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Old 10-20-2009, 11:45 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
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Usually the person who lets his dogs run free are of the same mentality of those that let their kids run free ( 4 wheeling on other peoples land)

You might as well "talk" to a rock as to talk to a person who lets his dogs or kids run free.

They know about it, but couldn't care less and "talking" ain't gonna change anything.
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Old 10-20-2009, 12:11 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
14,530 posts, read 11,948,033 times
Reputation: 13551
Something I should add to my previous post, is that not ALL loose dogs get treated the same way. If they are after my horses, into my trash, or, as is often the case a feral dumped by some idiot I dispose of them with my saddle rifle. No questions asked. I have had dopey, friendly, pets wander in as well, some, sadly, dumped by their previous owners. County will come and get these, and I will call them out in such cases. We have issues with feral dogs running with coyotes, or packing up with other ferals and they are dangerous predators. Interbreeding with the yotes happens as well, and creates a formidable predator with a propensity to 'thrill kill'. When you find one of your calves or foals (or more than one) chewed up by a pack of ferals, all warm and fuzzy thoughts leave your head. Dogs should NOT be allowed to free roam. People who don't get this don't need to keep dogs. Dogs are predators. They can be far more than just a nuisance.
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Old 10-20-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: the sticks
823 posts, read 1,324,112 times
Reputation: 582
I hear ya. I understand. Fact is, I've learned a little on this forum, some good folks here, thought maybe I had the wrong attitude, and somebody had the perfect solution, no harm askin'. Thanks to all ...
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Old 10-20-2009, 02:48 PM
 
Location: In a chartreuse microbus
3,857 posts, read 5,383,314 times
Reputation: 8037
burr, it'd be easier to offer a solution if you weren't dealing with a no-win situation. You're not causing the problem, just being forced to live with it. There's only one way to solve it, like the others have said. Wait until one of those dogs meets up with a porcupine, skunk, or worse. But that probably won't even change his mind. Good luck to you.
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Old 10-20-2009, 04:22 PM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,307,352 times
Reputation: 15082
This topic of folks allowing their dogs to run free has been well covered recently on a number of forums.

The bottom line is your property is out in a remote area of the county where services are limited, such as animal control. That leaves animal control up to you and your dog-owning neighbor.

If your neighbor cannot or will not be a responsible pet owner, then you have no choice but to do what you can within the limits of the law. You'll need to check on your local statutes to see what they allow.

In our case, in rural Wyoming, everybody knows (except for the citiots that move in on a little parcel and think they can let their dogs be a problem for everybody else) that their dog will be shot on others properties. Yeah, it's not entirely the dog's fault being a dog ... but when you are a livestock owner and see your property being destroyed for "fun" by a stray dog, you must do what is necessary.

I've been down that path of politely advising new neighbors that their dogs are a problem, and gotten a lot of cra* from them about their right to let the dogs run free ... after all, we're "out in the country now". A few times, I've asked a deputy to go by and let the folks know that they won't have a dog if it is in my poultry, or running my sheep or horses ... and I'm not going to sit around and wait to catch it "in the act" again. If it's on my property, it's dead. And if you call the county animal control to complain about the dogs, that's what they'll tell you to do ... shoot the dog when you can.

Now this may seem pretty harsh, but even some of the citiots around here have come to understand that their dog and its behavior are their responsibility. Some, like a neighbor around here who breeds and trains $1,000-5,000 hunting dogs and used to let them run freely when he came home, now understand that even a lab retreiver can be a deadly pest to a livestock producer, or a neighbor's pets or working LGD dogs. He keeps his remaining dogs under his strict control, either kenneled or with a electric dog collar and him present when they are out of the kennel. And his threats of violence against his neighbors who might be the ones to shoot his dogs were met directly with peace warrants and the possibility of his arrest, not to mention the loss of his firearms and hunting/fishing license priveleges in this state. Even he learned that his dogs were a serious financial burden upon his neighbors, and he could be sued for the losses ... at least he paid up for my lost poultry.

You haven't seen a large dog in action until you watch them in a poultry yard kill about 30 birds in less than a minute of snapping and growling and lunging at them. Similarly, that dog "hunting" can drive away all the desirable wild animals from another person's property. When that dog "marks" it's territory, other animals do notice.

So, Burr, do what you need to do to control the problem, and don't feel sorry for the dog or the dog owner. Check with your sheriff's dept about your rights and act accordingly. You shouldn't fear for your "quiet enjoyment" of your rural land because of a local dog owner's irresponsible actions.
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Old 10-20-2009, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Fresno, CA
1,071 posts, read 1,080,404 times
Reputation: 1980
  • Find out what your county or area's loose dog ordinance is and how it's enforced. Keep a copy.
  • If you can, pen the dog(s) up.
  • Put up a found poster on the road with the dog(s) description. Indicate it was found loose on your property. List your contact info. This way the neighbor has to come to you.
  • When he comes to retrieve the dog, tell him what problems the dog(s) have caused you. Indicate you aren't inclined to shoot animals but, in addition to your own property issues, you were concerned the dogs will get hit on the road or that someone else might shoot them if they were running loose on other properties.
  • In a helpful, neighborly, non-threatening way let him know the loose dog ordinance especially if there is a shoot-to-kill allowance in your area.
  • Tell him there's no charge for the dog food... but that you would appreciate his paying for the steak his dog took from your grill.
  • Let him know that if you see the dogs running loose again you will put them up if you can and call him.
  • Then do it.
  • This way he will hear from you everytime and sometimes have to come retrieve them.
  • After a couple of times having to come retrieve them, he'll probably grow tired of this. Keep it friendly.
  • Keep a list of everytime/date the dogs are running loose on your property. That way if you have to take further legal steps, you have all your ducks in a row.
  • I would also get a copy of your county's ordinance for the dirt bikes. In my county there is a prohibition against riding them within 1/2 mile of an occupied home or a residential area.

Good luck!
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:01 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,088 posts, read 22,602,664 times
Reputation: 9373
Laws vary by state but generally you can shoot dogs like that on your property, especially if they are attacking wildlife. The states dominated by bunny huggers are where you need to be careful.

A supersoaker filled with skunk essence (available from trapping suppliers) might solve the problem but beware of any laws concerning it.
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:28 PM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,307,352 times
Reputation: 15082
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollyblythe View Post
  • Find out what your county or area's loose dog ordinance is and how it's enforced. Keep a copy.
  • If you can, pen the dog(s) up.
  • Put up a found poster on the road with the dog(s) description. Indicate it was found loose on your property. List your contact info. This way the neighbor has to come to you.
  • When he comes to retrieve the dog, tell him what problems the dog(s) have caused you. Indicate you aren't inclined to shoot animals but, in addition to your own property issues, you were concerned the dogs will get hit on the road or that someone else might shoot them if they were running loose on other properties.
  • In a helpful, neighborly, non-threatening way let him know the loose dog ordinance especially if there is a shoot-to-kill allowance in your area.
  • Tell him there's no charge for the dog food... but that you would appreciate his paying for the steak his dog took from your grill.
  • Let him know that if you see the dogs running loose again you will put them up if you can and call him.
  • Then do it.
  • This way he will hear from you everytime and sometimes have to come retrieve them.
  • After a couple of times having to come retrieve them, he'll probably grow tired of this. Keep it friendly.
  • Keep a list of everytime/date the dogs are running loose on your property. That way if you have to take further legal steps, you have all your ducks in a row.
  • I would also get a copy of your county's ordinance for the dirt bikes. In my county there is a prohibition against riding them within 1/2 mile of an occupied home or a residential area.

Good luck!
Gosh, molly, that twelve-step program for a "keep it friendly" approach to animal control sounds so warm, so loving, and so nice ... but it's failing to accomplish the purpose.

I've personally rounded up one of the most lovable Great Pyr's that was visiting from a neigbor's place 5 miles away from our property ... to feed upon my guinea hens, and then my chickens ... and taken it to the pound in town. That represented a 70 mile round trip for me, which was more than a simple inconvenience of time and expenses. Every time I took the dog in, the pound notified the dog owner who paid the fines and retrieved his dog. The resolution of that dog was when it cleaned out my entire guinea hen flock (over 100 birds) and we processed all of our remaining chickens, then the dog started to visit another neighbor's place. Only he wasn't going to put up with the problem, and shot the dog at the first opportunity when he saw his chickens dead in his yard.

I guess my basic problem with your friendly approach to the dog problem is the fallacy that most people who let their dogs run loose in rural areas give a dam* about their responsibilities. Most tend to be openly hostile about asserting "their rights" to inflict damage via their dogs upon others. In short, there is no "keep in friendly" language that will not result in an angry confrontation from the dog owner (even if you are polite and calm and respectful to the utmost) ... they've already asserted their position in less than friendly terms.

These situations are generally only resolved when the dog owner leaves with their dogs or the dogs are removed. It's rare that somebody acknowledges that they were in the wrong about their assumptions that it was OK (and even legal) to allow their dogs to be a nuisance to other folks.

It's more than a simple inconvenience, too. My wife has almost put her car or truck in the ditch numerous times trying to avoid territorial dogs running loose along the county roads in our area. She doesn't want to hurt the dogs by running into them, so when they dart out into the road, she's on the brakes and darting all over the road to avoid the dog(s). Fortunately, we have other neighbors who aren't so considerate ... and you'll find the dogs in the road after they've been run over. My wife's safety on public roads is more important to me than those dogs running loose ....

And, I think you've totally missed the point that a neigbor's dogs running loose run off the wildlife from another person's property. The OP's situation is in a rural area, not a suburb or urban environment.
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:57 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,444 times
Reputation: 1506
Here in Maine where we are a "Right to Farm State", the dog could be shot for killing livestock...no questions asked. Even then I still stick with the rule of 3 s's.

Shoot, shovel and shut up
.

I was 5 years old when I learned a hard but valuable lesson. My grandfather had sheep and we kept having lambs come up missing. One day as we fixed the tractor my Dalmatian was running across the field with a lamb in its mouth. My Grandfather yelled for the rifle, and my Grandmother fetched one quick. That is because on a farm when you yell for a rifle, you don't ask questions.

The dog never made it to the end of the field.

My Grandfather didn't apologize, nor did he hold back on my account. My dog was killing sheep that helped feed the family and kept the farm going. If an animal doesn't know its role, or does not contribute, then its not going to be on the farm. That is a tough lesson to learn when you are 5, but I can honestly say after 35 years of life on this planet, and plenty of animals, livestock or pets, I have never had one get out of hand. I have never passed a problem animal off to anyone else.

The ironic thing is, even on this forum I have been told by many that I should not have animals, but I find it strange that my style of farming has not bothered a soul...and my dogs don't even have collars let alone crates or runs. They are free to run around...they just know their roles. They are farm dogs, they live the life most dogs dream of, but they have to know the rules.
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Old 10-20-2009, 06:21 PM
 
Location: USA
137 posts, read 437,642 times
Reputation: 64
Do you have a fence?
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