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Old 09-13-2009, 09:51 AM
 
4,249 posts, read 8,252,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Ah, you got Frankenchickens, huh? Those are very bizarre birds. If you don't slaughter them they will die of congestive heart failure and they have weird pockets of liquid inside the body cavity when you process them.

When slaughtering a bird, check the end of the breastbone. If it is half cartilage, then you have a fryer. If it is bone all the way out to the tip, then you have a stew or soup bird. After the chicken has been killed and cleaned, put it in chilled salt water at least overnight in the refrigerator before cooking it. For an older bird, use longer slower moist sorts of cooking procedures.

For the absolute best crispy fried chicken, fry it in an inch of pork fat (lard). I'm not sure of the health benefits of that method but the taste is great.

I hang chickens upside down and use a thin knife through the roof of their mouth to pierce their brain. Kills them instantly and then I can slice the veins in the neck so they can bleed out. They still wiggle though. My grannie's neighbor used to just grab them by the head and twirl them twice around til their head came off in his hand. Eewe! Then the body would flop and run about, very messy and left big bruises on the meat. Was an amazing show for the neighbor's visiting grandkids, though.

Beef needs to age about ten days to two weeks before it gets tender and tasty. Pork doesn't need to age as much, just about the same as a chicken.
Frankenchicken, no kidding! I realized I had males and females after some time... That harder one was a rooster.... or whatever close to a rooster they are supposed to be... 'Cause the last one started crowing now (80 days old), and it's one weird mutant coocadoodle.

Thanks about the breastbone tip, will check from now on.

Not sure if I could pull off the through-the-mouth movement... Sounds interesting.

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Old 09-13-2009, 05:25 PM
 
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Those weird birds...those are the Cornish variety right (I am asking as I may be wrong?) I know on another forum I here them chat about Cornish hens all the time.

When we had broilers we used to feed 24/7 and have fresh water 24/7. We also kept the lights on 24/7 because a bird will eat more if it doesn't know that its actually night time and time to sleep. In 7 weeks they would snap the legs off because their bodies were too big for their legs to support, but we grained them up pretty heavy too.
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Old 09-13-2009, 05:33 PM
 
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For beef I like my hang time to be 10 days. 7 days never seemed to be enough, and yet anything over 10 seemed to be a waste of cooler time.

For sheep...I don't know. I slaughtered a lamb last week and had it hang for a day, but I am not sure if that is long enough or not. I have yet to taste the little fella. That had a conversion rate of about half a pound per day.

Sunspirit, you sound like me. I rather enjoy butchering myself, though with this lamb I did not have the time to do it myself.
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:21 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
14,530 posts, read 11,951,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
For beef I like my hang time to be 10 days. 7 days never seemed to be enough, and yet anything over 10 seemed to be a waste of cooler time.

For sheep...I don't know. I slaughtered a lamb last week and had it hang for a day, but I am not sure if that is long enough or not. I have yet to taste the little fella. That had a conversion rate of about half a pound per day.

Sunspirit, you sound like me. I rather enjoy butchering myself, though with this lamb I did not have the time to do it myself.
Most of the sheep guys I know herebouts don't hang lamb at all. The old Basques kill and cook, and I figger these guys know their sheep. I've come up on Basque camps where they were roasting a fresh lamb, right next to a wagon that is home sweet home. They favor a spit over hot coals and a slow rottisiere style cooking, and carve off as it gets done. Kindof an eat as you go thing. Beef we usually hang for ten days in a big walk in, pork gets done quicker, fresh meat is ready in no more than five days kill to freezer, with ham and bacon taking about two weeks, for cure and smoke. Deer and Elk hangs for about 7-10 days. General rule is red meat hangs, white meat not. That is rather oversimplification perhaps, but it's generally accurate. Back to the Basque camp, WOW, these guys can do some cookin' now. LOl, fresh lamb on a spit, beans and hard crust sourdough bread. mmmmmmm. Sometimes simple is better.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:35 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,301 posts, read 12,381,936 times
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Interesting thread ...... thought I'd bump it back up. I wonder if store-bought chicken would benefit from being unwrapped and kept in the fridge for a few days to age it - of course cooking it thoroughly afterward to get rid of the bacteria.
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,543 posts, read 55,461,975 times
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My experience is that most of the store chicken doesn't need it - except sometimes the frozen bags of leg quarters that are about 60 cents per pound. It doesn't hurt them, so I generally do it.
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Old 02-21-2014, 03:16 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
23,486 posts, read 30,095,063 times
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When an animal is killed, the muscles go onto rigor mortis. With chickens, they should be chilled quickly after butchering and then rested until the rigor passes.

24 hours in the fridge should do the job.

You don't "age" chickens, but you do need to wait for rigor to pass before cooking them. If the legs and wings move easily, the chicken is ready.

Rigor will pass in the freezer, but very slowly. You can freeze after butchering, but it will be longer than 24 hours before the birds are ready to eat.
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Old 02-10-2016, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Alaska
417 posts, read 235,146 times
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NEVER hang chickens. I wouldon't recommend butchering them early in the morning, put them in large tubs full of ice and let them chill till after lunch them wrap them. Never let them get warm.
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Old 02-10-2016, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
2,555 posts, read 3,252,771 times
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I always raised rabbits....they are way easier to pluck.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 02-10-2016, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,200 posts, read 17,047,480 times
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Call me a pervert, but when I saw the thread title I thought the OP was asking about the average penis size of a rooster.
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