U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-04-2009, 04:43 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,208 times
Reputation: 1506

Advertisements

Maine has the toughest CNMP's in the nation, so it does not surprise me. The local ag committee of which I am a part of controls where the majority of the money goes, but 2/3 of it is required by government to go to manure related issues.

I am getting a manure storage facility next year myself. In fact the NRCS conservationist is coming over today with my just completed CNMP and the plans for the storage facility.

When I started to get into sheep 2 years ago I was often critizized by sheep farmers claiming a CNMP for sheep was not required...I was even surprised when the first thing the Gov said was they need a CNMP. As of today this is the 3rd CNMP I got on this farm due to the sheep, cows, and importation of other nutrients on this farm. It has made a huge impact on water quality though here in Maine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-07-2009, 07:07 AM
 
8,082 posts, read 11,894,254 times
Reputation: 10786
Are you worried about erosion on a 15% grade?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 10:03 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
Reputation: 8170
I'm quite sure steep fields are classified as --"HEL"--( highly erodable land ) and thus a tillage/planting plan has to be on file and approved or a farm is no longer eligoible for any govt benefits.

Soil erosion is the main reason many farmers on hilly ground have abandoned the mold board plow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 01:57 PM
 
163 posts, read 157,609 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
Its been pretty warm here, and one thing we are trying to do this year is get as much Spring time tasks done in the fall as we can. This means spreading manure before the December 1st cut-off comes up,.

I love to plow. It's the very first thing I ever got to do with the tractor other than drive the bale rack picking up bales. I was nine or ten years old when grandpa taught me how to plow. I still love it, though we don't plow as often as we used to, and this fall was the first fresh sod I've broken in ten years.

However, I'm very curious what you mean about this December 1st cut-off in hauling manure. What in the world do you mean by that?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,688,814 times
Reputation: 8303
Quote:
Originally Posted by plowman View Post
However, I'm very curious what you mean about this December 1st cut-off in hauling manure. What in the world do you mean by that?
Manure spread on frozen ground can run off and contaminate ground water more than manure spread in spring and summer.

At least those are the regulations here. If you scroll down this link to where it references winter spreading of manure, it explains how it applies here. There may be differences in Brokentap's region but the gist of it, if I'm understanding it correctly, is the same.

Here they plan to ban all winter spreading of manure by 2013.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 03:43 PM
 
163 posts, read 157,609 times
Reputation: 61
God help us!
Winter's about the only time we have to spread manure! This fall's been so wet that we're still picking corn. Manure hauling will have to come after that if the fields aren't full of snow. Thankfully we don't have those crazy laws, but I figured that was what was probably meant by the original statement.
I guess that's an advantage of living on flat land, we don't have run off of manure, but then neither do we have great drainage so when it rains, we have to live with the after affects for a while.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 04:03 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,208 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
Are you worried about erosion on a 15% grade?
Sort of. It is pretty common for us to farm grades like that, but we have best management practices to deal with any erosion. There are too many to list here, but we are a USDA CSP Farm so we have a lot of rules we have to go by in order to get that base acre subsidy.

Incidentally 15% is not that high. In Idaho they farm grades in the 40% range. It is so steep that they can't even use tractors, they have to use bulldozers due to their lower center of gravity. It is the steepest modernly farmed land in the world from what I hear.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 04:11 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,208 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by plowman View Post
God help us!
Winter's about the only time we have to spread manure! This fall's been so wet that we're still picking corn. Manure hauling will have to come after that if the fields aren't full of snow. Thankfully we don't have those crazy laws, but I figured that was what was probably meant by the original statement.
I guess that's an advantage of living on flat land, we don't have run off of manure, but then neither do we have great drainage so when it rains, we have to live with the after affects for a while.
That was one of the things that surprised me when I was in North Dakota. I innocently said, "no Maine is like around here. You can come across a stream and drink from it safely". The guy looked at me in shock.

"Oh god you can't do that here, the farm run off pollutes the streams".

It's really not a crazy law. When we spend time and money spreading our manure, we want it to go into the soil where it helps to grow our crops. If we spread on frozen ground then it would just run off. Why bother to put it out there then, why not just dump it by the truck load into the nearest stream and save some time and money. I am being silly of course, but you get my point.

CNMP's here were driven by the farmers and not by government. We did strike a deal with them though, we will do what is right, if you fund them. So far the gov has kept their end of the bargain and fund CNMP's at 60% per year. Lime, seaweed, kelp, etc is not considered a nitrate issue though so those are not regulated at all by the CNMP's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 05:51 PM
 
163 posts, read 157,609 times
Reputation: 61
Again,
We wouldn't be able to ever get the stuff hauled. When I get time I haul some on the wheat or oat stubble if we have some, but this year was so wet, that one got stuck even in stubble. Then it's disced in, but we have little runoff.
The danger in the water is more from all the chemical fertilizers than it is from the application of manure. My folks have shallow wells, actually sandpoints. All the water in that neighborhood have been high nitrate levels only since the application of chemicals. In fact, there's far less manure spread there than ever in history as the fences are all gone and no one has livestock anymore. So, so much for manure polluting the water. It's these dadgum chemicals that are killing us but the big chemical guys wouldn't want us to know that. Heck no, they encourage no till farming in the name of "soil conservation" and you end up pouring on tons of chemical fertilizers, weed killers and insecticides. We weren't nearly so bad off when we rotated our crops, spread manure, and actually tilled the soil like the Good Lord inteneded.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,688,814 times
Reputation: 8303
I got company and forgot to add the link I referenced in my post above: Livestock | Poultry | Manure Management Regulations | Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives | Province of Manitoba

Scroll down to where it references spreading manure in winter.

Manitoba is flat so it's not about hilly terrain. It's about chemicals, as Brokentap said but also the manure leaches into ditches and from there to streams and rivers. It may be worse near lakes and streams but where the problems here arose was with huge pig farms. There's just so much land and way too much pig manure.

It isn't like the old type of farming anymore where you have mixed farms using their own manure from a limited number of animals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:22 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top