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Old 06-20-2009, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,957,890 times
Reputation: 4611

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Life is a challenge, and if your not willing to compete you might as well make future plans of being dependent on others.
It's a matter of learning self-disipline and responsibility along with survival-of-the-fitist.
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Old 06-20-2009, 06:35 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
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The county extension office gives good ,practical, advice on this topic via our local farm radio station.

They state kids want to help on a --farm--at a very young age and should be given tasks to do.

Their key word was to keep those tasks--"age appropriate"-- with safety in mind.
There is a dairy newspaper in our area ( Dairy Star) that every issue interviews a farm families kids and asks them what their tasks are on the farm.

Many times it is a family with 5 kids ranging in ages from 5-17.
It is heartening to read that the vast majority of farmers do already follow the county agents advice as the youngest ones talk about feeding baby calves bottles in the calf hutches and the older ones talk about operating machinery and milking cows.

age appropriate=common sense
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Old 06-20-2009, 06:41 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
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I have given my kids tractor rides with them sitting in my lap, but only when the sole purpose is to give a tractor ride.

When I am operating a tractor doing actual work, no one will be riding with me.

There is a reason tractor manufacturers only installed one seat on a tractor.
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Old 06-20-2009, 06:42 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
I've mentioned that i was raised on a dairy farm. My brother and I, i think he was 8 and i was 7, we had an old 57 Plymouth parked out by the lane so we could drive around and check the fences or just drive it out and go skinny dippin' in the creek running across the north pasture.

We had a John Deere 10-10 and a crank start Farmall. There's been many times that I've been knock down by the kick-back of the crank starter. Even as a kid, that just told me that the engine had good compression
That is too funny. WE had a JD 10 10 dozer as a kid and I got my first "moving violation" at age 9. We own both sides of the road so when I needed to get from one side to the other, I drove the bulldozer across. One day I saw a cop sitting at the entrance of this dirt road and figured he would not stop a 9 year old kid...boy was I wrong by that 110 dollar ticket. My first.
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Old 06-20-2009, 07:20 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
That is too funny. WE had a JD 10 10 dozer as a kid and I got my first "moving violation" at age 9. We own both sides of the road so when I needed to get from one side to the other, I drove the bulldozer across. One day I saw a cop sitting at the entrance of this dirt road and figured he would not stop a 9 year old kid...boy was I wrong by that 110 dollar ticket. My first.
Despite seeing a cop,you crossed a public road with a dozer anyway ?

I think that ticket was given for stupidity.

Kinda proves my point about--"age appropriate"
An older operator would have known that cop ain't gonna sit there all day in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 06-20-2009, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,957,890 times
Reputation: 4611
For some reason, back then, I liked the looks of the (gray and red) ford tractors.. maybe because it was a 4 wheeler and both of ours were 3,

Last edited by mkfarnam; 06-20-2009 at 08:34 AM..
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Old 06-20-2009, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,480 posts, read 38,390,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
I got into a fearsome debate on another forum with some city folks who insisted that children must be protected from the big bad old world. Their kids had helmets, knee pads, shin pads, and elbow pads for bike riding, and weren't even allowed to play tag or kickball on the playground unless it was an organized and supervised activity.

One of the kids at our high school where I work now entered the local rodeo in the bull-riding competition, the barrel-racing, and the pole racing competition this year. Her horse decided half way through the barrels to bow up and buck her off. She hung on right up until her chest hit the saddle horn and knocked the breath out of her, and she fell off. It took her a minute to get up, even with help. A half hour later, she was back out there for the pole racing - on the same horse. THIS time when he started his crap, she yanked him down to a standstill and made him finish. And she won both that and the bull-riding competition! Everyone around her said - "There ain't no quit in her!" And there isn't. She is a quiet, hardworking, proud young lady. I guarantee nothing will ever stop her from getting what she wants. She earned those two gold buckles!

Yes the world is dangerous. Yes you can die. But if you don't, you learn from it, gain self-confidence and abilities at an early age, and are better able to handle the changing world around you when you are a grownup. Far more so than any mollycoddled, padded, helmeted little whiner who is afraid of his own shadow, who gets a prize just for showing up and breathing.
I tried to give you rep for this excellent post (especially the last paragraph), but CD won't let me until I spread some around. Well said!

Though my first question, as an experienced horsewoman, in such a situation as you describe, especially if the horse did the same thing again, would be, "What's hurting the horse?" Every time I've seen that happen with a horse that doesn't usually do it (and I doubt she'd take him to a competition if it did usually happen), and asked that question, sooner or later there turns out to be something that's hurting the horse about a specific action, be it something wrong with the horse or wrong with the tack, and he's trying to communicate that in the only way he has. Sure hope she found out what it was after the competition.
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
Reputation: 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny
I got into a fearsome debate on another forum with some city folks who insisted that children must be protected from the big bad old world. Their kids had helmets, knee pads, shin pads, and elbow pads for bike riding, and weren't even allowed to play tag or kickball on the playground unless it was an organized and supervised activity.

One of the kids at our high school where I work now entered the local rodeo in the bull-riding competition, the barrel-racing, and the pole racing competition this year. Her horse decided half way through the barrels to bow up and buck her off. She hung on right up until her chest hit the saddle horn and knocked the breath out of her, and she fell off. It took her a minute to get up, even with help. A half hour later, she was back out there for the pole racing - on the same horse. THIS time when he started his crap, she yanked him down to a standstill and made him finish. And she won both that and the bull-riding competition! Everyone around her said - "There ain't no quit in her!" And there isn't. She is a quiet, hardworking, proud young lady. I guarantee nothing will ever stop her from getting what she wants. She earned those two gold buckles!

Yes the world is dangerous. Yes you can die. But if you don't, you learn from it, gain self-confidence and abilities at an early age, and are better able to handle the changing world around you when you are a grownup. Far more so than any mollycoddled, padded, helmeted little whiner who is afraid of his own shadow, who gets a prize just for showing up and breathing.
Wonderful post!
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
Reputation: 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap
That is too funny. WE had a JD 10 10 dozer as a kid and I got my first "moving violation" at age 9. We own both sides of the road so when I needed to get from one side to the other, I drove the bulldozer across. One day I saw a cop sitting at the entrance of this dirt road and figured he would not stop a 9 year old kid...boy was I wrong by that 110 dollar ticket. My first.
When I was a kid, we had 16 acres of almond orchard and we share-cropped another 30 acres. During harvest we filled a lot of trailers in fast sequence and had to get them to the huller. Pick-up trucks pulling 2 trailers, and tractors pulling 3 trailers, all made the trip to the hullers place 10 miles away.

In that part of California, about a 20 mile stretch of freeway 99 became a 4-lane divided road with traffic lights. Starting when I was 12, I drove a tractor, pulling trailers back and forth, across the freeway because our huller was on the other side.

We never got any tickets.

20-years later they coughed up the money to put in over-passes, on-ramps and off-ramps, and made it all a regular freeway.
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
Reputation: 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac
Despite seeing a cop,you crossed a public road with a dozer anyway ?

I think that ticket was given for stupidity.

Kinda proves my point about--"age appropriate"
An older operator would have known that cop ain't gonna sit there all day in the middle of nowhere.
Respectfully, I would disagree.

I see many farms that straddle the road. My place straddles the road. Moving equipment from one side to the other is not a big deal.

If we had children here, my greater concern would be if they can safely handle the equipment when they are 'working' it. Not whether they can safely move the equipment from one side of the road to the other side.

Every child is taught how to cross the road in a safe manner. If they can not comprehend how to safely cross a road, then you have far greater issues with that child.

You see caution signs everywhere warning drivers that up ahead is a farm that moves livestock or equipment across the road from time to time.

In my mind, moving equipment is a far lesser concern than if a person can handle that equipment when doing something with it. That goes for child or adult.

I am sure that any parent would have been supervising and watching long enough before hand to know that a child was mature enough to handle that equipment within the task.



Perhaps it is a cultural difference.

If a child was 'joy riding' or doing something inappropriate then by all means I can see a cop pulling him over.

When I was a child, doing 'work' was expected. It would not have occurred to us that a cop would have stopped us. A 'slow moving' triangle mounted on the vehicle, or else a red handkerchief flapping on the farthest extension, was all you needed.
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