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Old 10-30-2009, 03:04 PM
 
Location: las vegas
23 posts, read 65,316 times
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Hello,
are there people/Companies that delivery water to homesteads that have no well system in Rural areas?
If so how much do they charge for that service?

Just wondering.
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Old 10-31-2009, 06:17 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john4na View Post
Hello,
are there people/Companies that delivery water to homesteads that have no well system in Rural areas?
If so how much do they charge for that service?

Just wondering.
The human body is made up of 80% water, and with the way we are now accustomed to having water for clean up, sanitation and food preparation, I think it is in anyones interest in having a home to have access to a stable supply of water on the homestead.

Now I am not saying it has to come in the traditional role of an electric pump shoving it through copper pipes and and into sinks and toilets, oh no. We have a plethora of hand dug wells from the colonial days and they can be adequate, and Bison Pumps sells a great deep well hand pump that could get water to the surface in a variety of well configurations. Even if you use a privy, water for making meals, taking baths and other sanitation is just about a necessity. Even with conservation, hauling in water as you suggest would prohibitively expensive.

In my opinion, staking a homestead where there is no retrievable water is a recipe for disaster. If children are involved, DHS can legally remove the children from the home due to sanitation issues. In my opinion paying for a well or developing a water source is very cheap compared to having my children taken from me, and that is both in fiscal amounts and emotional distress. Heck before I even built my home I had the well water witched (doused) and then a well sunk. I used conventional well drilling equipment, but any well or permanent water source is better then hauling it in. It can come from one of those mini-well drillers, an old hand dug well like the settlers here in New England built, or of course a natural body of water.

Safe drinking water is ideal, but 90% of the water I use is for sanitation. I could easily buy the small amount of drinking water I drink, but there is no way I could afford to haul in the water I use for sanitation. Nor would I want to. I do not have water out in my sheep barn so I haul a fair amount of water from the house to my sheep barn in the winter, and I can tell you right now, hauling water is one of the most unpleasant tasks I have as a sheep farmer (and sheep don't require much!).

My suggestion to any homestead is thus...water is a huge aspect of life. If the proposed homestead site lacks water resources, find a different place to locate your homestead. I can almost guarantee that it will be a failure. Either from your contempt at having to haul and pay for water, or at the inconvenience of it from your spouse and children. This country is huge and land is available everywhere. Find a better place to stake your claim!
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Old 10-31-2009, 08:55 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,682,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john4na View Post
Hello,
are there people/Companies that delivery water to homesteads that have no well system in Rural areas?
If so how much do they charge for that service?

Just wondering.
Isn't that trendy phrase --" homestead"-- usually associated with " self sufficency" ?

Seems wanting to be self sufficent and depending on others to supply the very most basic necessity--water- sounds like an oxymoron when used in the same sentence.

BrokenTap offered good advice.
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Old 10-31-2009, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,237 posts, read 2,760,307 times
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You might want to ask other people in your area about this. Perhaps the could put you in touch with someone who delivrs water.When I bought my place, I paid to have water delivered, $20.00 per delivery, which lasted me a month. Not the ideal situation, and I bought bottled water for drinking and cooking, but the best I could do at the time. As soon as I could afford it, I had a well drilled. My water system was considered to be a cistern, which caused no problems with the health department. I had to conserve, but my home and children were clean.
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Old 10-31-2009, 09:49 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,091 posts, read 22,607,566 times
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That's somewhat common out West in the desert areas, but I wouldn't want to try it.
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Old 11-01-2009, 05:27 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,970 times
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I just see a well or reliable water source as a true investment and NOT in terms of money either. I built my house literally on nothing and was almost sick when the well cost me 4K, but as my dad pointed out, once that well is in, it is there forever. I think people would be better off if they just bite the bullet and sink a well or develop a water resource.

Around here, a lot of homesteaders forget this aspect of life and never realize that with so many obstacles to self sufficiency and their dream that hauling water can be the straw that breaks their backs. My town is teeming with deserted houses where back-to-the-landers have came in, only to have their wives or themselves realize life without water (or electricity) is a novel idea but not a very practical one.
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Old 11-01-2009, 08:15 AM
 
Location: CasaMo
15,587 posts, read 7,662,437 times
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It's common in many parts of the country to have water delivered on a normal basis. They build underground tanks for that purpose. Really no different than having LP gas delivered.

Hardly a reason for the kids to be taken away. That insinuation is ridiculous.
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Old 11-01-2009, 12:43 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,970 times
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I think many of you are taking that DHHS statement the wrong way. I guess it does depend on where you live, but I know here in Maine, if the child tells the teacher "we don't have running water", the DHHS system will most likely get a call to check the status of the home.

As other have said, as long as your children are clean and your home has sanitary conditions then you are fine, but one should keep in mind, not having running water is a huge red flag for the DHHS system and they are obligated to investigate. Don't blame the teacher either because they are obligated by law to report such a thing. (at least here in Maine they are).

FOR ME ANYWAY, the inconvenience of not having water plentiful, and the hassle of being investigated by DHHS, just would not be worth a measly 4K.
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Old 11-01-2009, 06:12 PM
 
Location: NOVA
4,521 posts, read 5,333,543 times
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Default Answering the original question

Quote:
Originally Posted by john4na View Post
Hello,
are there people/Companies that delivery water to homesteads that have no well system in Rural areas?
If so how much do they charge for that service?

Just wondering.
It costs $40 to haul in 2,000 gallons of water to a house near Louisville, Ky. It recently went up from $35 when fuel prices rose in 2008.

As to water usage, 2,000 gallons can last up to a month but normally lasts around 2-3 weeks depends upon use. Showers vs. tubs, number of occupants, and amount of laundry are factors.

Hauling water yourself is an option and costs $.25 cents per 100 gallons. Most of the water containers you see in the back of pickups are 300 gallons.

Water prices vary by region and to highlight this point, city water only runs about $20 to $30 a month. When I was in Texas, water bills often exceeded $200 a month using city water.
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Old 11-01-2009, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,237 posts, read 2,760,307 times
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What does having cistern water or delivered water have to do with running water? Many of the holding tanks are situated so that the water gravity feeds into the house or is pumped in. What does not having running water in the home have to do with sanitary conditions? I have known people who had to carry their water from the spring or well in buckets and some of them kept their homes a lot cleaner than some people who had running hot and cold water. Just because you have running water does not mean you are clean. Yes, having a well is so much easier, but with a little work and planning you can make do with what is at hand.
If, as you say, a teacher is obligated to call DHHS, I would hope it would be because the child is being abused or showing up dirty, not whether or not that child has running water or the family has their water delivered.
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