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Old 10-28-2009, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,777 posts, read 7,193,948 times
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I have a neighbor in my suburban community that keeps a couple goats for pets. He loves 'em! He maintains a 10' x 15' or so pen and lets them out like dogs in the yard occasionally. I'm not sure of the breed or age. They seem to be fairly well behaved, but knowing a goats reputation for mischief, I would say that has to do with the efficeint fencing and theeir particularly good dispositions. They do have distinct personalities , you know, and real dominance issues!
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Old 10-28-2009, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,121 posts, read 27,054,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
My neighbor had goats for awhile and this is how he "trained" them to stay in:

He strung an electric fence around them and tied pieces of ribbon to the wire. After they'd been bitten enough times to avoid the fence, he took it down and tied those ribbons onto tree limbs, other fences or anyplace else he didn't want the goats to go.

Having been conditioned by the electric fence, they never ventured past ribbons again.
I had a friend who tried that with his goats... within a few days they figured it out and destroyed part of his orchard. I think you'd be surprised at the intelligence of some goats. My dairy goats never fell for the electric fence, they always figured out a way around it.
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Old 10-29-2009, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
22,860 posts, read 22,276,062 times
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Quote:
Sheep are stupid. Goats are intelligent, inquisitive, empathetic and make loyal companions.
Most days I wouldnt refer to my goats as intelligent. When I have to get their heads unstruck from the fense or convience them to get out of the feeder so I can feed them. LOL.

When I got my first, a billy, he keep jumping the 5 foot fense and I had to run electric wire around the top to keep him in.

I am new to goats, tho I have had horses for 18 yrs. Definately an experience. I went with mixed dairy goats because I want fresh milk and cheese. Most ppl in my area raise boar goats or pygmy brush goats to keep their pastures clean.

My last little nannie is a mini lamancha (nigerian/lamancha mix). I was told she will be a small goat. She is a real sweety, but I do prefer the long ears of the nubians.

Aptor, let us know what you go with.
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Old 10-29-2009, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,121 posts, read 27,054,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2mares View Post
Most days I wouldnt refer to my goats as intelligent. When I have to get their heads unstruck from the fense or convience them to get out of the feeder so I can feed them. LOL.

When I got my first, a billy, he keep jumping the 5 foot fense and I had to run electric wire around the top to keep him in.

I am new to goats, tho I have had horses for 18 yrs. Definately an experience. I went with mixed dairy goats because I want fresh milk and cheese. Most ppl in my area raise boar goats or pygmy brush goats to keep their pastures clean.

My last little nannie is a mini lamancha (nigerian/lamancha mix). I was told she will be a small goat. She is a real sweety, but I do prefer the long ears of the nubians.

Aptor, let us know what you go with.
We had a buck (he was a French Alpine) who tipped the scale at about 270 lbs. Basically, he bent a horse size pole barn in more than one place, tore the gate off the hinges (this was a stout mare motel...nearly brand new), and ran through a 2x4 fence WITH no climb fencing attached to it like it was nothing. You do NOT want to mess with a full size buck in rut.

He lived to the ripe old age of 14, and gave us problems up until the day he passed away. We kept him because he had the habit of throwing the most amazing kids I'd ever seen... Won us more GCH ribbons than we knew what to do with
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Old 10-29-2009, 04:00 PM
 
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JetJockey...I had a Ram do that very thing a few weeks ago. For three days in a row he lowered his head and charged the sheep shed he was in and was able to bust through solid 1 inch boards on his way out. Each time a fence held him in while I repaired the building, but on the third day he made it to the outer fence. That would not have stopped that double-skulled head of his, but a .44 Mag bullet between the eyes certainly did. That pure bred Hampshire clocked in at 300 pounds.

Like your buck, he was a nice sheep and sired a lot of good lambs but I'm not having a nasty animal on this farm.
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Old 10-29-2009, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,121 posts, read 27,054,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
JetJockey...I had a Ram do that very thing a few weeks ago. For three days in a row he lowered his head and charged the sheep shed he was in and was able to bust through solid 1 inch boards on his way out. Each time a fence held him in while I repaired the building, but on the third day he made it to the outer fence. That would not have stopped that double-skulled head of his, but a .44 Mag bullet between the eyes certainly did. That pure bred Hampshire clocked in at 300 pounds.

Like your buck, he was a nice sheep and sired a lot of good lambs but I'm not having a nasty animal on this farm.

We almost got rid of our Benjamin (the buck) on more than one occasion... but he was a complete sweetheart when he wasn't in rut. Just those few months he was a monster. Worth it in my eyes... he was the grandsire of two national ADGA Champions.
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Old 11-04-2009, 08:01 PM
 
Location: California
35 posts, read 149,356 times
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I've only had a couple of year's experience with my daughter's FFA project goats, but I've found them to be remarkable animals with loads of personality and intelligence. If you've successfully cared for other livestock and pets, you should have no problem learning what goats need and how to provide them with what they need.

I've never had Nigerian Dwarf goats, but that's the breed I'd look at if you want a small, elegant dairy goat. They come in many different colors and have the reputation of being gentle and easily managed. There are loads of "goat people" online who can answer any specific questions you might have. Good luck to you.
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Old 11-06-2009, 10:45 AM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,307,352 times
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Goat breeds vary greatly in their temperament and "wild" ways ...

Our angoras are very docile and content to stay in their corrals with modest fencing requirements as long as the fences are intact, about 5' high sheep mesh wire fences.

Our Boers would test every inch of a fence every day, and they'd work a fence so hard that it would break in spots. They'd get out and eat every piece of living vegetation, trees, shrubs, garden ... in sight. Fix the fence, round up the goats ... and they'd make a beeline for the last place they got out. They've got great memories, are persistent, and will work a fence or jump it just for the fun of it. The only folks I know who kept Boers in had concreted in their corrals and set chain link fences into the concrete and built them 8' high.

We've got Nubians and other milking breeds, just a couple of each. Some are very personable and pet quality, but they still take every opportunity to get loose and eat all the shrubs and gardens and trees that they can. An hour or so in the tomato patch and the tomatoes, then the corn, then the peas, then the beans ... plus a cucumber or two ... will get destroyed. The don't eat just one plant and get satisfied, they take a couple of nibbles here, a few nibbles there, try a couple of young trees, then back to the shrubs ....

LaMancha's didn't work out for us, too high strung and not friendly at all. Boers were far more trouble than they were worth, although we did make money on the young ones for slaughter at the sale barn. Angoras work for us because we do all our own shearing and my wife processes the fiber and spins and dyes it for a number of handweavers in the area who pay top dollar for her product.

Our sheep have been a much better investment, and we're raising meat breeds for local sales with more demand than we can keep up with. We select for mellow temperaments, and even our rams can be handled ... although I never turn my back on them when in the corrals. But all of our ewes are very pet-like, come seeking attention and petting and treats, and can be handled. The ones that didn't make that criteria went to the sale barn, and the lambs that the good natured ewes through tend to be of the same temperament. We've been expanding our flock through our own breeding program as well as buying additional ewes from others, or rams from across the country to vary the genetics.

I'd take sheep any day over the goats. Both are reasonably easy to care for, but the sheep are far more dollar productive for us on our ranch and can be left to "roam" our pastures ... while the goats require more attention and must be fenced in.
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