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Old 11-30-2009, 10:50 PM
 
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One Maine town found a way to keep theier area away from developers by introducing Amish. Interesting read. We always had Amish farmers in the Iowa county where my family lives. Their farmers were always neat as a pin.

Maine town quickly embraces new, Amish neighbors - The Boston Globe
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Old 12-01-2009, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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It is interesting that one family moved from Smyrna to Unity.
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Old 12-01-2009, 02:31 PM
 
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Interesting article, but to be honest with you, the Amish have also learned from us here too.

Last year they borrowed this farmers tractor, and being up against the weather and trying to get their hay in for the winter before snow flies in October, is always a tough deal. Well as they ran the tractor and the haybaler, something let loose in the tractors transmission. It ran down over this hill, crashed through a rockwall, ran out into a swamp and finally hit a tree and literally broke in half by snapping the frame.

The Amish all ran home, put on their Sunday best and went back to the farmers house to tell him what happened. The elder of the farm spoke for the rest of the group and told him what happened to his tractor. "As we speak, we are getting teams of horses together to pull the tractor from the swamp, and as soon as we can get the parts, we will have your tractor put back together."

The farmer just laughed and said, "If I was you, I would be more worried about getting the rest of your hay in before winter. That tractor isn't going anywhere, go grab my other tractor and finish up your haying."

Th truth is the Amish do well here, NOT because the town embrace's them, they do well because they live in an an era that is teeming with farmers; farmers who have farmed in tough economic situations, in very rocky soil, and in an area that has short growing seasons. They are no different then us here. They are hard workers, toiling with livestock and the land, and are God-fearing people. Once we realized they are no different then us, we have left them alone.
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Old 12-01-2009, 02:36 PM
 
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Interestingly, my only complaint is not with them, but with the people here that refuse to be courteous to them. So far they have had 3 horses hit, and the other day I saw a car pass a team of horses doing well over 60 mph on a 45 mph road. I always slow down. I know their horses very rarely spook as they work them daily, but what is the hurry.

Slow moving horses in the road...
Slow moving tractor in the road...

What is the difference. Slow down people!
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Old 12-01-2009, 06:12 PM
 
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------What is the difference---

In our state, the tractor can not be on any public road unless it has a triangle, reflective, slow moving vehicle sign on the back ( or visible flashing lights)

Amish buggies pulled by horses( in our area) don't because the Amish refuse to follow that rule claiming it is against their beliefs.
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Old 12-02-2009, 05:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
------What is the difference---

In our state, the tractor can not be on any public road unless it has a triangle, reflective, slow moving vehicle sign on the back ( or visible flashing lights)

Amish buggies pulled by horses( in our area) don't because the Amish refuse to follow that rule claiming it is against their beliefs.
I've never seen that. In Iowa, they always had that Red/Orange slow traffic triangle on the back of their carriage.

This photo below is from Berlin, Ohio.

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Old 12-02-2009, 05:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
Interesting article, but to be honest with you, the Amish have also learned from us here too.

Last year they borrowed this farmers tractor, and being up against the weather and trying to get their hay in for the winter before snow flies in October, is always a tough deal. Well as they ran the tractor and the haybaler, something let loose in the tractors transmission. It ran down over this hill, crashed through a rockwall, ran out into a swamp and finally hit a tree and literally broke in half by snapping the frame.

The Amish all ran home, put on their Sunday best and went back to the farmers house to tell him what happened. The elder of the farm spoke for the rest of the group and told him what happened to his tractor. "As we speak, we are getting teams of horses together to pull the tractor from the swamp, and as soon as we can get the parts, we will have your tractor put back together."

The farmer just laughed and said, "If I was you, I would be more worried about getting the rest of your hay in before winter. That tractor isn't going anywhere, go grab my other tractor and finish up your haying."

Th truth is the Amish do well here, NOT because the town embrace's them, they do well because they live in an an era that is teeming with farmers; farmers who have farmed in tough economic situations, in very rocky soil, and in an area that has short growing seasons. They are no different then us here. They are hard workers, toiling with livestock and the land, and are God-fearing people. Once we realized they are no different then us, we have left them alone.
Back in the early 1970s, I remember some farms where they allowed some Amish kids to store their mini bikes in an outbuilding away from their parents. As clickish and nosey as a small town could be, I always wondered if the parents ever got wind of the rumors of their kids and small motor scooters. Maybe not since they stuck to themselves mostly.

I'm sure it's different now,
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Old 12-02-2009, 09:22 AM
 
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Motor Scooters would be allowed by the Amish here as they would be under the horsepower rating. In other words small gasoline engines like motor scooters, chainsaws, lawnmowers and gas driven air compressors, etc ARE allowed. In fact the Amish ladies use small hp gasoline engines to drive the motors o their washing machines. They have to go outside and start them, then a shaft is connected to the washing machine to turn the tub.

They do some things you would not think was allowed. For instance a few months ago I saw the neighbors house all lit up like the Griswold's home in Christmas Vacation. I asked why the electric lights and the guy said "the elders were up." They are indeed allowed to use electricity, just not a lot. Their barns are indeed powered by electricity though, and they have phones as well...and despite what the article says...they have cell phones too and can text better then I can.

As I said, they like their horses more then I do, but they really aren't that much different from us.
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Old 12-02-2009, 10:57 AM
 
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The Amish by me do not use any electricity from the grid.

Also, the ones by me would not allow motor scooters.

Stationary engines for power are allowed, but certainly not motor scooters.

Where I live, Amish would let their hay get wet with rain before they would drive a tractor powered hay baler.

Their observance of the Sabbath is quite strict.
When they put an ad for sale in the paper it never lists a telephone number--( name and address) and states-------" no Sunday inquiries"


A friend of mine had a new set of horse harness made by an Amish.
The harnessmaker ( shop was on the farm) told him the day they would be done and when he could pick them up and pay for them.

Since he was going to be in that area visiting relatives, he stopped in on a Sunday afternoon to pay and pick them up.

The harnessmaker was sitting outside in a chair that Sunday afternoon and when the friend of mine handed him the cash for the harness , the Amish man handed it back and said--------" no business on Sunday. Come bacjk tomorrow to pay and get your harmess"

I can assure you the Amish who live in my area are much fifferent than the ones who live near Broken Tap.
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Old 12-02-2009, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
------What is the difference---

In our state, the tractor can not be on any public road unless it has a triangle, reflective, slow moving vehicle sign on the back ( or visible flashing lights)

Amish buggies pulled by horses( in our area) don't because the Amish refuse to follow that rule claiming it is against their beliefs.
When driving around Pennsylvania looking for quilts, I saw quite a lot of Amish buggies. Including a "buggy rush hour" when we drove through Intercourse. They all had the triangle on the back - nothing in it against their beliefs at all, near as I can find out.

A quick google of "Amish buggies" using Images shows that just about all of them have the triangle on the back (only saw one, black and white photo, where it might not, but I don't know how old the photo is and the area where the triangle would be is obscured by the istockphoto mark).
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