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Old 01-05-2010, 08:35 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naptowner View Post
Sure, if someone is talking about moving to the country, it's kind of stupid for cityboy to barge in talking about how boring it will be out in the country.
But that's a little different from pretending you can't understand what anyone would find entertaining about cities, isn't it?
Yes. But your post kind of brings out what I was 'playing dumb' about (sometimes I'm too cynical for my own good). When the cityboy points that boredom out, he/she is not taking into account at all that the person posting is probably specifically looking for that 'boredom,' which, of course, isn't boring to him/her at all.

My original post should have been more along the lines of 'what is so universally exciting about the city.' That would have been a better way of wording it. Or 'I don't get what am I supposed to find so wonderful about the city that is shared by all who experience the city?' Actually what I don't understand is why some folks can't understand that their idea of why the city is so wonderful is just the thing that turns some folks off to the city. Just different perspectives, is all. To each his own...
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Old 01-05-2010, 08:40 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
11,044 posts, read 10,788,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Last February the greatest entertainment here was when we got two days of rain in February that turned the roads into such sheets of ice that nothing moved - so we all put on our skates and skated down the highway It was a very nice two days and the best and most miraculous thing was that no one got killed on the roads. Mostly because anyone that tried leaving their driveways never made it out of them due to the ice. And it was a pretty perfect ice surface.

Some folks had to spread straw for the cattle because they couldn't stand up. We kept our livestock inside once I saw how it was raining.
That would be a fun skate... as long as one could stay clear of the 'hockey puck' cars.
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:36 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,582,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naptowner View Post
Some people like art, theater, and music. Some like ethnic food that isn't generally available in rural areas. That shouldn't be too hard to understand.
And just how often do most people in the big cities go to Art Museums or Galleries? Theater performances? Music concerts? or out of the ordinary ethnic restaurants?

I live in a very small town, in the middle of a very rural county an hour+ away from any city that is over 10,000 people. I go to great Art Museums 6 or 7 times a year (Art Institute of Chicago, Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit); world class sculpture parks 5 or 6 times a year (Frederik Meijer Gardens, Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art Sculpture Garden); Music concerts whenever I feel like it because there is always one within an hour of me every single week-end. Greek restaurants once or twice a month, Indian food once a month, Korean, Thai, Ethiopian, Middle Eastern, etc... they are all a short drive if I ever get the urge for them. Theater? Yep we have one of those close by as well. It would be the one where the likes of James Earl Jones got his start. Where some of the local talent; you very well may listen to, if you listen to audio books. Several of the local actors, also read for audio-book publishers and take home awards every year in the industry. You in big cities go buy the CD's, we listen to them live and in person (or sit on their back decks in the middle of the sticks and have a beer and Bar-B-Que). We take the kids to childrens museums at least once a month, Zoo's 6-8 times a year. I am willing to bet my family attends more "events" than 90% of those who also have to deal with traffic, noise, pollution, high costs, crowded subways/trains, etc... on a day to day basis. Yet I get to sit on my porch and talk with the neighbors as they stroll by in the evenings, or sit out on the beach with the kids swimming under the sunset and not have another soul in sight. Ever sat on a sugar sand beach, on the 4th of July week-end and not had a person for a couple of miles in either direction? I do every year (in a popular vacation destination FOR the beach, as locals, we know where to go without the vacationers). Plus a short drive can take me to all the "entertainment" a person can stand. What I spend on gas to get there is still WAY less than what you have to spend on rent to live with the dis-advantages every day.

See, most of us in the sticks are not stupid, OR uncultured; just smart enough to have the best of both worlds, and have them when WE want. Without having to deal with the BS that comes from living in a large city day after day.
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:50 PM
 
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As someone who is bored with living in the country, let me offer another perspective. Now, I won't lie. Im pretty much a city girl. I lived in the "country" as a kid for a few years but I spent most of my childhood in KC.

My husband was transferred to a very small town in Arkansas. The people are friendly. Very nice. But I miss my city amenities. I don't want to have to drive two hours to the mall. I want to be able to go to art exhibits, see live music, visit funky stores looking for great decorating pieces (I dig interior design). I love urban photography and would love to wander aimlessly through the city all day long taking pictures of gritty urban sights. I want to be able to go to a coffee shop that can make a latte that I don't immediately throw in the trash because it tastes terrible (no coffee here! 1.5 hours I have to drive for a decent cup!) I would love nothing more than to spend my free time cheering on a local professional sports team or college team without having to drive 3.5 hours to see a game. I hate that when I go to Walmart and they are out of something (which is every time I go there) , there are no other stores in town where I can go to pick it up. If something goes wrong with my car, the closest dealer is 3 hours away. It's just a really different lifestyle

I don't mind small town living. But isolated small town living is not for me. I thinks sometimes people think it sounds nice, until they get here and realize all the little things they gave up. We have some friends who moved to our same town from a much larger city. When they got here, they realized all they gave up. Taking the kids to get donuts on the weekend, gymnastics for their little girl, etc.

Now there is nothing wrong with rural living. I understand the reasons it appeals to people. But all people are different. I crave being around people. I like the hustle and bustle of the city. I like being able to eat Thai food at 3am if I so desire. I like being able to spend an entire evening out shopping, dinner, movie, drinks, and then head home-without ever having to get in my vehicle. I will be the first to tell someone all they are giving up when they move here...because I would rather them know it in advance then find out when they get here and be homesick. Some people just don't realize every little thing you give up, and others don't care about any of the things I mentioned above. if that's the case, then they will do well living somewhere rural and I encourage them to come on out.

me? I'll take your place in the city anyday!
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:45 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
11,044 posts, read 10,788,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melissajo View Post
As someone who is bored with living in the country, let me offer another perspective. Now, I won't lie. Im pretty much a city girl. I lived in the "country" as a kid for a few years but I spent most of my childhood in KC.

My husband was transferred to a very small town in Arkansas. The people are friendly. Very nice. But I miss my city amenities. I don't want to have to drive two hours to the mall. I want to be able to go to art exhibits, see live music, visit funky stores looking for great decorating pieces (I dig interior design). I love urban photography and would love to wander aimlessly through the city all day long taking pictures of gritty urban sights. I want to be able to go to a coffee shop that can make a latte that I don't immediately throw in the trash because it tastes terrible (no coffee here! 1.5 hours I have to drive for a decent cup!) I would love nothing more than to spend my free time cheering on a local professional sports team or college team without having to drive 3.5 hours to see a game. I hate that when I go to Walmart and they are out of something (which is every time I go there) , there are no other stores in town where I can go to pick it up. If something goes wrong with my car, the closest dealer is 3 hours away. It's just a really different lifestyle

I don't mind small town living. But isolated small town living is not for me. I thinks sometimes people think it sounds nice, until they get here and realize all the little things they gave up. We have some friends who moved to our same town from a much larger city. When they got here, they realized all they gave up. Taking the kids to get donuts on the weekend, gymnastics for their little girl, etc.

Now there is nothing wrong with rural living. I understand the reasons it appeals to people. But all people are different. I crave being around people. I like the hustle and bustle of the city. I like being able to eat Thai food at 3am if I so desire. I like being able to spend an entire evening out shopping, dinner, movie, drinks, and then head home-without ever having to get in my vehicle. I will be the first to tell someone all they are giving up when they move here...because I would rather them know it in advance then find out when they get here and be homesick. Some people just don't realize every little thing you give up, and others don't care about any of the things I mentioned above. if that's the case, then they will do well living somewhere rural and I encourage them to come on out.

me? I'll take your place in the city anyday!
This is all understandable, and I've known plenty of people who feel the same. As you say, it's just that we are all different--enjoy different things, do different things, have different temperaments.

In my case, take everything you said and make it the opposite. Perfect! Don't want the hustle and bustle. I need elbow room. The only thing I want to hear at 3am (if I happen to wake up) is the crickets outside the window, or the snowflakes hitting the roof in the winter (now THAT'S quiet). Hate shopping--well, okay, I do like to go to the grocery store now and again. Sports? NO! Coffee? Nah; I do like hot chocolate, though. Gritty urban sights? No, no, no. Yikes. All right, all right. I will admit that I like Thai food. Fine, I'll grant you that. Indian food too.


Now if we could both just move to our respective 'ideal' locations, we would both be much happier!
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Old 01-06-2010, 10:44 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 3,619,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
And just how often do most people in the big cities go to Art Museums or Galleries? Theater performances? Music concerts? or out of the ordinary ethnic restaurants?

I live in a very small town, in the middle of a very rural county an hour+ away from any city that is over 10,000 people. I go to great Art Museums 6 or 7 times a year (Art Institute of Chicago, Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit); world class sculpture parks 5 or 6 times a year (Frederik Meijer Gardens, Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art Sculpture Garden); Music concerts whenever I feel like it because there is always one within an hour of me every single week-end. Greek restaurants once or twice a month, Indian food once a month, Korean, Thai, Ethiopian, Middle Eastern, etc... they are all a short drive if I ever get the urge for them. Theater? Yep we have one of those close by as well. It would be the one where the likes of James Earl Jones got his start. Where some of the local talent; you very well may listen to, if you listen to audio books. Several of the local actors, also read for audio-book publishers and take home awards every year in the industry. You in big cities go buy the CD's, we listen to them live and in person (or sit on their back decks in the middle of the sticks and have a beer and Bar-B-Que). We take the kids to childrens museums at least once a month, Zoo's 6-8 times a year. I am willing to bet my family attends more "events" than 90% of those who also have to deal with traffic, noise, pollution, high costs, crowded subways/trains, etc... on a day to day basis. Yet I get to sit on my porch and talk with the neighbors as they stroll by in the evenings, or sit out on the beach with the kids swimming under the sunset and not have another soul in sight. Ever sat on a sugar sand beach, on the 4th of July week-end and not had a person for a couple of miles in either direction? I do every year (in a popular vacation destination FOR the beach, as locals, we know where to go without the vacationers). Plus a short drive can take me to all the "entertainment" a person can stand. What I spend on gas to get there is still WAY less than what you have to spend on rent to live with the dis-advantages every day.

See, most of us in the sticks are not stupid, OR uncultured; just smart enough to have the best of both worlds, and have them when WE want. Without having to deal with the BS that comes from living in a large city day after day.
But you live close enough to a city to do all that, and from the sound of things, you're doing an awful lot of driving:

Art museums: 6 times a year
Sculpture parks: 6 times a year
Children's museums: 12 times a year
Indian food: 12 times a year
Greek food: 18 times a year (on average)
zoos: 7 times a year

That's 61 trips a year, without counting Korean, Thai, Ethiopian, Middle Eastern, etc. food or the concerts you attend. Maybe you double up on these trips, but you still seem to be doing an awful lot of driving.

I think you're proving the point that people go to cities for entertainment. I never said people in the country were dumb or uncultured, but the point you're trying to make - that you can live in the country and have the "best of both worlds" - only works if you live close to a city. (But I'm curious - Manistee is a 4.5 hour drive from Chicago and 2 hours from Grand Rapids - so how can it be local for you? And if you live more than an hour from a city of 10,000, where are driving a "short drive" to go to all of these things?)

All I was doing in this thread was to point out that there is entertainment in cities. Maybe it doesn't equal the highly cultured entertainment of watching trucks slide on the ice, but it's there.
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Old 01-06-2010, 11:13 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
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I double and triple up on a lot of the trips. Manistee IS close to me, very close. The closest city over 10,000 is Muskegon, which has a population of 40,000+, Grand Rapids is about 1 1/2 hours away with close to 1 million in its metro area. An hour or 1 1/2 hours IS a short drive. Downtown Chicago is actually about 3 1/2 hours driving time from this area. I've lived in large cities, and frankly an hours drive is an hours drive whether you go 70 miles or just manage to crawl 10 miles. I've spent more than my fair share of time beating through gridlock and traffic jams. I KNOW it can take longer for those in large cities to travel 10 miles, than it does for me to drive 60 miles. Not all the time of course, but enough of the time to make me never want to live in that again. Also, most of the restaurants I do not have to drive to a larger city to enjoy. I can get Greek, Thai, Korean and several others within 10 minutes of my house. Not dedicated restaurants, but ones that the families are those nationalities and have traditional dishes as part of their menu. I don't have to travel far for some of those. A small childrens museum is within 10 or 15 minutes and the kids like it just as well as a much larger ones in the big cities we have been to.

Not trying to show that rural people HAVE to go to the cities for entertainment at all, there is a LOT to do right here with in 15 or 20 miles, just sometimes we get down to the larger cities and take advantage of being there with the kids. Even if I had to drive down to Chicago for everything; it is a tank of gas for a round trip ($50 to fill the vehicle), and make each trip of visit a singular outing, it would STILL be far cheaper to live where I do, than in a large city.

What I was trying to point out is that people who live in large cities don't have the lock on enjoying those things. Most people who live in cities try to make it sound like if somebody lives in the country or small town they are totally cut off from all forms of entertainment. Simply not true. You can enjoy those types of things and still live in a rural setting.

Last edited by Bydand; 01-06-2010 at 11:23 AM..
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Old 01-06-2010, 11:39 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 3,619,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
I double and triple up on a lot of the trips. Manistee IS close to me, very close. The closest city over 10,000 is Muskegon, which has a population of 40,000+, Grand Rapids is about 1 1/2 hours away with close to 1 million in its metro area. An hour or 1 1/2 hours IS a short drive. Downtown Chicago is actually about 3 1/2 hours driving time from this area. I've lived in large cities, and frankly an hours drive is an hours drive whether you go 70 miles or just manage to crawl 10 miles. I've spent more than my fair share of time beating through gridlock and traffic jams. I KNOW it can take longer for those in large cities to travel 10 miles, than it does for me to drive 60 miles. Not all the time of course, but enough of the time to make me never want to live in that again. Also, most of the restaurants I do not have to drive to a larger city to enjoy. I can get Greek, Thai, Korean and several others within 10 minutes of my house. Not dedicated restaurants, but ones that the families are those nationalities and have traditional dishes as part of their menu. I don't have to travel far for some of those. A small childrens museum is within 10 or 15 minutes and the kids like it just as well as a much larger ones in the big cities we have been to.

Not trying to show that rural people HAVE to go to the cities for entertainment at all, there is a LOT to do right here with in 15 or 20 miles, just sometimes we get down to the larger cities and take advantage of being there with the kids. Even if I had to drive down to Chicago for everything; it is a tank of gas for a round trip ($50 to fill the vehicle), and make each trip of visit a singular outing, it would STILL be far cheaper to live where I do, than in a large city.

What I was trying to point out is that people who live in large cities don't have the lock on enjoying those things. Most people who live in cities try to make it sound like if somebody lives in the country or small town they are totally cut off from all forms of entertainment. Simply not true. You can enjoy those types of things and still live in a rural setting.
I wasn't trying to claim you HAVE to live in a city to enjoy those things. I was responding to the OP's question about what people found entertaining in cities. I think you'd have to admit that one is much more likely to find these things in or around a city than in a rural area. Most people who live an hour away from a town of 10,000 don't have even a small children's museum within 10 minutes, or a wide variety of ethnic food, either.
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Old 01-06-2010, 12:32 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
11,044 posts, read 10,788,575 times
Reputation: 9701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Not trying to show that rural people HAVE to go to the cities for entertainment at all, there is a LOT to do right here with in 15 or 20 miles,
And see, this was part of my original post, which admittedly was a bit of a dig and rant. I know everyone is different and enjoys different aspects of life. It's just that some folks (generally city folks) tend to assume that their brand of 'entertainment' is the only thing going. And they assume (usually in horror) that somebody wanting to move to the 'middle of nowhere' is either depressed, suicidal, a whacko hermit, uneducated, or doesn't know they are sentencing themselves to an isolated monastic life. So, they post their little digs with all sorts of snide or unbelieving comments.

Personally, and I know I'm not completely alone (I was tongue-in-cheek about being the only one), there is very little in the city that even interests me, let alone entertains me. There is no such thing as a 'universal entertainment' and it certainly wouldn't have to be in a city if it did exist. If one wants hear the songbirds rather than horns and revving motors, the city is not the place to be. If one would rather look out the window and see the countryside or the sunrise or an occasional deer (or other critter) rather than asphalt, cars, faceless buildings, wall-to-wall people, and homes stuck together like crackerboxes, the city is not the place to be. If one wants to smell the fresh breeze (with perhaps a bit of cow dung mixed in ) rather than the exhaust from the steady stream of cars driving past, the city is not the place to be. And, yes Virginia, there are those types of folks floating around... and they are of sound mind.
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Old 01-06-2010, 12:50 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,784 posts, read 7,041,001 times
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Here is another one of those "opinion" threads and we all need to remember that an opinion is just that, it is not an absolute fact. ChrisC and others, your opinion is that there is plenty that is entertaining to you away from the city, and melissajo and others, you find nothing entertaining in the country and need the hustle and bustle of city life to feel satisfied and complete. There is absolutely nothing wrong with either opinion. I think the point of these posts is to point out that in many cases, things can get out of hand a little on these forums with people on one side chastising others for their opposing views. Everyone is different and for someone to tell another that they are basically "crazy" for thinking a particular way is in my mind a display of childish behavior.
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