be rough going. It would take some adaptation.
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Old 06-08-2009, 09:53 PM
 
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My understanding is CO has no puppymill laws whereas PA does (the gov. passed some new strong laws), that may be why they're migrating there.
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,538,452 times
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Once they discover that the State of Colorado claims ownership of ALL water, including rainwater (it is illegal in CO to have rain barrels) they might rethink their plan.

I was told last year that folks 'round here annually buy their fall freezer chickens from "the Amish farm"; whole cases of them. I haven't found out where it is yet, but apparently they have been here for years and do very well.

I don't mind them; I used to go to their little towns in OH when I lived there. Nice hardworking folk who made the best danged cheese I'd ever eaten - in big copper kettles. I may be going to Hell because I use zippers and electricity, but that doesn't mean I can't admire their work ethic or their simple life.
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