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Old 10-06-2009, 12:22 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
This issue with high rural output by surrounding neighbors directly impacted my parents decision regarding a possible purchase of a house in a RURAL TOWN of 700 people in New Hampshire. The house in question was in what I would call a "rural neighborhood with heavy treecover." The house across the street from the property they were thinking about purchasing literally had 8-10 light fixtures on including 3-4 on an antique barn. The fixtures also contained multiple bulbs. Needless to say, they nixed the deal based on the extreme light pollution of a possible neighbor. Some people really should stay in the city where few people mind light pollution. In addition, this town of 700 people has no crime, no diversity, and has a very high household income.

Apparently you are confusing the terms--"rural" and "small town"

The title of this thread is ---Rural and Small Town Living

There is a big difference from living in a rural area and living in a town that just happens to be surrounded by rural areas.

There is a reason people living in small towns have a city address ( or PO box) and people living in a rural area had a Rural Route address.
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Old 10-06-2009, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Maine
7,728 posts, read 11,133,165 times
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We're a bit rural, on 20 acres in a town of 85 people. We have motion sensor security lights. We also turn on the flood light on the deck before taking the dog out at night. There are bears in the area along with other critters (particularly skunks) that I don't want to bump into in the dark.
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Old 10-06-2009, 03:48 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,262,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post

You rural folks telling me that your neighbors lights ( not directly aimed at you) can reach your place and affect you is laughable.
Clearly you don't have a clue what light pollution is, other than something to make snide comments about.
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Old 10-06-2009, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,480 posts, read 38,390,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Clearly you don't have a clue what light pollution is, other than something to make snide comments about.
And this in spite of links provided for educational purposes just so everyone would be discussing on the same page.
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Old 10-06-2009, 06:03 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
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Never realized there were that many people spending that much time --star gazing

I imagine that is the favorite pastime in Roswel Mew Mexico also.
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Old 10-06-2009, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,484 posts, read 3,385,197 times
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"secerity"? oh lordy .. thats what a dog is for.. it is silly to have the overdone lights in the country .. I live in a very small town and the lights there are mimnal so I can enjoy the stars with my dogs next to me I moved futher out of the big city just so I could enjoy the dark!..
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Old 10-07-2009, 12:18 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,853 posts, read 30,791,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Get real !

Have any of you ever driven a car ?

Even with your headlights on bright there is only so far in the distance that is lit up.

You rural folks telling me that your neighbors lights ( not directly aimed at you) can reach your place and affect you is laughable.

Gosh, maybe I should complain to my neighbor ( 3/4 miles away)
He had the nerve to put up a 90 ft silo that blocks my view of the horizon if I stand at a certain place on my land.

The nerve of him ! (sarc)
I will answer your post, although I have a feeling that you won't read it, or if you do, you won't agree.

A person's eyes are EXTREMELY sensitive to changes in light. This can best be illustrated by allowing your eyes to "adjust" to the dark, covering one eye and then turning on a very bright light. If you then turn the light off and compare the quality of vision between the two eyes (one at a time) you will see that the light has reduced the quality of the vision in the exposed eye. The same is true with light pollution. Your eyes are never allowed to fully adjust to the darkness and as a result the quality of night vision that you have is dramatically reduced.

Many people would not consider this a problem and not care. We have been conditioned to believe that you cannot see in the dark anyway, so what does it matter? This is incorrect. People have an extraordinary capacity to see in the dark - and not just stars either.

Being a night owl myself, I spend a lot of time outside at night. There are some flowers that are beautiful in the moonlight. The silhouette of trees against a cloudy sky that is backlit by the moon, or the reflections of stars in a pond at night - and please! let's not forget fireflies!

In addition, the sky is unbelievable in a dark environment. If you can honestly say that you can look up into the heavens and seeing the sight of a billion stars does not move you - then you have no soul! Losing even a FRACTION of that is a tragedy beyond description.

If you think what I am saying is wrong or untrue or preposterous, then I encourage you to drive out to the country on a lonely dirt road somewhere, marmac, and on a crystal clear night and gaze into the sky.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:20 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I will answer your post, although I have a feeling that you won't read it, or if you do, you won't agree.

A person's eyes are EXTREMELY sensitive to changes in light. This can best be illustrated by allowing your eyes to "adjust" to the dark, covering one eye and then turning on a very bright light. If you then turn the light off and compare the quality of vision between the two eyes (one at a time) you will see that the light has reduced the quality of the vision in the exposed eye. The same is true with light pollution. Your eyes are never allowed to fully adjust to the darkness and as a result the quality of night vision that you have is dramatically reduced.

Many people would not consider this a problem and not care. We have been conditioned to believe that you cannot see in the dark anyway, so what does it matter? This is incorrect. People have an extraordinary capacity to see in the dark - and not just stars either.


Being a night owl myself, I spend a lot of time outside at night. There are some flowers that are beautiful in the moonlight. The silhouette of trees against a cloudy sky that is backlit by the moon, or the reflections of stars in a pond at night - and please! let's not forget fireflies!

In addition, the sky is unbelievable in a dark environment. If you can honestly say that you can look up into the heavens and seeing the sight of a billion stars does not move you - then you have no soul! Losing even a FRACTION of that is a tragedy beyond description.

If you think what I am saying is wrong or untrue or preposterous, then I encourage you to drive out to the country on a lonely dirt road somewhere, marmac, and on a crystal clear night and gaze into the sky.

20yrsinBranson

Skip the lecturing.
I have lived on a farm all my life ( 64 years) and have spent more time outside at night than most of you. Bringing cows home from the grazing strips before dawn in the morning, closing the grazing gates after milking at night etc

Working outside before and after sunrise and sunset is/was a normal every day occurence.

I don't have to be sitting in a lawn chair gazing into a starlit sky to enjoy it.

I can enjoy it while walking from the barn at night or walking to the pastures long after sunset.

I still reinterate what I said-----------if my neighbors' lights are not shinig on my property, it is none of my business.

Since I live on a farm( not on an acre lot ),it would be nearly impossible for his lights to hit my residence even if he was trying to do so on purpose.

I enjoy seeing stars at night without the need to insist my neighbors turn off all their lights so I can get further enjoyment.
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Old 10-07-2009, 08:20 AM
 
Location: New Zealand
1,872 posts, read 5,838,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Skip the lecturing.
Pot, meet kettle.

Quote:
I have lived on a farm all my life ( 64 years) and have spent more time outside at night than most of you. Bringing cows home from the grazing strips before dawn in the morning, closing the grazing gates after milking at night etc

Working outside before and after sunrise and sunset is/was a normal every day occurence.
Skip the sanctimony. You're not the only one. And even if you were, that gives you some special right to dictate what others want?

Quote:
I still reinterate what I said-----------if my neighbors' lights are not shinig on my property, it is none of my business.
If your neighbor's lights are not shining on your property/eyes, then why are you posting in this thread, which is specifically about that issue? Or do you not understand the basic properties of light and the human eye?
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Old 10-07-2009, 08:38 AM
 
19,842 posts, read 17,920,676 times
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Maybe they like moths and bugs flying around their property all night.
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