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Old 10-26-2009, 06:30 PM
 
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---" I think it's close to saturation at this point"--

I agree .

When customers are leaving farmers markets empty handed cuz everything got sold out, I would disagree.

However, in many areas, it is the producer who is loading up about 1/3 of what he brought there and hauling it back home cuz there was more supply than demand.

Also, people see a sign along a patch of field corn----$2.50 per dozen---and presume that person sold his entire crop for that price.

Not true!

They only sold what buyers bought on a day to day business.

The daily sweet corn that didn't get sold at the end of the day got fed to the hogs.
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Old 10-27-2009, 06:36 AM
 
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and the hogs that ate the leftover sweet corn need to be sold to the sweet corn customers. you need to create a system where nothing goes to waste.
i sell at farmers markets that are thriving. the growers sell as much as they can cart down there. theory is that if you sell out, you didn't bring enough. if all the farmers are carting too much home from market, a market is mis-managed. you can't have more farmers than customers.
i live 80 miles from detroit, which is my local market. tens of thousands of consumers who eat every day go through the market every saturday and buy from hundreds of stalls. my regional market, which i have only slightly expanded into, goes 500 miles and includes chicago and new york city. yes, even my little farm (on occasion) has delivered black beans by the truck-load to NYC and wheat to flour mills in maine and kentucky and ohio. and we're talking our 24 foot market truck, not a pickup.
and, i am not ignoring the market right outside my door. plans are in the works to start a delivery route. we are planning to put someone on the road for a ten-hour day to deliver to small stores, restaurants and coffee shops within roughly 30 miles of the farm.
everyone buys food every week. why shouldn't they buy it from me?
oh, and if you stay into sheep, some friends of mine were having trouble making ends meet just from the income from selling their sheep. they started getting some of the hides processed with the fur on, bought a commercial sewing machine and started making slippers and vests and mittens out of the hides instead of selling them cheap. the husband would wear his vest and mitts all winter, which was enough to get people to ask..."where did you get that..." ca-ching.
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Old 10-27-2009, 09:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thebreadlady View Post
and the hogs that ate the leftover sweet corn need to be sold to the sweet corn customers. you need to create a system where nothing goes to waste.
i sell at farmers markets that are thriving. the growers sell as much as they can cart down there. theory is that if you sell out, you didn't bring enough. if all the farmers are carting too much home from market, a market is mis-managed. you can't have more farmers than customers.
i live 80 miles from detroit, which is my local market. tens of thousands of consumers who eat every day go through the market every saturday and buy from hundreds of stalls. my regional market, which i have only slightly expanded into, goes 500 miles and includes chicago and new york city. yes, even my little farm (on occasion) has delivered black beans by the truck-load to NYC and wheat to flour mills in maine and kentucky and ohio. and we're talking our 24 foot market truck, not a pickup.
and, i am not ignoring the market right outside my door. plans are in the works to start a delivery route. we are planning to put someone on the road for a ten-hour day to deliver to small stores, restaurants and coffee shops within roughly 30 miles of the farm.
everyone buys food every week. why shouldn't they buy it from me?
oh, and if you stay into sheep, some friends of mine were having trouble making ends meet just from the income from selling their sheep. they started getting some of the hides processed with the fur on, bought a commercial sewing machine and started making slippers and vests and mittens out of the hides instead of selling them cheap. the husband would wear his vest and mitts all winter, which was enough to get people to ask..."where did you get that..." ca-ching.
Of course they are getting feed for their pigs, but they sure as heck aren't getting the profit of $2.50 a dozen corn when they do that.

Imagine what the price of that pork would be if it was fed $2.50 a dozen corn ?
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Old 10-27-2009, 09:11 AM
 
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Originally Posted by thebreadlady View Post
we are full time farmers and 90% of the things we produce on our 200 acre farm has been sold at the local farmers market on saturdays, year-round, for the past 20 years. before that we farmed 1000 acres, sold only milk and went broke at about the age you are now. (flood year, followed by a drought year, no feed equals no milk equals bankruptcy)
diversity is the key to our survival, and our local customers. added value products help, too. more money is there to be made on flour and bread than a bushel of wheat.
the more things you have to sell on the table, the more you will sell. don't just sell a bag of black beans for soup, sell them cornmeal and eggs to make the cornbread to go with it. don't just sell a chicken, but the potatoes and onions to cook it with. and don't forget a loaf of bread.

-----" no feed equals no milk equals bankrupcy"--

---IF--you are saying you filed bankruptcy and are very successful now, have you ever thought about the local businesses people that you stiffed when you filed bankruptcy ?
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Old 10-27-2009, 06:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
-----" no feed equals no milk equals bankrupcy"--

---IF--you are saying you filed bankruptcy and are very successful now, have you ever thought about the local businesses people that you stiffed when you filed bankruptcy ?
now why would you believe that?
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Old 10-27-2009, 08:18 PM
 
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Maybe because you used the word--" bankruptcy"--in your post about going broke years back. ")
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Old 10-28-2009, 07:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Maybe because you used the word--" bankruptcy"--in your post about going broke years back. ")
sir, you assume too much. and, you are off-topic.
bt, i apologize that your thread was hijacked.
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Old 10-28-2009, 08:31 AM
 
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When an individual files bankruptcy, it usually sticks it to banks and credit card companies.

When a farmer files bankruptcy, the local veterinarian,the local feed store, the local fuel delivery guy, the local breeder, the neighbor you owe land rent to,--------those locals all get stiffed.
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Old 10-28-2009, 08:39 AM
 
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Since the question was on buying land, there was good advice in the magazine--" The Furrow"--------published by John Deere.

They stated land has always been a good investment.

Here is a very good quote------" It's always a good time to buy land if your business plan requires land and you can afford it "

--"If you don't have a good business plan and can't afford it, then it's a bad time "

In my lifetime, I have bought land next to me even though I didn't have a good plan for it, but I could afford it.

I , also, have passed up land next to me cuz despite a great,detailed, plan, I could not afford it.
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Old 10-28-2009, 10:04 AM
 
263 posts, read 670,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
When an individual files bankruptcy, it usually sticks it to banks and credit card companies.

When a farmer files bankruptcy, the local veterinarian,the local feed store, the local fuel delivery guy, the local breeder, the neighbor you owe land rent to,--------those locals all get stiffed.
at the cost of being redundant, sir, you are still assuming too much. and, your personal attack is off the topic of making a farm more profitable.
you leave me no out. if i deny your accusations, you will then likely call me a liar. if i ignore your accusations, you will assume they are true and that i am a thief.
have a nice life.
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