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Old 06-20-2009, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
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Every child is taught how to cross the road in a safe manner. If they can not comprehend how to safely cross a road, then you have far greater issues with that child.

And those far greater issues exist whether the child is on a farm or ranch or in the city - except they'd be more of a hazard in the city due to more roads to cross.
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Old 06-20-2009, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady
Every child is taught how to cross the road in a safe manner. If they can not comprehend how to safely cross a road, then you have far greater issues with that child.

And those far greater issues exist whether the child is on a farm or ranch or in the city - except they'd be more of a hazard in the city due to more roads to cross.
Yes, sort of.

I too see far greater hazards in life in an urban environment.

However having been a foster-parent in three different urban areas, I do think that the urban environments come with far greater social services.

The higher cost-of-living and higher taxes; tend to provide a higher level of nanny-like services to serve and protect folks from themselves.

There will be many therapists, social workers, respite care providers, and institutions available in the urban landscape to handle the developmentally challenged among us.
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Old 06-20-2009, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,536,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Respectfully, I would disagree.

I see many farms that straddle the road. My place straddles the road. Moving equipment from one side to the other is not a big deal.

If we had children here, my greater concern would be if they can safely handle the equipment when they are 'working' it. Not whether they can safely move the equipment from one side of the road to the other side...

You see caution signs everywhere warning drivers that up ahead is a farm that moves livestock or equipment across the road from time to time.

In my mind, moving equipment is a far lesser concern than if a person can handle that equipment when doing something with it. That goes for child or adult... Perhaps it is a cultural difference.

If a child was 'joy riding' or doing something inappropriate then by all means I can see a cop pulling him over.

When I was a child, doing 'work' was expected. It would not have occurred to us that a cop would have stopped us. A 'slow moving' triangle mounted on the vehicle, or else a red handkerchief flapping on the farthest extension, was all you needed.
All very true. Once you drop the plow or other machinery, it is a lot harder to control than driving the tractor down or across an even or paved road.

Although around here there are NO caution signs for tractors or heavy equipment! Ranches take in thousands of acres and are on both sides of MANY roads; one assumes that one will come across anything, anywhere, at any point. The roads all have paved "suicide lanes" on the sides so that slow movers can pull over and stil keep moving without getting bogged down. Helps during blizzards too!

I still think that kids in the country are better off. Yes, you can do age specific things; but some children mature faster than others. I had to buy my kids toys that were appropriate for their MENTAL ages, because the ones that are "age specific" were already too boring for them. The more gradual responsibility you give a child, without worrying about arbitrary age guidelines, the better off they are. My oldest and dau can work on and fix any type of machinery - but we can't even let our middle child near a weedeater - at the tender age of 30.

Texas Horse Lady, I would tend to agree with you - except that gelding had been kept in grain all winter without exercise. He was just being a stinker... She went over the whole rig after the first incident, to be sure, though.. and then as well as when she resaddled and rode him outside of the ring, he was a kitten.
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Old 06-20-2009, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
Texas Horse Lady, I would tend to agree with you - except that gelding had been kept in grain all winter without exercise. He was just being a stinker... She went over the whole rig after the first incident, to be sure, though.. and then as well as when she resaddled and rode him outside of the ring, he was a kitten.
Well, the former would seem to be an indicator. The latter, though - I watched a stallion dump his rider at a show, twice in the same class (rider got back on and continued the class the first time, just to let him know that didn't get him out of work). Both times, he was a kitten outside the arena and inside the arena, except when asked to canter.

I asked the rider/owner the "what hurts" question, later. He said it was interesting, but it took a couple of months to find out that he was developing a problem (saddle related) that caused him pain at the start of the canter and at no other time. He tried indicating this to the rider, who didn't listen, and then when the rider didn't get it, he got "louder".
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Old 06-20-2009, 02:46 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Respectfully, I would disagree.

I see many farms that straddle the road. My place straddles the road. Moving equipment from one side to the other is not a big deal.

If we had children here, my greater concern would be if they can safely handle the equipment when they are 'working' it. Not whether they can safely move the equipment from one side of the road to the other side.

Every child is taught how to cross the road in a safe manner. If they can not comprehend how to safely cross a road, then you have far greater issues with that child.

You see caution signs everywhere warning drivers that up ahead is a farm that moves livestock or equipment across the road from time to time.

In my mind, moving equipment is a far lesser concern than if a person can handle that equipment when doing something with it. That goes for child or adult.

I am sure that any parent would have been supervising and watching long enough before hand to know that a child was mature enough to handle that equipment within the task.



Perhaps it is a cultural difference.

If a child was 'joy riding' or doing something inappropriate then by all means I can see a cop pulling him over.

When I was a child, doing 'work' was expected. It would not have occurred to us that a cop would have stopped us. A 'slow moving' triangle mounted on the vehicle, or else a red handkerchief flapping on the farthest extension, was all you needed.

I doubt BT got a ticket for driving w/o a license

I'll bet he got a ticket for driving a vehicle with tracks (dozer) across a public road.

Where I live, a dozer operator must lay plank down in order to drive across a public road with a dozer cuz the tracks on a dozer chew the hell out of a public road.

Comparing tractors and other rubber tired equipment crossing a public road with a dozer is comparing apples to oranges.
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Old 06-20-2009, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
I doubt BT got a ticket for driving w/o a license

I'll bet he got a ticket for driving a vehicle with tracks (dozer) across a public road.

Where I live, a dozer operator must lay plank down in order to drive across a public road with a dozer cuz the tracks on a dozer chew the hell out of a public road.

Comparing tractors and other rubber tired equipment crossing a public road with a dozer is comparing apples to oranges.
I see, forgive my ignorance.

When the contractors drove their dozer on the pavement in front of our home [taking it off the trailer as they were building my driveway] they tore the heck out of the pavement.

Thank you.
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Old 06-20-2009, 07:22 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,208 times
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Yeah you are right Marmac but you have never seen my road...I think that dozer smoothed it up! (LOL)

But I disagree with the rest of the stuff. I am a farmer and a dad and I have things I need to get done. It is not always safe, but I do a lot of work with my tractor with my daughter on my lap. Could something happen...sure but a day care center could burn down too.

I grew up riding on tractors since I was old enough to remember, and my father did as well. I always thought that was why they put fenders on a tractor anyway...as makeshift seats for the kids.

I will say in today's world they do put two seat in a cab and my daughter just loves to ride on the chopper all day. Here she is at 1½ years old taking her first tractor ride and yes we rode on it all day as it worked.
Attached Thumbnails
Do the Benefits outweigh the Dangers?-big-chopper-small.jpg  
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,962,646 times
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I think people are looking at different perspectives. some are picturing open seat farm tractors, when in actuality your refering to a cab-in, which IMO shouldn't have to be questioned for safety.
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Old 06-21-2009, 09:31 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
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Here is a good "lithmus test" for farm dafety.

If a farmer's wife divorced him and re-married another farmer-------would you be upset if they allowed all the same things on their farm when your children were visiting or living ?
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Old 06-23-2009, 05:52 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,208 times
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In your defense Marmac, he probably would be. We really allow our kids to do a bit too much at a young age.
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