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Old 08-23-2009, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,957,890 times
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I never really thought about it, but I must have had a thing with trains, because looking back in life at most of the places I lived, I was never far from one. Let me start from the begining......
I'm always saying that I was born and raised on a Dairy farm, but that's not actually how it was.
I was born in a house in a small town in NW Michigan. Next to the house was a park with an old steam engine on display. Across the street was a brick train station,next to that was a small Kraft milk processing building and next to that was a keiser steel plant.(at the age of 4 we moved to the farm).
(gap) At 16 I was on my own, I always wanted to see California. Later I was hitch hicking through St Luis, Mo., and spotted a hugh train yard. I started gettin' ideas. I went in the yard and ask a worker in the yard if any of those trains lined up were going to Ca. He said, you see that one over there moving real slow? it's headed for San Diego.So I jumped onto an empty box car.
Now, this guy never told me that there would be close to 50 stops in between, in places like, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Minnisota, Montana, Colorado, and more. It zig zagged through the country and it took over a week to get there. The only problem with that is it was the middle of winter and I lost my jacket somewhere along the line, one door was jammed open and it really got cold at night. During the day I would ride with my legs hanging over the side and explore the country(beautiful),,at night I slept under a pile of staw and fell asleep by the rythem of the wheels.
I remember seeing 3-4 pigs on the tracks, they were cut clean in half.

Late one night I woke up and noticed the train had stopped. I didn't know where we were but I was freezing my ****'s off. I looked out the door and seen some men with flash lights walking alongside the train checking cars. They found me and before they could say anything I ask where we were, he said "the Colorado Mountains". I told him where I was going and where I was coming from. I thought I'd be thrown off but I got to ride in the warm caboose the rest of the way. I got off in Escondido, Ca.
Talking about "life time adventures"!.......

In 1981 I moved into a house in San Bernardino,Ca. It was about 3 blocks from some train tracks that went up through "cajon Pass" in the San Bernardino Mountains.
In 1989 there was a train wreck right behind my place. The train was overloaded and lost it's breaks coming down Cajon Pass. 2 weeks later there was a gas pipe explosion cause by heavy equipment cleaning up the wreck..
If you lived in SoCal you may have heard about it. It's on the internet. On some sites like "The crash files" it's titled "Disaster on Duffy Street".San Bernardino train disaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In 2007 I moved to a small town in SW Oklahoma and I live "approx,"100ft, from a train track...

Last edited by mkfarnam; 08-23-2009 at 11:53 AM..
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,433 posts, read 10,042,174 times
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Couldn't resist, here's the You Tube video of the O'Jays singing "Love Train."


YouTube - Love Train - The O' Jays
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Old 08-23-2009, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,131 posts, read 43,045,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
I love riding trains. I lived next to tracks and freight trains literally every hour too long to want to live right next to them. But go to the amtrak site and check the route of the Southwest Chief. It goes across the midsection of the country, through northern Arizona, New Mexico (stops at Ratan, which at least looks like an awesome place, the southern corner of Colorado and into Kansas and reaches Chicago. I WISH I could get to it from here where I live since I don't much like the southern route they use.

But it goes through a lot of small towns and runs daily. You could even hop on board and take trips. If you hunt around a bit you can get the full schedule on the site.
I grew up in an Amtrak community served by the Southwest Chief. As a young adult, I had an apartment that was in a historic building right along the train track.
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Old 08-24-2009, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,901,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I grew up in an Amtrak community served by the Southwest Chief. As a young adult, I had an apartment that was in a historic building right along the train track.
Wow, thats cool. The freight traffic wasn't as bad until gas prices went up and they started running longer and more frequent trains. Living near the main freight depot in the region didn't help either. One person didn't belive me we had three or four trains an hour until they visited. They had both train horns and track horns which were VERY loud and went off before the train was near. Stuff slid off shelves from the vibration. The tracks were in a sort of canyon and when the train would sound kinda funky I'd just hope it made it somewhere else.

I went halfway across the country and back on amtrak in a bit over a year so I guess you could say I like trains. One trip, there were a couple of men who had retired or were on the verge taking the train all the way to chicago. They got off for the night once in a while and were looking at towns and areas and prices of housing. I love where I live but it would be cool to have an amtrak stop in town. Sure would make it easier to get places.

The southern route literally spends OVER a day slowly trudging through the less than pristine tracks in Texas. No offence to Texas but I didn't see anyone there who was house hunting. If only there was a way to get from here to Kansas conviently and I'd taking the Southwest Chief, hands down.
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Old 09-05-2009, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Southern Willamette Valley, Oregon
7,029 posts, read 8,046,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calicocutie View Post
Bydand, We're looking for a train that runs through it. I also should have stated that we like mountains, cold weather, and snow. I suppose that really narrows areas down quite a bit, doesn't it? Thanks for your replies so far.

Why not Truckee, California. You have all three of those things there. Just west of there the ML drops into the largest classification yard west of Omaha. Not to mention also that Sacramento has the biggest and baddest railroad museum in the U.S.! Truckee is a quaint little town and LOTS of snow.
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Old 09-08-2009, 12:25 PM
 
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Default Towns with trains

Quote:
Originally Posted by calicocutie View Post
My husband and I love trains. Can anyone tell me about small, quaint towns that have trains? When we retire in a few years that is one of our top priorities--find a small town with trains. Thanks in advance for your input.

LaGrange, Kentucky has trains that run through center of town, the town is very nice and an awesome place to visit
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Old 09-08-2009, 04:12 PM
 
Location: un peu près de Chicago
773 posts, read 2,159,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calicocutie View Post
My husband and I love trains. Can anyone tell me about small, quaint towns that have trains? When we retire in a few years that is one of our top priorities--find a small town with trains.
ROCHELLE, ILLINOIS


YouTube - Sunrise/Sunset - A Day at Rochelle, Illinois DVD

But if you are from New England, I'd think twice about moving to Illinois. Unless you like to watch corn grow or paint dry on the side of a barn, the American midwest can be a rather dull place. Trust me,
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Old 09-08-2009, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Vermont, grew up in Colorado and California
5,296 posts, read 6,269,479 times
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Hillrose Colorado has a nearby track, I always ran out to wave to the trains and watch them.
It is a rather dull town as well just to warn you.

These days I have my Lionel.


Last edited by Summerz; 09-08-2009 at 07:39 PM..
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Old 09-09-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,098,557 times
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I lived in Merrow, CT while we were in college. Our trailer was 75 ft from the track. When the trains, not too many, went by all conversation stopped. The empty rock cars sounded like the end of the world (with a grade crossing whistle).

I would not mind living within the sound of a train once in a while. I doubt if I would like to hear mile long Transcon freights pounding past at 80 mph every 15 minutes though.
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Old 09-10-2009, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
4,120 posts, read 5,435,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
No mountains in Minnesota, but the rail line from ND border to Becker Minnesota is very busy ( many long coal trains along with normal freight trains and Amtrak )

Since the rail tracks roughly follow HWY 10, nearly every town between Becker and ND would be on it.

Becker is where the big coal fired electric plant is located.
I was going to mention the BNSF line there along Hwy 10. The Empire Builder is the Amtrak train that runs daily. All sorts of Freight traffic is always moving. It isn't all Flat Land either but Mountains its not. We do have the cold and snow upon request. The Great Northern Railway was a huge piece of history, there's plenty of small towns all along the original Main Line.
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