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Old 12-21-2009, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Texas
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The important thing to remember about criminals is that they prefer the easier, softer targets. Anything which makes it easier for them to operate puts you at a disadvantage and darkness does that for them.

I don't have any yard lights or any around the barn (there's not much in there anyhow), but I do leave my porch lights and one in the car port on all night. I also draw the blinds at night so they not only can't see what room we're in, they also can't see what room we're NOT in, which is much more important.
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
The important thing to remember about criminals is that they prefer the easier, softer targets. Anything which makes it easier for them to operate puts you at a disadvantage and darkness does that for them.

I don't have any yard lights or any around the barn (there's not much in there anyhow), but I do leave my porch lights and one in the car port on all night. I also draw the blinds at night so they not only can't see what room we're in, they also can't see what room we're NOT in, which is much more important.
Good points all. Though, I hate being out in the country and the thought of having to pull shades when I cannot even see the neighbors' houses except for their barn lights.

SIGH.
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Good points all. Though, I hate being out in the country and the thought of having to pull shades when I cannot even see the neighbors' houses except for their barn lights.

SIGH.
We do not own any shades or blinds, there are none on any of our windows.

On the other hand our dogs usually alert us to moose or bear nearby in our forest.
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Old 12-21-2009, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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It's a well-believed fallacy (http://data.nextrionet.com/site/idsa/is104.pdf - broken link) that security lights create safety. Even the U.S. Department of Justice has stated that there is no support either way regarding the impact of lighting on crime; it's only definite impact is on the fear of crime, which is something else entirely.

Councils across England are reducing street lights in the wake of the discovery that, nope, turning off the street lights at night not only didn't increase crime, it reduced it. (Oops!)

Most burglaries occur during the day. So much for light preventing them.
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Old 12-21-2009, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
It's a well-believed fallacy (http://data.nextrionet.com/site/idsa/is104.pdf - broken link) that security lights create safety. Even the U.S. Department of Justice has stated that there is no support either way regarding the impact of lighting on crime; it's only definite impact is on the fear of crime, which is something else entirely.

Councils across England are reducing street lights in the wake of the discovery that, nope, turning off the street lights at night not only didn't increase crime, it reduced it. (Oops!)

Most burglaries occur during the day. So much for light preventing them.
I agree.

The fear of crime is much more than the crime.

If you live in urban high-crime area, well life sucks. No matter what you do, your life will be controlled by your fear of crime.

Rural regions by their very nature have much lower crime. If you are 10 miles away from the nearest other person, how can you commit a crime? You can't.

Most crimes require people in close contact with other people, the closer the contact the higher the crime rate.

Our local news paper [not in my town of course but the next town over] in their Police Journal routinely has stories about stray dogs, or couples fighting.

I understand that sometimes when a person has filled their life with fear, they may need bright lights to comfort them.

But really such has no effect on crime, and is certainly not helpful in a rural setting.
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Old 12-21-2009, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Canada
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There's another reason farm yards traditionally have yard lights: I'm in my 40s and when I was growing up we had a general yard light on and that light was on so that any person in need of help could know where to find it. Lights aren't all about protecting one's property or self against thieves.

Normally, unless expecting visitors I have our yard light turned off. However, in blizzard conditions, or foggy conditions, or even extremely cold conditions I turn the light on and I do that specifically for the traveller who may need help for any variety of reasons.

Vehicles do break down, even from locals, and a yard light is the equivalent of a candle in the window letting folks know where help is to be found.

I have no idea if that was just the tradition/reason for my area or whether that is something that is common to other rural areas and people of my generation, but to me, a yard light means help is near and it has many a time reassured me when driving in near white-out conditions when I catch the faintest flicker of light and know which farm I am driving past and where exactly I am on the road.

Just a thought to keep in mind before bringing out Mr. Winchester

That being said, we have GSDs. Much better than Mr. Winchester. They are inside/outside dogs but are always inside at night. The main crime problems that we and others in our area have experienced are teenagers trying to steal gas from large containment tanks. The dogs woke me up one night and I do not turn on the lights in the house as the only thing that does is make me visible to whoever is out there while screw with my night vision.

Half-asleep, I peeked out the window, saw the glimmer of tail lights near the tanks, turned on the yard light and a second later a pickup drove like a bat out of hell off our driveway. Problem solved. Went back to bed.

This has happened maybe 3 times since '92 and nothing at all in the last 11 years.

The other problem farmers have is local boys with a few too many beers dissolving their unformed brains setting hay stacks on fire as a 'joke.' But we are far enough away from the road that that has never happened to us.

Had a weird guy come to my door one night when my husband was in the hospital and I've always wondered if he knew my husband was in the hospital. He was a 'new' local, having only lived in the area a couple of years. Claimed he had lost a couple of calves and that they were in our pasture. I told him through the screen door, with a massive German shepherd next to me, that he'd have to come and take a look in the morning.

Then I called my parents, and they came immediately and discovered he had parked his pickup about a third of the way down our 500 metre driveway and walked the rest of the way. That just doesn't seem like an honest man to me, to park there and walk the rest of the way at 11 o'clock at night. (There were no lost calves on our property )

But my dog would have taken him apart if there had been any attack on me. And my dad and my brother had a very short and to-the-point talk with him. Problem solved.
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Old 12-21-2009, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Motion sensor lights are great too.

In one home we had, I hot-wired a motion sensor to lawn sprinklers. That was cool.

Nobody is staying around once your sprinklers are on.

I do not like light beams as our livestock tend to free-range. If we had a neighbor within a mile it might be an issue, but hey we are rural, so obviously there are no neighbors that close, or else we would be urban, right?

But if your urban and have no livestock free ranging, then light beams can control lights or sprinklers. [I prefer sprinklers over shotguns]

LGDs work well too. Even if all they do is jump on folks and slobber. In the dark of the night, 150 pounds of fur and slobber will undo the best of thieves.
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Old 12-21-2009, 11:03 PM
 
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Default i wonder

Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
The important thing to remember about criminals is that they prefer the easier, softer targets. Anything which makes it easier for them to operate puts you at a disadvantage and darkness does that for them.

I don't have any yard lights or any around the barn (there's not much in there anyhow), but I do leave my porch lights and one in the car port on all night. I also draw the blinds at night so they not only can't see what room we're in, they also can't see what room we're NOT in, which is much more important.
Most rural crime here in north central WI is people looking for something to finance a meth or coke habit,for these people easy/hard is irrelevant,they're not pro burglars considering the odds but folks,esp. meth heads ,who would waste their momma if necessary much less you or any dog you have.

Perhaps as a combat vet I look at things differently, but for these type of encounters I consider darkness my friend.

Also unless human life is involved, nothing I own is worth going through a trial for even if the odds of a jury convicting me are slim.
But if my locked bedroom door is breached,OO buck from the prone position.

Last edited by Wingfoot; 12-21-2009 at 11:06 PM.. Reason: add
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Old 12-22-2009, 05:30 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,923,781 times
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Originally Posted by Wingfoot View Post

Perhaps as a combat vet I look at things differently, but for these type of encounters I consider darkness my friend.
How ironic. I'm a combat Veteran too (Army Infantry) and I was just thinking the opposite. I can too well remember when the darkness held real terrors, not the imaginary kind, even though it's been nearly 40 years. There were times when I really would liked to have
had a light switch to flip! On the other hand, I can also remember when the lights came on (artillery flares) and I didn't like that either. If I can see them, they can see me!

Mark it down to paranoia, I guess, but my perimeter is a defense in depth, with a 50-100 meter kill zone coming first, lights as a deterent, dogs in the house as warning and guns within reach for my FPF (Final Protective Fires).

Others may call it fear if they wish. I prefer to call it the practical application of acquired knowledge.
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Old 12-22-2009, 08:32 AM
 
1,340 posts, read 2,516,704 times
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Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
How ironic. I'm a combat Veteran too (Army Infantry) and I was just thinking the opposite. I can too well remember when the darkness held real terrors, not the imaginary kind, even though it's been nearly 40 years. There were times when I really would liked to have
had a light switch to flip! On the other hand, I can also remember when the lights came on (artillery flares) and I didn't like that either. If I can see them, they can see me!

Mark it down to paranoia, I guess, but my perimeter is a defense in depth, with a 50-100 meter kill zone coming first, lights as a deterent, dogs in the house as warning and guns within reach for my FPF (Final Protective Fires).

Others may call it fear if they wish. I prefer to call it the practical application of acquired knowledge.
As a hunter and woodsman all my long life the dark never held any terrors for me, but in the RVN I saw that it did for most people.

Of course wise to have a dog and a .357 on the night-stand and a pump in the corner.Just don't let paranoria make you hasty, most places in the USA you're going to trial if you shoot someone and having elaborate defenses that a prosecuter can bring up is unhelpful.
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