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Old 09-09-2009, 12:23 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
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So would it be a waste to invest in a pressure cooker if I could use a pressure canner both as I would a pressure cooker as well as to can?
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Old 09-10-2009, 11:16 PM
 
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Great thread! What is the difference between a "pressure cooker" and a "pressure canner, if there is a difference?" This has always confused me and still does. Thanks.
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Old 09-13-2009, 01:21 AM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opelske View Post
Great thread! What is the difference between a "pressure cooker" and a "pressure canner, if there is a difference?" This has always confused me and still does. Thanks.
Yes, there is a big difference. A pressure cooker CANNOT be used to safely process food when you can it. A Pressure Canner must be used when processing certain canned goods. I have never done this, but several friends that have pressure canners said it can double as a pressure cooker, but never vice versa.

Many universities have extension offices in the surrounding counties. You can find some great info about canning safety.

http://www.foodsafety.wisc.edu/consu...randcooker.pdf
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Old 09-13-2009, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
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Default Pressure cooker vs Pressure canner

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Originally Posted by cobolt View Post
So would it be a waste to invest in a pressure cooker if I could use a pressure canner both as I would a pressure cooker as well as to can?

The biggest differences you're going to find between a pressure cooker and a pressure canner are size and the presence of a pressure guage (a pressurized dial on top of the lid). Most pressure "cookers" are too small to put jars in for canning and do not have this dial on top which allows you to ensure that your canner is maintaining the proper pressure (temperature). I never advocate the use of a pressure canner which does not have this pressure dial, nor do I advocate the use of one with simply a "rocker gauge". There are sites out there which could probably explain it better than I can. LOL

To address your question though, if you're going to pick up a pressure canner, you do not have to also buy a pressure cooker. If you purchase a new canner, it should come with a booklet that has many recipes in it. In that book, it SHOULD have recipes for pressure cooking foods and the timetables and pressures recommended to do so. Again, a big difference is the versatility and size. Also.... as we've discussed previously, your pressure canner is also perfectly suitable (if large/deep enough), to use as a hot water bath....processing foods that are higher in acid content and do not require the higher temperature of a pressure canner. You simply fill the pressure canner with enough water to cover the jars and don't lock down the lid or close the petcock.
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Old 09-14-2009, 05:47 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,350 posts, read 10,939,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
The biggest differences you're going to find between a pressure cooker and a pressure canner are size and the presence of a pressure guage (a pressurized dial on top of the lid). Most pressure "cookers" are too small to put jars in for canning and do not have this dial on top which allows you to ensure that your canner is maintaining the proper pressure (temperature). I never advocate the use of a pressure canner which does not have this pressure dial, nor do I advocate the use of one with simply a "rocker gauge". There are sites out there which could probably explain it better than I can. LOL

To address your question though, if you're going to pick up a pressure canner, you do not have to also buy a pressure cooker. If you purchase a new canner, it should come with a booklet that has many recipes in it. In that book, it SHOULD have recipes for pressure cooking foods and the timetables and pressures recommended to do so. Again, a big difference is the versatility and size. Also.... as we've discussed previously, your pressure canner is also perfectly suitable (if large/deep enough), to use as a hot water bath....processing foods that are higher in acid content and do not require the higher temperature of a pressure canner. You simply fill the pressure canner with enough water to cover the jars and don't lock down the lid or close the petcock.
So what would be the best possible solution for my case? It's just me, so it's not like I need to cook big batches of food for the pressure cooker, but I would like to can several jars. I know if I purchased a pressure canner, and as you say, it's the size and versatility that's that difference, are there attachments or accessories that would allow me to cook smaller batches or would it just be better for me to purchase a smaller pressure cooker and then a pressure canner as well? I didn't want to buy both, but it looks like I may have to. the 8 quart pressure cooker seems just like my size, but I know that won't work for canning.
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Old 09-14-2009, 09:23 PM
 
218 posts, read 708,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cobolt View Post
So what would be the best possible solution for my case? It's just me, so it's not like I need to cook big batches of food for the pressure cooker, but I would like to can several jars. I know if I purchased a pressure canner, and as you say, it's the size and versatility that's that difference, are there attachments or accessories that would allow me to cook smaller batches or would it just be better for me to purchase a smaller pressure cooker and then a pressure canner as well? I didn't want to buy both, but it looks like I may have to. the 8 quart pressure cooker seems just like my size, but I know that won't work for canning.
I'm brand new to canning this year and have only been doing water bath canning to test the waters. I didn't purchase a waterbath canner, I've just been using pots I already had (one is 8qt and the other is 16 qt). I have to do smaller batches because of the smaller pot size but they work just fine.

They make 8 qt pressure canners so I don't see why you couldn't get a small canner that would double as a cooker if you are willing to can in smaller batches.
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Old 09-14-2009, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Elkhart, IN
311 posts, read 837,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johninvegas View Post
Does anyone have a favorite book or website on canning veggies and fruits at home? I've never done it myself, but would like to try canning some green beans and corn, maybe some plums, this year. Thanks!
I have had this book for 2 years and I LOVE IT.
Amazon.com: The Complete Book of Small-Batch Preserving: Over 300 Recipes to Use Year-Round (9781554072569): Ellie Topp, Margaret Howard: Books

I highly recommend using a pressure canner for doing most canning. I use a pressure canner for doing green beans mainly. I freeze corn, peaches, blueberries, applesauce and sometimes tomato sauce as well. I use hot water bath for doing my tomato sauces, pickles, etc. Because of the high acid content in these foods, they hot water bath fairly quickly and easily.

If you are going to be doing large batches...the pressure canner is the way to go. Since I am single I tend to use small batches and they are just as easy for the most part to either freeze or hot water bath.

Good Luck...it takes some effort..but SO WORTH it
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