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Old 07-30-2009, 11:22 PM
 
Location: NW. MO.
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I live in a small city in California of just over 2000 people. I've lived here before for a couple years actually next door to where I am now and this time I've lived here for almost 4 years. Generally speaking the people here are not friendly. I get along fine with the neighbors on my street besides one who I had an issue with, I know all the rest of them and we talk and we'd help them in any way we could. The rest of the town generally speaking is unpleasant (not all but generally). I don't even shop here if I can help it. Oddly just about 10 miles down the road is a more upscale smaller town full of people who are just more happy and a whole lot nicer to be around.

I wonder sometimes if it's is economics that make a place less or more pleasant.
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Old 08-02-2009, 01:40 PM
 
486 posts, read 924,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Size has nothing to do with it. ( IMHO)

I would say a city/town that has a higher percent of people re-locating there might be more friendly than a close knit town where 4 last names dominate the telephone listings and the rest are related thru marriage.
I agree 100%. When I've moved, the most open and friendly people were often those who hadn't lived in the area for their entire lives. In general then, I'd say high-growth 'destination' towns or cities. New people to an area are looking to meet new friends, etc, whereas those who've been in an area forever already have their own niche.
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Old 08-02-2009, 03:59 PM
 
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As much as I could not wait to leave South Florida (Weston/Pembroke Pines) the people were so friendly. Particularly in comparison to the surface civility here in Minneapolis.
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Old 08-03-2009, 04:30 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
411 posts, read 1,061,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by South Jersey Styx View Post
Yet the same cannot be said of NYC which has more people.
Ya, ppl in NYC are very nice.
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Old 08-03-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
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Maybe a lot of people in the DC area are just shy? I don't live in DC but I am very shy so when someone I don't know comes up to me and starts talking to me I don't really like it that much.
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Old 08-04-2009, 10:44 AM
 
Location: In the woods
3,315 posts, read 8,914,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City_boi View Post
Maybe a lot of people in the DC area are just shy?
No, they're workaholics, ambitious, and transient. And I'm not saying that in a totally negative way. There aren't ethnic neighborhoods (like the kind in NYC) with generations of folks (i.e., polish, irish, italian, puerto rican, etc.) which makes a big difference as far as building a sense of community.
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Old 08-04-2009, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Kansas
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It has nothing to do with size. Towns with diversity are your best bet if you are going to be living there - college, military, new businesses/companies having brought employees with them. Smaller towns are friendly to the people who live there and they might be friendly if you are spending money there but mostly they are suspicious of outsiders and sometimes after several years, they would accept you.
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Old 08-04-2009, 09:51 PM
 
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I haven't had much luck meeting people in small towns, I think the best place for friendliness would be those areas where the population is transient and everybody is "new" in town. A friend recently moved to the SW and found a lot of new friends due to the fact of the large population of retired folk's.

The country is changing rapidly, we don't get to know one another now because the TV and web keep people busy,"socializing". Big towns are just a compilation of neighborhoods, you can still be very "local" in the big cities, and , there are more oppertunities to socialize when you have a bigger population base.

All in all, I'd have to say, we are becoming more socially isolated, though the internet has taken up some of the social slack, we still have very little friendliness left in our culture. It's not that we are collectively in agreement with these changes, but, the change is here, and civility is now the most we can expect from others.
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Old 08-14-2009, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, Az (unfortunately still here)
2,550 posts, read 4,057,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by South Jersey Styx View Post
I lived in Northern VA (Fairfax and then dulles area, Loudoun Co) for over 20 yrs. People are just like that in that area -- rude, cold, and paranoid. Even worse, people do their best to avoid *touching* one another. For example, when one visits a store at the mall or elsewhere, people go out of the way to make sure they don't bump into you or get too close. It's kind of a weird thing. I am not sure exactly why but figured it was because it's a transient area, people work too much, it's overpopulated, they're angry at sitting in traffic too long, yadda, yadda. Yet the same cannot be said of NYC which has more people. Anyway . ..

I don't believe the size of the town really matters--it's the people. Have you visited some of the smaller towns on the western part of VA or even in WV? Historic towns such as Leesburg used to be small and quaint but now there are developments all over. So you'd have to go further out. Alot of the towns are still small but close enough to hospitals, shopping, etc. The scenary is beautiful because of the mountains. And wasn't one of the western counties in VA rated the Best County to Retire In recently? Best of luck in your search!

Northern VA sounds a lot like Prescott and Prescott Valley, Arizona. And some parts of Phoenix too! Mean, cold, and paranoid. And not to mention self-centered (a lot of people in Arizona, or Arizona natives, are self-centered!!).
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