U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Halloween!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 12-01-2009, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
11,500 posts, read 26,058,809 times
Reputation: 14018
"We generally will get one storm each week. A blanket of a couple inches, followed by a week of clear skies and bright sun. The glare is terrible, thus the need for sunglasses. So you see [I hope] where my sunglasses only get used in the winter. I had assumed that Vermont was likewise well North of that junk too. My apology."

No need for apology. A lot of folks see the promotional photos of Vermont and think along those same lines. If anything, the Vermont tourism bureau should apologize for the mis-information.

One of the major reasons I had to get out of Vermont was the lack of sun. I had some serious issues with S.A.D. and needed more light. I also had problems with the way my body was reacting to cold, so south I went. It is only after 20 years without a winter in south Florida, and almost unrelenting high energy sunshine that I've been able to move as far north as I have.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-01-2009, 11:07 AM
 
41,657 posts, read 44,962,926 times
Reputation: 12798
Personlly ; When I hear of retired people moving to a rural area:I always have to wander. Unless farmers had family that lived with them ;they always moved from the farm as they aged in years gone by. But even then the differences between rural medicine and larger towns was not so great as now. I have known many that live on farms and ranches all their adult life who eventauly moved because of the health issue as they got older because of the lack od really good medical facilites in comparison.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2009, 02:59 PM
 
Location: The Woods
14,345 posts, read 13,265,687 times
Reputation: 5936
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
WOW!

If I move South to Vermont I could find an 8 month winter?

I would have thought that to find such coldness I would have to go another 1,000 miles north.

Why would folks down South have such a logner winter than we have here in Maine?

Dark? too?

Here in Maine during the winter is when it is the brightest. We can't go outside in January without wearing sunglasses, but you again say that if I were to go South I would find 'darkness' in the winter?

How does that work?

Winters here are about 4 months long, and winters end up being much brighter than summers are. But you say that down South in Vermont, that winter grows to 8 months long and that it becomes dark.

Can you please explain this?
I believe (I may be incorrect but I think not) that the coldest recorded temperature in New England was in Vermont...Maine actually does in my opinion get slightly milder winters (though seemingly more snow) than the Northeast Kingdom of VT (of course it's all relative and subject to interpretation).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2009, 03:02 PM
 
Location: The Woods
14,345 posts, read 13,265,687 times
Reputation: 5936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tupperpatr View Post
As a native Vermonter I have to say defend us by saying we are not unfriendly. We are the first one there when the new neighbor gets stuck in the driveway after a January storm. The first to offer the warmth of our woodstove when the power goes out and the neighbors do not have any heat. I hope you get my point. The only reason I am not in Vermont anymore is the other half of my marriage (another native Vermonter) hates snow!
That sort of thing is true but I can say from my experience growing up in the NEK we didn't work too hard to make the Howard Dean/liberal ex-hippy/animal rights types too comfortable (actually the opposite). It really depends on one's attitudes how newcomers were treated. The ones who were trying to wipe out our culture and way of life were not welcome, anyone else was fine...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2009, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
11,500 posts, read 26,058,809 times
Reputation: 14018
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
I believe (I may be incorrect but I think not) that the coldest recorded temperature in New England was in Vermont...Maine actually does in my opinion get slightly milder winters (though seemingly more snow) than the Northeast Kingdom of VT (of course it's all relative and subject to interpretation).
Nah. Mt. Washington in New Hampshire gets the nod for cold and some other stats.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2009, 03:48 PM
 
Location: The Woods
14,345 posts, read 13,265,687 times
Reputation: 5936
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Nah. Mt. Washington in New Hampshire gets the nod for cold and some other stats.
New England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Looks like I was right, -50 in Bloomfield, Vermont in 1933, though ME tied it this year.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2009, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
8,788 posts, read 22,214,576 times
Reputation: 4740
OP, why Vermont in particular? I have to agree with Sunsprit's suggestion on Oregon - you can find several different climate regions in Oregon, it's closer to where you are now, I don't see the specific advantage in the long-haul move to the East Coast.

New Hampshire is very similar in climate to VT, but has lower taxes in general.

I have visited VT, it's pretty in the fall, but I would not want to over-winter there on a regular basis.

Something you have not really got into is how active you want your retirement to be. Any kind of farming, even my minimalist leased grazing operation, involves pretty serious work at least from time to time. With the leased grazing, if nothing goes wrong, no fence breaks, I can stand back and just watch for a couple of days during the working week, but there is a quota of water line moving that has to be done at least weekly, and really should be done daily or oftener. But neither the cattleman nor myself are depending on this for serious income, so we don't have to "stay on it" like someone who is really in the biz.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2009, 11:55 AM
 
Location: The Woods
14,345 posts, read 13,265,687 times
Reputation: 5936
I think if the OP cut their goal down in half as far as land goes (maybe 25 acres or so), don't expect to profit, and leave most of the land as woodlot (try to manage for maples for syrup if possible along with firewood from other trees) and perhaps a fruit orchard (remember there's limits on what will grow in VT for fruit) as well as a garden, cut back on the livestock plans considerably, it will be more practical (and enjoyable). I just don't think 50 to 100 acres, a lot of livestock, no equipment, etc., will work out. Remember that keeping land cleared requires working the land or else the land returns to a young forest in less than a decade in many spots in the state. I've always been a fan of buying more land but in VT it costs a lot to do so and unless you manage it for trees it's considerable work keeping it cleared for pastures, etc.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2009, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
21,667 posts, read 27,623,810 times
Reputation: 8698
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
I think if the OP cut their goal down in half as far as land goes (maybe 25 acres or so), don't expect to profit, and leave most of the land as woodlot (try to manage for maples for syrup if possible along with firewood from other trees) and perhaps a fruit orchard (remember there's limits on what will grow in VT for fruit) as well as a garden, cut back on the livestock plans considerably, it will be more practical (and enjoyable). I just don't think 50 to 100 acres, a lot of livestock, no equipment, etc., will work out. Remember that keeping land cleared requires working the land or else the land returns to a young forest in less than a decade in many spots in the state. I've always been a fan of buying more land but in VT it costs a lot to do so and unless you manage it for trees it's considerable work keeping it cleared for pastures, etc.
LOL

That is very near to what we are doing.

'leave most of the land as woodlot' - check

'manage for maples for syrup' - check

'a fruit orchard' - check

'a garden' - check



I might add our fruit orchard includes; an apple section; plus a nut section with: walnut, pecan, chestnut, and hazel nut; and then other fruits like: cherry, pear, plum, mulberry, apricot, and elderberry; and then we have a section with basket-weaver willow, ginkgo, and witch hazel.



Quote:
... the land returns to a young forest in less than a decade
Boy howdy does it ever.

The land is forever shooting up trees everywhere. Trees and rocks, that is.

Goats and sheep work well to help knock down the brush.

Hogs work good to keep the roots tore-up too.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2009, 12:13 PM
 
7 posts, read 35,125 times
Reputation: 20
Default Vermont: Here We Come???

Well my family and I lived in Vermont for 32 years and about 6 years ago moved out to the west coast on the Olympic Peninsula to be closer to all three of our kids who had finished schooling in the east and then all relocated to Washington state. I must confess, even after 6 years I sometimes yearn to return and I haven't totally given up the idea though my husband sort of shutters at the thought. I remind him that yes, it is very cold, very snowy, pay scales are low even when times were good and traveling can be difficult, but now we are basically retired (he still repairs antique clocks but that can be done at home) and we wouldn't have to trudge off every day to regular jobs.
You sound like you have a good background to make such a move and the energy to do it and no, you are not too old to do it! Change is good -- it opens new doors and gives one a new zest for life. New adventures.
People in Vermont in general are for the most part liberal leaning, independent, good neighbors and a little bit onery (why else would you stay and persevere with the elements year after year?). Do bear in mind that taxes are high there and heating costs are high too, as to be expected in a place that has basically 6 months of some sort of heating involved. Vermont also has that charming 5th season, known as "Mud Season," that can be a challenge and chances are if you are on a small farm you'll also be on a dirt road. But a 4X4 usually can deal with that well.
There are quite a few people in Vermont living your dream, or trying to, and they seem to be quite serious about it. Vermont is small town living at it's best and worse (by this I mean everybody knows what is happening to their neighbor but by and large they don't really care, they just like to know).
Also bear in mind there are distinctly different regions of Vermont. The Northeast Kingdom is still relatively remote and generally the coldest temps are there. Southern Vermont tends more toward its neighboring states. There are also "snow belts" -- ask your realtor about these.
I'll be interested to see what you decide. Oregon is beautiful as well but you sound like you are ready for an adventure. If I were you, I'd head toward the Green Mountains.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top