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Old 10-31-2009, 09:46 PM
 
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We live in the country, and we also have a cat. Our yard has a great deal less gopher trails and he is also a great mouser.

I think cats have a great instinct, but when they enter the wilds, they are also subject to Nature's Laws. Such is life. And oddly enough.. we still have songbirds.

In fact, we put out seed into some hanging planters for the birds.

We have several coyote packs around our house and they can get pretty close to the house at night. We also have three dogs, two inisde and at least one outside GSD.

We know a man from the city who was walking his dachsund ON A LEASH down the country road and a coyote came out and tried to attack his dachsund! Now, that's pretty scary.
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Old 11-01-2009, 05:10 AM
 
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Sunspirit and FBKeeper...

I think one major reason why domestic dogs can keep the coyotes at bay is because Maine allows hunting coyote with dogs. I am not sure if this holds true where FBK lives, but several times a week the "boys" get together and run their dogs so they can hunt coyotes. We have a summer home down on the coast in Port Clyde and they hunt dogs with coyotes there too, so it is a common hunting practice in many parts of Maine.

So for a coyote here, when a dog is barking is is most likely running them down. That is why I think they get a little skittish around dogs and around people's houses with dogs around here. It also explains why in other places a coyote will walk right up to an LGD...they know the LGD won't really do a whole lot, where as the dogs here are likely to chase them half way across the county while gun toting hunters tossing lead at them when they cross the roads or get in the fields. As I said I think that is why they are skittish around any dogs.

But the coyotes are here. Last year alone they dog hunted 31 coyotes and trapped another 40 for a total of 71 coyotes on my place alone. Yet despite this number, in all the years we have raised sheep, we have never lost a sheep to coyotes. Perhaps some day I will have to invest in a LGD, but for the intrim the dogs I have for pets, and the Holstein bulls I have co-grazing with the sheep seem to keep them protected. With the heavy hunting pressure from the local boys, this seems to work quite nicely for us.
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
Sunspirit and FBKeeper...

I think one major reason why domestic dogs can keep the coyotes at bay is because Maine allows hunting coyote with dogs. I am not sure if this holds true where FBK lives, but several times a week the "boys" get together and run their dogs so they can hunt coyotes. We have a summer home down on the coast in Port Clyde and they hunt dogs with coyotes there too, so it is a common hunting practice in many parts of Maine.

So for a coyote here, when a dog is barking is is most likely running them down. That is why I think they get a little skittish around dogs and around people's houses with dogs around here. It also explains why in other places a coyote will walk right up to an LGD...they know the LGD won't really do a whole lot, where as the dogs here are likely to chase them half way across the county while gun toting hunters tossing lead at them when they cross the roads or get in the fields. As I said I think that is why they are skittish around any dogs.

But the coyotes are here. Last year alone they dog hunted 31 coyotes and trapped another 40 for a total of 71 coyotes on my place alone. Yet despite this number, in all the years we have raised sheep, we have never lost a sheep to coyotes. Perhaps some day I will have to invest in a LGD, but for the intrim the dogs I have for pets, and the Holstein bulls I have co-grazing with the sheep seem to keep them protected. With the heavy hunting pressure from the local boys, this seems to work quite nicely for us.
I agree.

I do not hunt with dogs, but we have neighbors that do.

I am sure that it has some effect on the population of coyote.
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Old 11-01-2009, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
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I found it funny, after we moved in here, to listen to the coyotes sing, making a circuitous route to studiously avoid every property that had a Great Pyrenees on it. (The GP's sing back, no doubt something very rude.) We did have a neighbor move in who thought it was a good idea to kill coyotes and hang the carcasses on the fence to "warn off" the others, but he only did that the first year, I think the other neighbors set him straight on that one.

Before we moved out here, we boarded our horses on 30 acres that had 5 big dogs, including one GP. There were coyotes around, but they never came on the property - you could see them sitting ont he other side of the fence, but they never came over.

Then the Great Pyrenees was sent off somewhere else for six months. The coyotes promptly, ignoring the existence of the other big dogs (including a Rottweiler), promptly started coming across the fence, killing cats, etc. When the GP came back, they were back across the fence, respectfully keeping their toes OFF of her property.

Like I said, there seems to be a time-honored "arrangement" between GPs and coyotes.
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Old 11-02-2009, 05:47 PM
 
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Here in SE Wyoming, I know of several "professional" coyote hunters who use dogs to track down and flush out the coyotes, so the coyotes do "know" that dogs hunt them. Most of them use greyhounds.

I've not seen good results with Great Pyr's as LGD's in our area. The don't stay with their flocks, they roam a lot (as in come over to visit our poultry appetizer selection), and they don't seem to bother with the predators around here. German Shepherds don't seem to do a good job except for property watchdogs, but aren't LGD's and don't stay with "their" flocks.

OTOH, Maremma's and Akbash seem to "get it", and are used quite a bit around here for LGD work. Ours will chase off coyotes from the area around our sheep and goats and poultry, and will kill coyotes if they remain around the place as a threat. We generally find the remains of the coyotes in the pastures when we're checking fences.

Over the years, it seems like our LGD's have eliminated the adult coyotes that were working over our place, but each year there is a "new" bunch of young coyotes seeking to find their territory and they haven't learned about LGD's until they encounter a few of them. The pups either are chased off to easier feeding grounds or are killed by our LGD's. Still, it's a lot of anxious nights each year for us when we hear the coyotes singing so very close to where we know our livestock is staying.

Even with Llamas out in the pastures, the coyotes can be very intimidating to their prey animals. Sometimes, when a new den crops up along our creek, our livestock can sense the predator threat and will not stay or go to various pastures until the threat is removed.
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Old 11-02-2009, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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The Great Pyr that we had needed more room than we could give him.

His previous owners had ran him each day jogging on pavement, so for us, he refused to really run in the forest. He insisted that he had to run on the yellow line on pavement. 2 or 3 miles and he would turn around and come home again.

It frightened folks out driving. The dog never got hit by a car, and if a car stopped he was always friendly and would drool on the person's hand, if a hand was extended, before continuing his run. He had to get that run completed each day.

Then one day he was out with me in the woods near our road, when a neighbor was out jogging pushing a baby carriage. She lives a mile away, and I think likes to jog 5 miles or so each day. The Great Pyr went crazy on the baby carriage, barking and growling, hair standing up.

The Great Pyr refused to back down, when I got there he retreated in the woods. But as the jogger continued 100 yards on down the road, the Great Pyr came back out of the woods and recommenced his barking and growling at the baby carriage. I ended up escorting the jogger and her baby back to their home.

When I got home the Great Pyr was waiting for me.

A Great Pyr needs a certain type of training and environment. The previous owners of this Great Pyr were not the correct situation, and we were not the correct situation for helping that dog.
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Old 11-20-2009, 05:45 PM
 
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If there are any coyotes around, your cats are in danger. Cats are like candy to coyotes. Never let your cats outside when it starts to get dark outside. I let mine out for short periods during the day when we are closeby and when the dog is out, too. Safest to put your cats on leash.
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Old 11-23-2009, 01:52 PM
 
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We have "barn cats"...always a fresh supply of appetizers for the coyotes!
Actually, the oldest has made it 9 years, but due to the bigger critters around, there is quite a turn over. We've never to my knowledge lost one to a snake, and we have copperheads, rattlers and cottonmouths here, so I wouldn't worry too much about cats and snakes.

No one in this area (Middle Tennessee) hunts coyotes with dogs that I know of, nor did they when I made college money hunting them in the PNW, but they avoid my place and my dog. He is kind of a big boy, though...a 95 pound slow, calm mutt.

Where I am now, many folks put some donkies in with their cows/goats and have great success with them keeping the coyotes away from them.
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Old 12-08-2009, 11:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Do not overfeed farm/country cats or they will become lazy and tiun into poor " mousers".

A cat that is a good " mouser" is valuable in a rural area and I never would shoot one.

This is a wive's tale. A hungry cat is not necessarily a good mouser and a well fed cat is not necessarily a poor one. In fact, I'm of the opinion that the cat that is better condition (I didn't say a butterball) is a better mouser than some scrawny thing.

Keep your cats fed. The cat that isn't getting fed is the one who goes to visit the neighbors. We milk and I honestly believe all the cats within two mile radius can smell the stuff because there is many a morning when our cats have visitors at their milk pan.

I have no problem with thinning down the population of neighborhood cats if they decide to hang around as too many cats on one place brings trouble.

Too, in our area, if a dog wanders onto a neighbors place, he's a goner. I myself would have a hard time killing a dog unless I caught it killing poultry or worrying sheep but some will shoot a dog just for being on their side of the fence, and I can't really say I blame them. A person needs to train their dog to stay home and remember the old rule: "Two dogs is NO dog."
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Old 12-08-2009, 11:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bestemor View Post
If there are any coyotes around, your cats are in danger. Cats are like candy to coyotes. Never let your cats outside when it starts to get dark outside. I let mine out for short periods during the day when we are closeby and when the dog is out, too. Safest to put your cats on leash.

Your're right, Grandma. Coyotes love dogs too. Our neighbor had a big old police dog who was about ten years old and the coyotes enticed him out one night and made short order of him.

We've a good border collie on patrol, but the coyotes are so darn bold that one night I went out to close the chicken house and here was one about 25 miles from me, beside the silo and we just stood there and stared at eachother before he took off. Old June wanted to give chase but I called her back. I wish they'd put a bounty on them again to thin the population down. A lot of sheep in our state are lost to the varmits.
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