U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-17-2009, 12:09 PM
 
Location: A little suburb of Houston
3,702 posts, read 16,502,997 times
Reputation: 2065

Advertisements

Don't about wild hogs (yes we have them too) but we have a serious problem with feral pigs in this area. BTW, this area is urban and industrial. They tear up plants something fierce. Can't shoot them because of proximity to the chemical plants and residences so traps are set out and the meat is donated to homeless shelters. Problem is the population can quickly outstrip the trappers ability to catch them. Have to trap deer every so often too, these are relocated elsewhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-17-2009, 05:19 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,432 posts, read 43,279,509 times
Reputation: 44078
I think it was Field and Stream that had an article about the spread of feral pigs a couple years ago. The wildlife scientists that were quoted estimated that all the lower 48 states would have a population by, I think, 2015 or 2020. They need to be hunted immediately, we don't have them in MD but I've been in areas where they are and they are devastating to native wildlife and environment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2009, 06:03 PM
 
28 posts, read 47,200 times
Reputation: 48
Feral pigs and wild boars are the same thing.

Feral Pig Fact Sheet - WDNR

Quote:
Feral pigs (Sus scrofa), also known as wild pigs, wild hogs, wild boars, European wild boars, Russian wild boars, or razorbacks, are rangy-looking non-native members of the domestic swine family, Suidae. These transplants native to Europe and Asia are aggressive mammals posing serious ecological, economic, aesthetic, medical and veterinary threats. Feral pigs have recently been sighted in Wisconsin and they have worn out their welcome.
They sure are mean looking. I read that the pigs in the USA that are wild are becoming more aggressive as they breed with other wild pigs. I read something about an Asian/European wild boar cross that is breeding out of control. If you see some with light colored stripes on its back those are the more dangerous ones.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2009, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Sandhills
2,177 posts, read 3,208,256 times
Reputation: 2747
I do believe the one in the photo above has laid some claim to photoshop and size misrepresented as a wild boar, it actually was a domestic hog raised and then released on a game farm.

In my home state of Nebraska, our Game & Parks takes a position to remove any feral hogs that are reported.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2009, 03:06 PM
 
Location: The D-M-V area
13,698 posts, read 15,855,332 times
Reputation: 9534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandhills Guru View Post
I do believe the one in the photo above has laid some claim to photoshop and size misrepresented as a wild boar, it actually was a domestic hog raised and then released on a game farm.

In my home state of Nebraska, our Game & Parks takes a position to remove any feral hogs that are reported.


This one was in Florida. This one has tusks, domestic pigs don't have tusks.

http://www.wildboarusa.com/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2009, 03:46 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,136 posts, read 19,291,916 times
Reputation: 25168
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyGem View Post

This one was in Florida. This one has tusks, domestic pigs don't have tusks.

Wild Boar USA Magazine
Okay now that is a big pig !!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2009, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,531 posts, read 55,444,914 times
Reputation: 32228
The Georgia wild boar that was huge was a sensation a while back. It was eventually confirmed by digging up the remains.

That said, I live in north AL in the country. I have seen rabbits (about an hour ago), deer (yesterday evening), foxes (last month), and coyotes (this past winter). I've not seen any wild pigs or signs of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2009, 07:52 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,444 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
Okay now that is a big pig !!!
My ex-wife was bigger (LOL)

All kidding aside it must be a big problem. I noticed Tractor Supply carries Boar Hunter, a magazine dedicated to hunting wild boar at their stores. I would think that if there is a magazine for it, there is a serious market of boar hunters in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2009, 09:03 AM
 
1,255 posts, read 2,806,428 times
Reputation: 957
There is some in the wild around here but I haven't found them yea.Do go to Game ranch every year hunt them.











hillman
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2009, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,308 posts, read 34,854,238 times
Reputation: 7103
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyGem View Post
I think it's very interesting that there are packs of wild pigs running around tearing up the countryside!

With all the hunters with gun licenses why aren't they out there shooting those boars?

From what I understand they all have a target on their heads from Fish and Game! Go huntin'!
Depending on where you are you shouldn't need a gun license (or any license for that matter) to kill wild hogs. They are on the "At any time, by any means" list. There is a serious and concerted effort to not just hunt but eradicate wild hogs.

The problem is that they are very clever and adaptible animals, they recognize hunting patterns and become very difficult to find when subjected to hunting pressure and they reproduce extremely quickly. A sow reaches reproductive age at about 8 months and can whelp 1,000 piglets by the age of 5. If you have an established population on your land, they can reproduce faster than a single landowner with a rifle can kill them.

The primary areas of infestation are Texas and the Southeastern states, but they have spread as far north as Canada.

The picture in the OP is a world record feral hog, but it was a the result of a "canned hunt", if you will. Far more typical are boars between 300 and 600 lbs. and sows in the 150 lb. range (that guy in the picture was around 1,500 lbs.).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:15 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top