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Old 11-28-2009, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,688,814 times
Reputation: 8303

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Thinking of Raising Sheep
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Old 11-29-2009, 07:47 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,091 posts, read 22,609,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
I am glad that I did not decide to retire to Vermont.
Vermont was a good state until it was invaded and the invaders destroyed it.
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:11 PM
 
256 posts, read 175,024 times
Reputation: 933
I appreciate everyone who replied in a spirit of helpfulness. I've saved those posts. As for the others, I appreciate them even more. I learned even more from them, although perhaps not what they intended.

I could respond to those who misinterpreted my words, but I have found that, at least online, it is an exercise in futility. Those who wish to misinterpret rarely let anything stand in their way.

I've lived in the mountains virtually my whole life. And frankly, to a westerner, there are no mountains east of the mississippi, no matter what they are called. So call me whatever you want, but flatlander isn't accurate.

pax
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Old 11-30-2009, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,543 posts, read 55,469,830 times
Reputation: 32286
"And frankly, to a westerner, there are no mountains east of the mississippi, no matter what they are called."

I see. Makes me understand more why easterners say there is no intelligence west of the Mississippi.
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Old 11-30-2009, 09:37 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
Reputation: 8170
Quote:
Originally Posted by sombrueil View Post
I appreciate everyone who replied in a spirit of helpfulness. I've saved those posts. As for the others, I appreciate them even more. I learned even more from them, although perhaps not what they intended.

I could respond to those who misinterpreted my words, but I have found that, at least online, it is an exercise in futility. Those who wish to misinterpret rarely let anything stand in their way.

I've lived in the mountains virtually my whole life. And frankly, to a westerner, there are no mountains east of the mississippi, no matter what they are called. So call me whatever you want, but flatlander isn't accurate.

pax

----"those who wish to misinterpret"

YOU are the one who posted about that fella in Canada whose sheep give birth in a very cold ,snowy,climate outside with no assistance,no shelter, and very little labor required year long

--IF-- you actually believe what you post, Saskatchewan is the place for you, not Vermont.
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Old 11-30-2009, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 27,433,157 times
Reputation: 6832
Let me ask what may be a dumb question. Why don't you winter your livestock in a warmer climate?
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Old 11-30-2009, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
Reputation: 19849
Quote:
Originally Posted by sombrueil View Post
... I've lived in the mountains virtually my whole life. And frankly, to a westerner, there are no mountains east of the mississippi, no matter what they are called. So call me whatever you want, but flatlander isn't accurate.

pax
I hear you.

I have commented many times among Mainers whenever they use the phrase: "Flatland" asking where is the closest mountain?

There are a few low-elevation slopes in Maine, but nothing high, no thin-air.

My friends in California have asked me what it is like living in such a flat state.

To me, I just dont feel like it is so flat-level with all of these trees blocking the horizon.

If you do not require re-tuning your car for the thin air, then your not on a mountain.

Or adjusting cooking times with every meal, ...
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Old 11-30-2009, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
Reputation: 19849
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Let me ask what may be a dumb question. Why don't you winter your livestock in a warmer climate?
Why?

Is the weather a problem?

Our sheep seem to love it.

Goats moan about the weather, but our sheep dont.

We have seen problems with our chickens, but I think that we have fixed that now.
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Old 11-30-2009, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,688,814 times
Reputation: 8303
Quote:
Originally Posted by sombrueil View Post
I appreciate everyone who replied in a spirit of helpfulness. I've saved those posts. As for the others, I appreciate them even more. I learned even more from them, although perhaps not what they intended.

I could respond to those who misinterpreted my words, but I have found that, at least online, it is an exercise in futility. Those who wish to misinterpret rarely let anything stand in their way.

I've lived in the mountains virtually my whole life. And frankly, to a westerner, there are no mountains east of the mississippi, no matter what they are called. So call me whatever you want, but flatlander isn't accurate.

pax

Part of the problem lies in the wording of your title post - "retirement farm in vermont -- dumb?"

It implies that you want to hear what people really think. Worded slightly differently - for instance without the "dumb" - responses might have been worded more tactfully.

I have to agree with the others regarding sheep rearing in Saskatchewan. I am in Manitoba and my brother raises sheep. Unless you are raising Big Horn Sheep, you would have high losses due to predation, and lots of ewes and their lambs would die because of cold without any shelter or assistance. You need to feed in winter here - there is no such thing as grazing sheep or anything else throughout a Manitoba or Saskatchewan winter without supplemental feeding. There is no such thing as open water in the wintertime in Manitoba or Saskatchewan.

I think that is what provoked some of the stronger responses because it defies logic.

And lambing time is crazy, with what ewes rejecting their young, or dropping three and four lambs at a time.

In short, while sheep are not the only form of farming my brother is engaged in, he works very hard, as do all farmers with livestock, and has an off-the-farm job to supplement his income as he builds his farm. So, no, it is hard to get animals to pay for themselves.

I think you are misunderstanding how your friends farm in Sask. I've found that is a common problem with visitors who don't understand just how much time farming consumes. I wasn't sure from your post what you meant by your sheep farmers working 3/4 time. I've never heard that phrase. That three quarters out of every twenty-four hours they work? That's an awful lot of work. Further, farming can't just be turned on and off like a punch clock. Some days it will consume more of your time than others.

However, you are lucky enough, knowing these Sask farmers, that you have access to first-hand information if you would still like to pursue your plan of a retirement farm. Perhaps you'd be able to stay with them for a week at different times of the year, so as to understand exactly how they operate before investing in your own farm.

After Sask, any place else has to be easier.
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Old 11-30-2009, 05:51 PM
 
1,134 posts, read 3,654,123 times
Reputation: 653
I love Vermont, so dont take this the wrong way....
But if I was to retire, I would wnat to go where things might
be little easier than where I was leaving.
The reality of Vermont is waaaaaaaaaay different than the storybook-
or Tv style depiction most people are used to.
Very high cost of living, locals who dont appreciate newcomers, cold 8 months
of the year, rainy, dark, cold 8 months of the year, rainy, dark and did I mention,
cold and rainy 8 months of the year ? If you like this, c'mon down ! If the 4-5 months
of semi-wet but pretty landscape is what you desire, this will work for you.
Personally, I have found all the stuff Vermont is 'sposed to be in PA, NC and KY.
Way more Vermont than Vermont
Upstate NY off the Taconic Pkway is nice too......
Research carefully. The Vermont you are looking for isnt really in too many places in Vermont
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