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Old 06-13-2009, 12:24 PM
 
50 posts, read 108,396 times
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i want to move to a rural area. i have narrowed it down to three states and certain places in those states.

north dakota
nebreska
connecticut

i will most likely like to live in the in the western or northwestern area of the three states.

i was thinking like the panhandle area of nebraska. divide county and counties close by for north dakota, like by williston, nd. and Litchfield County, Connecticut.

thanks.
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Old 06-14-2009, 07:14 AM
 
13,655 posts, read 26,082,744 times
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I don't know what your plans are for your rural life- retirement? Self-sufficiency? But Connecticut has no relation to N. Dakota or Nebraska. Costs are very very high. That part of Connecticut is sort of hitched to the upscale mountain areas of western Mass., a conduit for NYC summer people. It looks rural, and is, in many ways, but it's an expensive place to live.
If you need a job in these areas, that's a whole 'nother thing. I suspect you could get some good info on the state-specific c-d sites.
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Old 06-14-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: South Dakota
733 posts, read 4,246,193 times
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There's nothing but rural in NW NE and ND. Have you ever been out here? Do you have any idea about the difference between "rural" Connecticut and the Great Plains?
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Old 06-14-2009, 06:04 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,159,422 times
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I came home from the railroad one time and a guy was saying how he was from Nebraska, but I had probably never heard of the town before. I told him I had been all over that state and probably had. That was when he said he was from Chadron....

I had flown out of Scottsbluff so I had been in that very town two weeks before.

Incidentally I am probably one of 3 people who has flown into Thedford Nebraska. There was a derail in that town and they needed a welder their ASAP...

I get to Denver airport and I am waiting to fly into Thedford and all these other people come and go, so a flight attendant asked me where I was headed so I told her. She said, "oh your the one." A few minutes later two fly boys who looked to be 20 years older told me to "grab my sh$%t and throw them in the plane." It was a single engine plane and I think we had it maxed out. Anyway we landed into Thedford on what was then a grass strip, but it might be pave now ???

All in all I spent many years in Nebraska railroading...perhaps in another lifetime I would make Alliance my home.
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Old 06-15-2009, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Sandhills
2,177 posts, read 3,210,571 times
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The Pine Ridge area of Nebraska is a very nice place. Located in the northwest area of the panhandle. Not sure on what you are thinking of doing as a work, that maybe your only problem. I suggest hitting up some of the area chamber of commerces there for more info.

Good Luck
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Old 06-20-2009, 03:30 PM
 
Location: South Dakota
733 posts, read 4,246,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
Incidentally I am probably one of 3 people who has flown into Thedford Nebraska. There was a derail in that town and they needed a welder their ASAP...
Hey, I was just in Thedford 3 weeks ago coming back home from business in west central NE. There's a nice little park on the west end of town...shady and good for taking a break from the road. As to flying in...never had the money for lessons or a plane, but it would be a lot more convenient than all the windshield time!
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Old 06-26-2009, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,538,436 times
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I liked western Nebraska a lot when I visited there. I've driven from Hot Springs, South Dakota to Sterling, Colorado, and covered a portion of the Nebraska panhandle along the way (Hwy. 385 through Chadron, Alliance, and Sidney). I have also since returned and visited Scottsbluff, traveling there from Wyoming. Since Nebraska borders eastern Wyoming (where I have property), it is very similar. The prairie is beautiful in many ways, but my calling has always been the mountains. My property is very close to the base of Laramie Peak in eastern Wyoming, but is only about 100 miles from Scottsbluff. To me, the area where my property is offers the perfect blend of usable land, pine trees, mountains, and prairie. Since it lies at the point where the Rockies flatten out onto the plains, I have a bit of both there. The other reason I prefer Wyoming over Nebraska is that it seems to offer better tax advantages (i.e. no state income tax).

Getting back to western Nebraska, I would move there as quickly as I could if the right property was available at the right price, even though it's not my first choice of places to live.
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Old 06-26-2009, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,151 posts, read 50,336,736 times
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I have spent a lot of time in Ct, and I own property in Ct. We were once very active in 4H and elbows with families from the Litchfield area. While it is 'rural' in a sense, and family farms have been there for centuries, and folks there would be very cross with anyone saying different.

It is in no way 'rural' like the rural areas of the nation are.

Property values are high, property taxes are high, and the cost-of-living is high.

And you are only a very short drive into urban areas with extremely high population-densities.

Dairies do exist, cows can be seen, and there are greenhouse farms that do produce a great deal of veggies.

But it is not what I would consider to be rural.

Also, when one single state contains a couple urban metro areas and a few scattered 'rural' areas, consider the state's politics.

95% of the voting population will be urban with urban mindsets [high crime, high demand for municipal services].

4.999% of the voting population might be people in the suburban sprawl border-line communities, that live off the metro pulse but are glad to own homes outside of the city.

0.001% of the voting population might be farmers, either tending his cows and working in a greenhouse.

Now when the state passes a new law, or raises a tax; do you think that it will be with the farmer in mind? No.

When an issue comes to a popular vote, the masses of people living in the cities will always carry the vote.

For example: If the masses say that they want to end animal cruelty, so for every pound an animal has in body weight, it must also have 1,000 sq foot of living space. They do such a vote without consideration for the farmer who has cows.

There is a huge difference between the rural areas of a mostly rural state; and the 'rural' areas of a mostly urban state.
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Old 07-15-2009, 06:05 PM
 
20 posts, read 83,861 times
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Rural Northeastern Connecticut is called the "quiet corner". We are within an hour's drive of Hartford, Boston, and Providence. Lots of foreclosures available (unfortunately) but still a wonderful place to live.
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Old 07-15-2009, 06:56 PM
 
Location: The brown house on the cul de sac
2,081 posts, read 4,294,743 times
Reputation: 9305
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpcp View Post
i want to move to a rural area. i have narrowed it down to three states and certain places in those states.

north dakota
nebreska
connecticut

i will most likely like to live in the in the western or northwestern area of the three states.

i was thinking like the panhandle area of nebraska. divide county and counties close by for north dakota, like by williston, nd. and Litchfield County, Connecticut.

thanks.
I live in CT and love our rural towns. CT is incredibly beautiful. However, I am going to agree with Forest Beekeeper (sorry, Forest, can't rep you again until I spread some more) about our rural areas. No comparison to Nebraska and North Dakota that truly have rural areas. We are a small state and any rural town here is near suburbia and that does affect the feel of rurality! Litchfield County is gorgeous and fantastic to live. But, if you are moving here to "get away from it all" I would look very carefully. Although, CT is expensive I think it is a fantastic state with incredible beauty. Let us know where you decide! Good luck!
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