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Old 10-25-2009, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,687,318 times
Reputation: 8303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeman View Post
OP here (A.K.A "ass" to some of you). Nope, not from the City. Nope, where I live is NOT open range, therefore the law is on my side. I do happen to have my property completely fenced...just not the driveway, and that's how they got in the second time. Right up the driveway.

Nope, did not "behave like a bull and demand changes" (where do you get this??) I accepted it gracefully the first time it happened, then asked the neighbor to please keep his animals on his own property the second time it happended in a week. (and have since found out this cattle farmer is not liked by the neighbors because he never feeds the cows and they regularly break out of his acreage to find grass elsewhere)

And to TexasHorseLady (who I am very glad I do not live near by)-

-I have no dogs
-I do not turn on ANY lights outside my home...guess what? I like the stars too!
-I wave to my neighbors
-I don't push to 'change' anything

All I want was to live on my little space of this Earth (that I worked damn hard for) in peace and quiet, doing my own thing and bothering no-one. And all I asked in return is if my personal property was damaged, that the person responsible would make sure it was unlikely to happen again, and offer to take care of the damage. Didn't think that was so much to ask for.
It's not too much to ask. A farmer who doesn't maintain his fences where I live, is considered a poor and inconsiderate farmer. The farmers where I live take every bit as much pride in their yards as you do in yours.

And the farmer responsible should offer to pay for the damages. It does happen, and can happen to the best of farmers that the occasional livestock gets out. The farmer should be fixing his fence immediately, should offer to pay, or clean up the mess left on your yard. The non-farmer should be understanding for the very occasional trespassing of livestock, and not make a big deal out of it but this has happened to you twice, and there's no g-dam way you should pay for any part of his fence.

Open range, different story. You don't sound like an unreasonable man at all.
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Old 10-25-2009, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,687,318 times
Reputation: 8303
I couldn't find an edit button to add something to my post, but I'd like to add what my father did with a neighbouring farmer whose cattle were always getting out and into ours.

After years of calling and said neighbour coming down when he apparently felt like it, a day or two - or three or even four later, my dad stopped calling, and chained the stock in our barn. He wouldn't speak to the neighbour on the phone - the neighbour had to come to him, sheepishly - humbly even, if he wanted his stock back. Mind you, I think my father would have given it back anyway, but the neighbour looking at my dad's steely blue eyes at that point, probably wasn't too sure of that.

What was worth more to him - the cattle or having the fence fixed?

Then, at my father's convenience, after a day, or two - or three or four - he would allow the neighbour to pick up his livestock. After three or four times of that happening, we suddenly no longer had loose livestock running around from that neighbour - and that is the only neighbour in a region full of farmers who ever had such poor fences that his cows got out on a regular basis.

Farmers who have a history of poor fences are usually well-known as poor farmers by other farmers.

You may not have the the place to chain or pen up the farmer's wandering livestock should they do it again, but if you do, there's one suggestion.

And for those who think nothing of wandering livestock, I would like to point out that loose livestock is dangerous to everyone. Not long ago in a neighbouring town two girls were killed when their vehicle ran into several horses late at night. The horses mortally wounded, and the owners had a history of poor fencing.

Loose livestock is as much a danger as those dogs people complain about. It is only through luck that I avoided what looked like a fairly large herd of cows one night driving home. I was not speeding but they were completely invisible in the night coming across a two-lane highway.

Laws may vary across state and country, but common sense and common courtesy, concern for your neighbour's property as well as your own, should be in the mind of every self-respecting farmer. That goes back as far as Biblical law as Exodus 22: 5 states:

Whenever someone lets his livestock graze in a field or a vineyard, and they stray and graze in another person's field, he must make up for what the damaged field was expected to produce. But if he lets them ruin the whole field with their grazing, he must make up from his own field for the loss with the best from his field and vineyard.

Farmers are also obligated to be 'a good neighbour.' It isn't just up to the guy whose had his lawn trampled to death to offer to fix a fence that is not his, for cattle that are not his, for something he had nothing monetary to gain from.
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Old 10-29-2009, 11:10 AM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
3,978 posts, read 7,698,665 times
Reputation: 3766
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeman View Post
OP here (A.K.A "ass" to some of you). Nope, not from the City. Nope, where I live is NOT open range, therefore the law is on my side. I do happen to have my property completely fenced...just not the driveway, and that's how they got in the second time. Right up the driveway.

Nope, did not "behave like a bull and demand changes" (where do you get this??) I accepted it gracefully the first time it happened, then asked the neighbor to please keep his animals on his own property the second time it happended in a week. (and have since found out this cattle farmer is not liked by the neighbors because he never feeds the cows and they regularly break out of his acreage to find grass elsewhere)

And to TexasHorseLady (who I am very glad I do not live near by)-

-I have no dogs
-I do not turn on ANY lights outside my home...guess what? I like the stars too!
-I wave to my neighbors
-I don't push to 'change' anything

All I want was to live on my little space of this Earth (that I worked damn hard for) in peace and quiet, doing my own thing and bothering no-one. And all I asked in return is if my personal property was damaged, that the person responsible would make sure it was unlikely to happen again, and offer to take care of the damage. Didn't think that was so much to ask for.

YES! I do so agree with you. One of the biggest problems is the lack of respect that people have towards others and their property.

Netwit, I certainly agree with you also. Great posts.
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:20 PM
 
3 posts, read 7,152 times
Reputation: 15
You only have two choices. Work with you neighbor or move back to the city. No matter how tedious it seems, working with your neighbor is the best answer. You'll make a friend and at the same time will learn a thing or two. Getting controversial or contrarian will not get you anywhere. It will only make you the pariah of the neighborhood and when you need help (trust me you will) nobody will try to give you a hand.
Living in the country is a state of mind and a different lifestyle. City rules and restrictions don't apply. At the same time peace of mind, liberty (for all), and lack of confinement (even for animals) makes it pay off. You will not have to worry about anyone breaking into your property, your well armed neighbor will keep an eye out for you (you better get a gun too), you will not have to worry about any shenanigan from any of your neighbors (everybody is pleasant and too busy).
There are you choices. Stop being the city spoiled brat and start getting with the program, it will pay off.
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Old 07-02-2011, 05:25 PM
 
3 posts, read 7,152 times
Reputation: 15
You only have two choices. Work with you neighbor or move back to the city. No matter how tedious it seems, working with your neighbor is the best answer. You'll make a friend and at the same time will learn a thing or two. Getting controversial or contrarian will not get you anywhere. It will only make you the pariah of the neighborhood and when you need help (trust me you will) nobody will try to give you a hand.
Living in the country is a state of mind and a different lifestyle. City rules and restrictions don't apply. At the same time peace of mind, liberty (for all), and lack of confinement (even for animals) makes it pay off. You will not have to worry about anyone breaking into your property, your well armed neighbor will keep an eye out for you (you better get a gun too), you will not have to worry about any shenanigan from any of your neighbors (everybody is pleasant and too busy).
There are you choices. Stop being the city spoiled brat and start getting with the program, it will pay off.
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Old 07-22-2015, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee, rural area
3 posts, read 4,809 times
Reputation: 10
I got to this site because I wondered how to keep the neighbor's cows, dogs and goats out of my yard and off my porch. Sounds like, being a renter, I don't have any right to expect the rural goat/cow breeder who is my landlord to do much to ensure his animals keep off my portion of rented property. We've lived here for almost 20 years and the rancher's mother used to be in charge. After she died several years ago, they started raising boer goats to show (there are now in excess of 50 of them). They always had "beefalo" and they were never a problem until the goats showed up. I think part of the problem of the marauding animals is too large a herd for the amount of grazing land (anyone know how many head per acre is recommended?). Most of the close to 80 acre "ranch" is hilly, wooded and rocky with very little actual grassland (maybe 5 acres total) and there are probably 30 to 40 head of cattle right now, including calves. They used to have electric fencing but began turning it off and now they don't even bother pretending to have it. I also check several times during the day for "visitors" entering the area and still, just this afternoon, there were 5 cows and 4 goats in my yard, walking all over my garden and eating everything, even though the lawn had just been mowed and weed-eated yesterday. Are they just hungry or what?? It's so frustrating.
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Old 07-22-2015, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee, rural area
3 posts, read 4,809 times
Reputation: 10
Question Cows, goats and goat-dogs, oh my!

I think one of the things that annoys me so much about our current situation is that when we first moved here we had a dog because we were now living in the country. In a short time, we were told we had to keep her chained up because "she scared the cows" (we are renters and the neighbors/landowners/landlords had cattle) when she would bark at them and would try herding them a little when they got close to the yard. But she got off her chain several times and so our son, who lived in a nearby city, took her to his fenced-in yard. She promptly jumped the chain link fence and got hit by a car and killed. So much for having a dog out in the country.
Now, the landlords have several Great pyrenees dogs for their goat herd which they started about 4 years ago. The dogs seem to think they are welcome on our porch to take cushions, clothing off the line, and they love to do their business on our lawn, too. The first year, the goats were few and stayed put. Then they multiplied and grew out of their small "pen" to eat everything on my porch and yard. Once, the family replaced a hibiscus the goats ate and they promptly ate the replacement plant as well. I have figured out how to block their access to my porch but the yard is another matter. I have reinforced the old wire fencing with scrap tin sheets and ran a strand of my own barbed wire across part of the front yard, but haven't got a gate yet. Still, it limits their access to the yard and I can keep watch out my front door for the sneaky SOBs.
If I had a dog, I wouldn't have to worry about the goats and cows most likely. Maybe I should just get another dog? I don't know.
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Old 07-22-2015, 11:31 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 85,092,512 times
Reputation: 18083
Here once they get out we have sheriff officers who come out and take care of it and charge the owner. Now that only happens with repeats here but people are not reluctant to call on repeat offenders.Most here do not just let their fencing go therefore.No goats but I know some who have them and they shoot on site on their land.
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Old 07-23-2015, 06:09 AM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,311,975 times
Reputation: 15082
Depends upon your state livestock laws and the terms of your leasehold.

You may find that you need to "fence out" the land you wish to protect from cows.

I've never heard of it being legal or acceptable to shoot livestock.

Your dog may have been "running" the livestock, which is not acceptable. In my state, if you catch a dog doing so with your livestock, it's legal to shoot it and most livestock operations won't hesitate to do so. Allowing your dog to run at large in a livestock area isn't a good idea if it "plays" with the livestock. Getting another dog may be problematic for you; if it injures, kills, or "runs" livestock, you will be liable for the livestock loss if it's allowed to run free.

Boers can be difficult to fence in. But the owners are responsible for doing so and any damage they cause to other's property. The LGD's should be staying with the livestock and not causing you problems. Great Pyr's can be good LGD's and stay with their charges, but I've also seen a lot of untrained Great Pyr's that were problem dogs and didn't do their job. You shouldn't have to deal with their dogs anymore than they had to deal with yours; either the dogs stay with their goats and do their job or you should get animal control to deal with the dogs on your place. My bet is if they'll keep their goats on their place that the dogs will have no reason to be around your place.

Last edited by sunsprit; 07-23-2015 at 06:20 AM..
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Old 07-23-2015, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,540 posts, read 55,453,855 times
Reputation: 32261
stuck, your problem is with the landlord and the only "win" would be for you to move. Anything you do could motivate the landlord to raise your rent and force you out. However, if the livestock is not being fed enough, you have a responsibility of reporting that to animal control or the sheriff. 30 or 40 head of cattle on that small a grazing area absolutely requires that they buy and bring in hay. Rule of thumb on cattle is one unit per 2 acres minimum if there is no additional feed. Repeated mistreatment of animals can land a farmer in jail.
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