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Old 09-27-2009, 08:02 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,686,634 times
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There still is a fair amount of pasture rental going on near me.

( mostly dairy heifers and dry cows)

A good pasture with a good fence gets rented.
A good pasture with a poor fence does not and is left to grow wild.

The main reason you see former pastures where the brush has taken hold and the grass is tall every fall is it has a poor fence.

No renter wants it.
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Old 09-27-2009, 08:02 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,592,208 times
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I still say it sounds like the OP is an ass. In the first post it sounds like the owner of the cattle took care of the fence break between the properties, then the second time mentioned how it is a shared fence. He could have brought that up the first time, but didn't. Then to draw an analogy between dogs getting loose and cows getting loose, as well as out of control teenagers on a vandalism spree and damage done by some cows is just utterly ridiculous. If you had 5 teenagers that vandalized your neighbors property it isn't your responsibility to take care if it, it is the brats responsibility to take care of what they did. As teens they would work off the cost of damage. 20 loose dogs would depend, if you made no effort to constrain them and just let them run wild, I'd have some target practice. If you DID try to keep them confined to your property and they got loose, yes I would clean up the mess they left and call it good.

To toss out how it is a "very nice neighborhood, not some shack on a field of corn" just shows their own perception on what is the norm for living in the country. Typical. Move out to the country and think the cost of a house or the condition of their landscaping makes a good neighbor.

Side with the cattle owner, damn right I did, and still am. Faux farmer here? Nope, lived in the sticks most of my life, handled plenty of cattle, horses, pigs, chickens, goats, ducks, geese (hate ducks and Geese, but that is another rant ), and even some sheep. Had to deal with idiots who move out to the country and put up some McMansion, then complain about the smell, or some other minor inconvenience that can and does happen once in a while. Never once have I lived in a shack in a cornfield (or any place else for that matter).
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Old 09-27-2009, 08:07 PM
 
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comparing ag smells with an animal physically coming on your property is comparing apples to oranges
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Old 09-27-2009, 08:13 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,592,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
comparing ag smells with an animal physically coming on your property is comparing apples to oranges
Yes it is, I have dealt with both issues. Mostly with very positive outcomes, once they see you really ARE trying to contain your animals. Yes to keep the peace, but also because they are a big investment. Some though, just never understand that it isn't the city anymore.
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Old 09-27-2009, 09:10 PM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Yes it is, I have dealt with both issues. Mostly with very positive outcomes, once they see you really ARE trying to contain your animals. Yes to keep the peace, but also because they are a big investment. Some though, just never understand that it isn't the city anymore.
I have never lived in a 'city' in my life. I was raised in a farm . I feel that most of the ones trashing the OP are extremely inconsiderate of the rights of other property owners, regardless of how small their property is. Yes cattle are a "big investment" but so is the time, money, and energy put into maintaining your own piece of land in the way you want it. A big rancher has no more right to look down on the small property owner, and infringe on it, any more that he has the right to enter the person's home and damage it's contents !

Unless the cattle owner in the OP's post offered to compensate the OP for the damage done to his place, he was a jerk! And all who are dissing the small property owner are jerks!
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Old 09-27-2009, 09:22 PM
 
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Where i live the sheriiff will come out and pickup the cattle; they have a special unit. They will then fine the owner for cost. It seems to have made the cattlemen more responsible since they started this. It bascailly happened after several bad accidents. If they are not branded they do not get them back which use to be common so as to avoid liabilty for accidents.
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Old 09-29-2009, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,118,411 times
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It seems to me that the OP should learn the unwritten "rules" for living where he does.

You should see the fences around the pastures used by a bison herd. They would nearly stop a tank. Apparently bison always think the grass is greener on the other side and with their fur to insulate them from an electric fence and their incredible strength keeping them on their side is a major operation.

PS: the meat is expensive but very tasty.
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Old 09-29-2009, 08:19 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,686,634 times
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The unwritten rule where I live is---------keep your cattle on your own property

That is the rule that farmers expect other farmers to follow .
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Old 09-29-2009, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,490 posts, read 38,410,774 times
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I think what most people are saying here is that when you move to Rome, you need to learn the Roman way. (Very old rule, such an old rule that it's become a cliche.) Why? Because the OP will be much happier if they manage to do that, to learn how things work where they live, to not get all upset when the things that happen in the country (cows getting out no matter how well they're fenced, and they will, as an example) happen, and work WITH their neighbors rather than against them.

Trust me, there is something that the OP does that they have no idea is just as annoying to their neighbors as the cows are to them. Maybe they're afraid of the dark and have really bright lights that shine all night, destroying the view of the stars and the country peace and quiet for their neighbors. Maybe they have a dog or two (not 20) that they let run loose because, after all, that's one reason they moved to the country, and said dogs wouldn't harm a fly, they're SWEETdogs that just happen to chase livestock when their owners aren't around. Maybe they push for changes such as sidewalks or rules against livestock or any number of other "citified" ways of doing things. Maybe they don't wave when passing an oncoming vehicle and thus are considered "stuck up" and "snobbish". Maybe they think their neighbors should mow their "lawn" (read: front hay pasture) more often. Could be any number of things that are "the way it's done" where they come from that don't fit in their new environment.

So, for peace and tranquility and happiness for both the OP and their neighbors, they need to make an effort to fit in, to learn the ways of their new environment, to work WITH them instead of against them. It's been my experience that when someone does that, they're actually more likely to have the neighbor with the offending cows volunteer to help (note: "help") clean up the problem than they are when they come in with demands for changes like an out of control bull.
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Old 09-29-2009, 10:07 AM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,330,395 times
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"estray" cattle are treated differently in many states, according to local laws and customs.

Here in Wyoming, the fence between two properties is always the shared responsibility between the property owners. If cattle get through the fence, breaking it down, then it's generally accepted that the primary responsibility to fix the fence is the cattle owner's ... but the adjacent property owner also benefits from the fence because Wyoming is a "fence out" state. That means if you don't want the cattle on your rural property, you must fence the cattle out of your place.

So, if you don't want the cattle on your land, the primary responsibility to keep them off your land is your responsibility. Fix the fence. If you want to be able to go after the cattle owner for damages, then you must first build and maintain a "legal" livestock fence. The state statutes describe what constitutes a "legal" fence, which is typically a 5 barbed wire fence with appropriate corner posts, posts, reinforcing, and structure every so many yards to keep it stable. The statute describes a pretty stout fence, but it is only the minimum, and circumstances of terrain may dictate that a compliant fence will actually require even more fence materials. A "hot wire" is not part of the "legal" fence, but it can certainly help if the cattle are trained to respect the hot wire; some do, some don't. And I've seen a number of unruly steers that will crash any fence, or jump over them ... and train the rest of the herd to do the same if left with them for any amount of time.

We have seen problems in our area when city folk move in on a 40 acre parcel and think that everything that may happen to their property is everybody else's fault. Sorry, but when the cattle get out ... and they will, sooner or later ... and graze through your landscaping and garden, it's not the fault of the cattle owner. It's the 40 acre parcel owner's responsibility to fence out the cattle, or horses, or goats, or sheep, or other livestock that may be in the area and get loose. You can call the livestock board and they'll send out a brand inspector who will do everything he can to identify the owner of the livestock and notify them to come get them, if they aren't already looking for the strays. But you have no right to claim the animals, or seek damages ... unless you corral, feed & water them for an extended period of time and can establish a "feeder's lien" on the livestock because the owner never came to get them. Even then, if the livestock suffers any damage while in your care, you are the one liable for damages.

The best thing you can do if livestock strays onto your property in Wyoming is to corral them in a safe place with water available and call the neighbor who owns them or the livestock authorities. Especially true when we sometimes see a horse get loose; best to just safely corral or pasture it and locate the owner to retrieve it. I've even had times where I've found a couple of stray horses on the road and rounded them up and herded them into a neighbor's pasture ... not the horse owner's pasture, but another neighbor's place, where the horses could be safe until the owner was notified that their horses got out. Everybody was happy with this resolution, and the owner was grateful that the horses were removed from danger on the road.

Whether or not these laws and concepts apply to your local situation is an entirely different matter. Which is why it's important to learn the local/state laws where you've moved to. You may not agree with the laws, so it's good to consider them before you move into an area where you may have to be burdened with these issues of helping out with livestock that you don't own and/or having damages due to them.
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