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Old 08-06-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Democratic Peoples Republic of Redneckistan
11,102 posts, read 13,352,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
Kids in small towns in west Texas move to Lubbock and Amarillo. Kids in Lubbock move to Dallas or Houston and kids there move to New York City or LA. Change the name of the cities and it's been a fairly standard migration pattern for youthful Americans for many years. Many years ago I moved from a small town in New Mexico to New Orleans where I worked for several years in the French Quarter, then later to Washington D.C where I worked inside the Beltway for almost a decade. Now I live four miles outside a small west Texas town of 1200 people and love it. I think there were two cars and a tractor that passed in front of the house today. There were, however, two beautiful male ring-neck pheasants beside the barn this morning and a soaring Swainson's hawk above the pasture this afternoon. I have no quarrel with people who want to live in the city. If everyone loved country living there would be no rural America and I would not have 5 acres of pasture to mow tomorrow.
I'm with ya I'm GLAD there are millions of people who like living all herded together,leaves more room for me.....btw HPR,we may be seeing you in a few more years....when our kid graduates we are headed back down your way and are looking for the most off the beaten path house we can find down there....

Here the migration pattern is St.Louis,Indianapolis or Chicago and then back here when they retire.....by then they've got the "big city attitude".
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Old 08-06-2009, 12:01 PM
 
Location: St Louis County, MO
711 posts, read 1,887,271 times
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^ Im in leg 1 of that pattern, but I don't necessarily agree with it.

I bet 95% of the people I talk to in southern Illinois who come up to visit us, or even if they don't, talk about wanting to move to a city, but never will. Never will because they are afraid to leave their family, because of people who are afraid of the city, etc. However, the 5% that do move end up moving to an eastern suburb of St Louis, still in Illinois. This, I cannot explain...comfort I guess? No new license/license plates/tax rules, etc? Not sure. But I think most people that come from southern Illinois to the metro east end up in the metro east.

I broke the pattern by leaving southern Illinois, living in Fairview Heights for 8 months, then picking up and moving to the city. We will most likely never move farther away from southern Illinois than St Louis because that's where my family is and I like the fact that "visiting family" whether we go there or they come here is 2-3 times a month rather than once or twice a year.
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Old 08-06-2009, 02:56 PM
 
12,683 posts, read 17,008,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muleskinner View Post
I'm with ya I'm GLAD there are millions of people who like living all herded together,leaves more room for me.....btw HPR,we may be seeing you in a few more years....when our kid graduates we are headed back down your way and are looking for the most off the beaten path house we can find down there....

Here the migration pattern is St.Louis,Indianapolis or Chicago and then back here when they retire.....by then they've got the "big city attitude".
They are like modern chickens raised in cages on washed concrete. They don't know any better and lucky for us, they never will.

Best of luck on your future move. If you decide the Texas southern High Plains are something you would like to try, rest assured you will be very welcomed. Our new (old) rural place is REALLY off the beaten path being 26 miles to Plainview, Texas and about 35 to Lubbock. We have only 5 acres right now but hope to purchase an adjacent 15 acres in the very near future.
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Old 08-06-2009, 06:32 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,088 posts, read 22,602,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City_boi View Post
Ok, that's just gross and people anywhere wouldn't want to see their neighbor peeing in the front yard.
Well if I pee outside on my homestead in Alaska no one would be around to see it. LOL

To answer the OP: I hate cities. They are overcrowded, polluted, lack nature, have less freedom, and simply put, I can't do the things I enjoy in cities. I prefer as rural as possible, pure wilderness being my favorite.
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Old 08-06-2009, 06:52 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,088 posts, read 22,602,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
LMAO, those were the days my friend! The OP thinks this is weird. We used to be able to do that here, we just left our rifles or shotguns in our truck racks when we went to school. Funny, we never had a school shooting or any kind of problem. They have recently. Sign of the times? I don't know. Youth issues are not unique to either rural or urban settings. There's more people in the cities so, I guess we hear about their issues more. When something bad happens in the school here it takes about ten minutes before the whole valley knows, we don't have to wait for the paper to come out. There are plenty of druggies and lowlifes out here as well. Thats not specific to urban or rural settings either. We just know who they all are as opposed to them having a large population to get lost in. There have been a few labs busted out in the desert as well. Remote locations appeal to these cretins, but we don't tolerate them when we find them. Nobody has a bit of issue 'getting involved' and no one is scared of these idiots. They are nuts and they are dangerous, but so can we decent folks be as well. Our local SO is death on these clowns. Zero tolerance. It's not as easy to hide out here as the lab runners think it is. Something that is out of place gets noticed. Another benefit of the open spaces. Rural life is not what I grew up with these days. No place is immune from the problems and we don't blame the city folks for the stuff popping up out here. I will go out on a limb and say that our plugged in way of life has something to do with some of the issues. We are not so isolated from such things as we used to be, my sitting at this laptop is proof enough of that. Here I am, in the middle of the desert, talking with folks from all over the place. urban rural and everywhere in between. Plugged in indeed.............
It's still legal here, technically, to do that (for high school kids to leave their hunting guns in their vehicles, the law allows firearms on school grounds if there's no intent to commit a crime, but not in the school buildings or school owned vehicles). But so many flatlanders from, as we call them here, have moved in and they freak out about it and have gotten a lot of schools to make policies against it (which aren't criminal matters but can screw up a kid over nothing harmful).
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Old 08-06-2009, 06:56 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,088 posts, read 22,602,664 times
Reputation: 9373
Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
Kids in small towns in west Texas move to Lubbock and Amarillo. Kids in Lubbock move to Dallas or Houston and kids there move to New York City or LA. Change the name of the cities and it's been a fairly standard migration pattern for youthful Americans for many years. Many years ago I moved from a small town in New Mexico to New Orleans where I worked for several years in the French Quarter, then later to Washington D.C where I worked inside the Beltway for almost a decade. Now I live four miles outside a small west Texas town of 1200 people and love it. I think there were two cars and a tractor that passed in front of the house today. There were, however, two beautiful male ring-neck pheasants beside the barn this morning and a soaring Swainson's hawk above the pasture this afternoon. I have no quarrel with people who want to live in the city. If everyone loved country living there would be no rural America and I would not have 5 acres of pasture to mow tomorrow.
True, but it seems quite a few young people will come back to a more rural place if they decide to raise a family. It seems to be a pattern in Vermont anyways. The young leave but often come back later when they tire of the fast paced city life or want to raise a family in a nicer environment. The problem is though that's getting a lot harder to do here, fewer and fewer opportunities for income and more and more taxes because of outsiders who moved in and took over.
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Old 08-06-2009, 10:32 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 85,085,792 times
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I have nothing against cities. i'd probaly have a condo in new york city if I was very ;very rich. Those living in a city is like living in a ant pile and your just one the ants.Of course like most the very rich;I;d also have a country place to live in the Hamptons.This has changed in centuries as the rich always have a country estate to live when they are not busy with business.
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Old 08-06-2009, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Bedford County, Va.
261 posts, read 1,166,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
True, but it seems quite a few young people will come back to a more rural place if they decide to raise a family. It seems to be a pattern in Vermont anyways. The young leave but often come back later when they tire of the fast paced city life or want to raise a family in a nicer environment.
I've seen this happen, too -- with my wife. She grew up in a small burg in Virginia, and after college (which was in an even smaller town), all she wanted to do was move to the Virginia Beach area, which has an MSA of nearly 1.7 million people. Seven years after moving to the beach area, with our wedding on the horizon, all she could think was to get back to the rural, mountainous part of the state and get some space and fresher air!

No complaints from me. I was happy to get some breathing room in the country, too.
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Old 08-07-2009, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Middle America
37,131 posts, read 43,045,810 times
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Nothing against cities. I was born and raised in a very rural area, and lived on the outskirts of a tiny community until I was 18, and then I moved to another, equally rural college town until I was 22. Then I moved to the third largest city in the United States. I lived there for a while, and moved back to my hometown area for a number of years. Then I met a guy and moved to be with him. We now live in a midsized city, a metro population of about 2 million (city itself is about 500,000).

I have loved each of my adopted cities, but I'll probably always be most at home in the country; it's where my most formative years were spent. That doesn't mean I dislike city living at all. There are wonderful pros to both urban and rural living, and there are glaring cons to each.

I would probably choose to live rurally/in small towns, overall, but I go where there are jobs of my preference, and it's fine.

I'm the type of person who seeks out the good, wherever my life has taken me. I see no point in squawking about how awful it is to live in _______. Life is what you make it. You decide to hate your life based on where you are. You can decide not to, as well.
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Old 08-10-2009, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Democratic Peoples Republic of Redneckistan
11,102 posts, read 13,352,111 times
Reputation: 3926
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Nothing against cities. I was born and raised in a very rural area, and lived on the outskirts of a tiny community until I was 18, and then I moved to another, equally rural college town until I was 22. Then I moved to the third largest city in the United States. I lived there for a while, and moved back to my hometown area for a number of years. Then I met a guy and moved to be with him. We now live in a midsized city, a metro population of about 2 million (city itself is about 500,000).

I have loved each of my adopted cities, but I'll probably always be most at home in the country; it's where my most formative years were spent. That doesn't mean I dislike city living at all. There are wonderful pros to both urban and rural living, and there are glaring cons to each.

I would probably choose to live rurally/in small towns, overall, but I go where there are jobs of my preference, and it's fine.

I'm the type of person who seeks out the good, wherever my life has taken me. I see no point in squawking about how awful it is to live in _______. Life is what you make it. You decide to hate your life based on where you are. You can decide not to, as well.
GGOD POST and GOOD OUTLOOK
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