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Old 12-15-2016, 07:09 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,203,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
What if the guy is disabled and home 24/7?
Then I guess I'd stop popping firecrackers altogether, at least in close proximity. At my current place, there's plenty of space where I can track "into the deep" and be a much longer distance away, any popping I'd do would now be in that area vs in the areas close to the house plots.

It's funny how people seem to almost go out of their way to be right next to someone's house doing such things when it doesn't have to be that way. About 3-4 years ago someone was riding their 4-wheelers on the path right in front of my house. I don't care for the noise, and I didn't care for them zooming back & forth that way in area where my kids play on their Big Wheels. That was silly in that we have TONS of paths where one can ride and not be anywhere near anybody's house at all, why would he choose to ride right in front of my house? We rent (the 4-wheeler was a resident too), and the landlord isn't big on 4-wheelers at all to start with (they like me appreciate peace and quiet) so I was able to shoo him away.

People can be bad about doing that sort of thing and it makes no sense at all when it's so easy to come up with a compromise. Sometimes I think it's malicious in nature, I think sometimes people derive a certain amount of FUN in annoying other people that way.
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Old 12-16-2016, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Sector 001
7,294 posts, read 6,676,262 times
Reputation: 8407
moo.

moooooooooooooo.
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Old 12-21-2016, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Northern California
269 posts, read 162,416 times
Reputation: 548
Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
cows are free to roam anyplace they want in Northern California?


even on the edges of towns ?
Some places, yes!

We had two pitt bulls from down the street come to our house and kill our free ranging chickens. Legally we could have shot the dogs while they were killing our chickens (we didn't). It was our responsibility to fence the wandering dogs out of our yard.

My neighbors had a bunch of goats (the goats all died in the 2015 Valley Fire) and it was my responsibility to fence the goats out. Obviously, good goat owners do not want their goats wandering around in the road.
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Old 12-21-2016, 10:25 PM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,668,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaisyMaeB View Post
Some places, yes!

We had two pitt bulls from down the street come to our house and kill our free ranging chickens. Legally we could have shot the dogs while they were killing our chickens (we didn't). It was our responsibility to fence the wandering dogs out of our yard.

My neighbors had a bunch of goats (the goats all died in the 2015 Valley Fire) and it was my responsibility to fence the goats out. Obviously, good goat owners do not want their goats wandering around in the road.
Do city parks have to be completely fenced in order to keep cattle off the grass?


Do golf courses have to be completely fenced to keep cattle off ?
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Old 12-22-2016, 06:08 AM
 
2,569 posts, read 2,609,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
Do city parks have to be completely fenced in order to keep cattle off the grass?


Do golf courses have to be completely fenced to keep cattle off ?
Cattle usually prefer to be away from people so don't often go into town far enough to get to parks.

Golf courses on the edges of town are usually fenced.

I live in a state with "fence out" laws and support those laws. I do not own cattle, sheep, or goats, but take care of my property.
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Old 12-22-2016, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,200 posts, read 17,049,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
Do city parks have to be completely fenced in order to keep cattle off the grass?
Most of the time this is a non-issue as cattle aren't going to wander through town to hang out at he city park. In situations where the park is at the edge of town, assuming it's an open range state, then yes.

In my state the fence would be co-owned by the city and the adjacent property owner.


Quote:
Do golf courses have to be completely fenced to keep cattle off ?
Cattle aren't the only animals that might end up on the golf course.

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Old 01-05-2017, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,924 posts, read 12,992,738 times
Reputation: 20787
Check the laws in your state. In my state, they are your cows until he pays to get them back. Build a corral, herd them in, and feed and water them at $50 a day until he ponies up. That fence will get fixed real fast.
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Old 01-05-2017, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,200 posts, read 17,049,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
Check the laws in your state. In my state, they are your cows until he pays to get them back. Build a corral, herd them in, and feed and water them at $50 a day until he ponies up. That fence will get fixed real fast.
Not really. Oregon is broken up into livestock districts (fence in) and open range areas (fence out).

If cattle stray onto your property in a livestock district you can be compensated for the cost of care and any damage they cause, plus any costs associated with giving notice that you have the cattle. You have to give notice to the owner that you have the livestock within five days, and if not recovered by the owner they will be turned over to the DOA to be sold between 30 and 45 days from the date the animals were caught.

And you don't necessarily get to charge whatever you want to take care of the livestock. If the owner doesn't agree with what you want to charge he can apply to the DOA to arbitrate the case. If you try to charge $50 a day they're going to knock it down to whatever the prevailing rate for boarding cattle and will probably be more critical of whatever other costs you submit. Better to just ask for what it actually costs.

Swine have to be fenced in in both livestock districts and open range areas.
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Old 01-06-2017, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,924 posts, read 12,992,738 times
Reputation: 20787
Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Not really. Oregon is broken up into livestock districts (fence in) and open range areas (fence out).

If cattle stray onto your property in a livestock district you can be compensated for the cost of care and any damage they cause, plus any costs associated with giving notice that you have the cattle. You have to give notice to the owner that you have the livestock within five days, and if not recovered by the owner they will be turned over to the DOA to be sold between 30 and 45 days from the date the animals were caught.

And you don't necessarily get to charge whatever you want to take care of the livestock. If the owner doesn't agree with what you want to charge he can apply to the DOA to arbitrate the case. If you try to charge $50 a day they're going to knock it down to whatever the prevailing rate for boarding cattle and will probably be more critical of whatever other costs you submit. Better to just ask for what it actually costs.

Swine have to be fenced in in both livestock districts and open range areas.
There is no privately owned open range in Oregon. The BLM and USFS manage almost a million square miles of federal lands that are "open range," but if you try to put your cattle there without a contract you will end up paying grazing fees and probably fines. I had a neighbor who thought he could run his cows on my place. I complained for six months with no action. Finally he tried to pull the "open range" BS. I said fine, if you want open range I'll give you open range, and took down my fences along the highway.

Rates are probably variable, but an hour of labor a day at $25 is not unreasonable, plus the cost of hay, grain, water and facilities. Damages would be limited to the bill from the landscape contractor, and probably wouldn't be over $2500, regardless of the number of cows.
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Old 01-06-2017, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,200 posts, read 17,049,712 times
Reputation: 12393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
There is no privately owned open range in Oregon. The BLM and USFS manage almost a million square miles of federal lands that are "open range," but if you try to put your cattle there without a contract you will end up paying grazing fees and probably fines. I had a neighbor who thought he could run his cows on my place. I complained for six months with no action. Finally he tried to pull the "open range" BS. I said fine, if you want open range I'll give you open range, and took down my fences along the highway.
https://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/...ges/Range.aspx

Quote:
Rates are probably variable, but an hour of labor a day at $25 is not unreasonable, plus the cost of hay, grain, water and facilities. Damages would be limited to the bill from the landscape contractor, and probably wouldn't be over $2500, regardless of the number of cows.
If the state arbitrates a case they are going to look at prevailing charges in the area for boarding livestock. Your estimate may be accurate, it may not. Regardless, it would be smarter to call the local USDA office to find out what people are paying for pasture board in the area than to make up some number and waste time fighting about it.

And damages would be way more than that if the cattle got into a standing corn or alfalfa field, or an area where hay bales were stored. They can be hard on equipment, too. And goats are hard on everything.
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