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Old 09-21-2009, 11:39 PM
 
Location: IN
21,104 posts, read 36,596,839 times
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We have new issues with urbanites moving into rural areas near where I live and then clearing large tracks of land for horse farms. This would not be as big of an issue if they did not build these enormous outdoor tracks and barns. The zoning is rural/residential so it is unclear as to whether these large farms are compatible with higher density residential housing nearby.
You would think that many of them would move to KY where land prices are much cheaper as well as energy costs.
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Old 09-22-2009, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 32,189,619 times
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Here in Ocala, we have the opposite problem......unchecked, growth at any cost has eaten up some of the most beautiful and historic horse farms.
The latest horror is the building of a new outdoor mall on the site of one of the most beautiful farms..........kicker is, 2 years later, the mall is over 80% empty, what a shame!
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Old 09-23-2009, 04:39 PM
 
Location: IN
21,104 posts, read 36,596,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
Here in Ocala, we have the opposite problem......unchecked, growth at any cost has eaten up some of the most beautiful and historic horse farms.
The latest horror is the building of a new outdoor mall on the site of one of the most beautiful farms..........kicker is, 2 years later, the mall is over 80% empty, what a shame!
Here in NH, people are chopping up large tracts of forests for horse farms. It is quite ridiculous. However, at least we have large amounts of conservation land with public access, unlike other parts of the country.
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Old 09-23-2009, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 32,189,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Here in NH, people are chopping up large tracts of forests for horse farms. It is quite ridiculous. However, at least we have large amounts of conservation land with public access, unlike other parts of the country.
How awful! Dont they have any restrictions on land use there?
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Old 09-23-2009, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 10,346,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
We have new issues with urbanites moving into rural areas near where I live and then clearing large tracks of land for horse farms. This would not be as big of an issue if they did not build these enormous outdoor tracks and barns. The zoning is rural/residential so it is unclear as to whether these large farms are compatible with higher density residential housing nearby.
You would think that many of them would move to KY where land prices are much cheaper as well as energy costs.

Are you kidding me You are complaining about a horse farm? Why don't you move to Boston where the zoning is different and you don't have to worry about such a thing as a HORSE FARM being near you! The horror of it all.
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Old 09-23-2009, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,121 posts, read 27,057,938 times
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Where my parents live, we have 'urbanites' trying to live the country lifestyle, but with all that the city has to offer. It's irritating when you've lived somewhere for 15+ years, but all of a sudden a bunch of a-holes move across the street, build a GIANT house and then complain that our dairy goats make too much noise in the morning, and that our horses smell like....horses.
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Old 09-24-2009, 11:44 AM
 
19,843 posts, read 17,926,126 times
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We're in a similar situation. We're kind of a mini Kentucky in that we have very limestone rich soil and that makes horses that eat grass on it have strong bones( limestone is high in calcium). Its also great for growing crops. So some corporations have bought some farms and taken to raising horses on them as opposed to growing other crops.
It beats having housing developments but they're largely prevented from being built anyway due to zoning. And horses don't bring as much money into the area as raising cows or steers or crops would. Luckily farming is still very profitable and that has kept developers from making too much of a negative impact.
The big pork producing farms are what you want to keep out of your area at all costs, also the big poultry farms. They wreck the local groundwater and bring in swarms of flies and the smell is terrible.
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Old 09-24-2009, 12:34 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,682,398 times
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----" Luckily farming is still very profitable "

VERY profitable ?
I doubt that.

Land prices have either leveled off or dropped and farm magazines say farmers can not continue paying the high rents they were paying and make a go of it.
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Old 09-24-2009, 02:52 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,784 posts, read 7,041,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icy Tea View Post
The big pork producing farms are what you want to keep out of your area at all costs, also the big poultry farms. They wreck the local groundwater and bring in swarms of flies and the smell is terrible.
So much for bacon and eggs for breakfast.
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Old 09-24-2009, 03:34 PM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,882,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icy Tea View Post
We're in a similar situation. We're kind of a mini Kentucky in that we have very limestone rich soil and that makes horses that eat grass on it have strong bones( limestone is high in calcium). Its also great for growing crops. So some corporations have bought some farms and taken to raising horses on them as opposed to growing other crops.
It beats having housing developments but they're largely prevented from being built anyway due to zoning. And horses don't bring as much money into the area as raising cows or steers or crops would. Luckily farming is still very profitable and that has kept developers from making too much of a negative impact.
The big pork producing farms are what you want to keep out of your area at all costs, also the big poultry farms. They wreck the local groundwater and bring in swarms of flies and the smell is terrible.
They can't wreck groundwater. The earth is the perfect filter. By the time rain goes thought layers of sand and gravel, it is clean. I promise.
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