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Old 11-22-2009, 01:22 AM
 
784 posts, read 2,533,591 times
Reputation: 448

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasGrace View Post
No stereotypes. I'm glad you are there. There's not enough room here for everyone up there in all those high rises.

As I pass through on the turnpikes and go across the Washington Bridge and up the 95....I don't understand how folks live like that.

But then again, you guys would freak out if you had to come here and have silence, grass to mow, drive 30 miles to go to a grocery store, etc.

Neither is right or wrong...it's just different.
Yes you are correct. I've never had a lawn or backyard growing up, and I wouldn't have it any other way. Silence doesn't bother me, I would just freak out if I needed milk at 12AM and every store was closed until the next day.
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Old 11-22-2009, 09:55 AM
 
9 posts, read 58,474 times
Reputation: 22
I grew up in the suburbs. Always wanted to live in the country and moved here 16 years ago as this is where my husband was living when we married. If I didn't feel like the only open-minded person around and didn't have to deal with the small-town school and their politics I would love to stay here. Dying to move back. Can't because of several reasons-money, my kids would be uprooted, my son loves to hunt, someday they will graduate and my biggest problem will be gone. Won't have to deal with the locals at school.
As for how country folk think about city folk, if you ask my son he would say city folk are a bunch of rappers or hip-hoppers who don't hunt and don't like county music and therefore are not cool. If you ask me, I thank god for city folk because that's the only way we could have elected Obama.
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Old 11-22-2009, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
Reputation: 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCAnalyst View Post
Yes you are correct. I've never had a lawn or backyard growing up, and I wouldn't have it any other way. Silence doesn't bother me, I would just freak out if I needed milk at 12AM and every store was closed until the next day.
Do you often find that you 'need' milk at 12am?
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Old 11-22-2009, 11:22 AM
 
486 posts, read 924,614 times
Reputation: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
I've lived in big cities and now in a small town.

I love big cities for their cultural offerings and vitality. Museums, art exhibits, musicial and dance performances and ethnic restaurants and such. What I don't miss is the daily stress of too much traffic, too much noise and the proximity of too many people and cars...too much stimulation without end.

When I was younger none of these things bothered me one iota--I loved all the glitter and jitter of city life. But as I grew older, I yearned for more tranquility, simplicity, quietude, and a small circle of caring friends and community.

I wanted to walk or ride my bike most everywhere I could without fear of cars, trucks and buses mashing me to a pulp.

I wanted to hear crickets at night and not sirens, the occasional gunshot, circling helicopters, car alarms, and roaring planes overhead.

I wanted to smell pine and jasmine scent instead of automobile exhaust.

In short, what attracted me to big cities--the glitter and the jitter as a young person--is exactly what drove me away as an older person.

But for cultural offerings and the frisson of many creative minds meshing, a big city cannot be beat.

For caring community, give me a small town where everyone knows your name--and lends a helping hand when needed.

Vive la différence between towns large and small!
I agree with you that there are good things about both towns and cities big and small, but I've never understood the appeal of everyone 'knowing your name' and/or business. I guess I'm a private person, and privacy is hard to find in a small town where everyone knows each other. Where I'm from, you almost feel like you can't walk out of a grocery store with a 6-pack without it becoming some sort of gossip. Sometimes I just want to be left alone. If you took away the gossipy (and sometimes xenophobic) aspects of small towns, I think I might actually prefer them.
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