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Old 01-10-2010, 10:07 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,110 posts, read 7,830,250 times
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"When I say I hate the city, I'm certainly not saying that I hate the people in the city--I'm just saying I hate the lifestyle and the atmosphere"

Talk about sweeping generalizations. What the hell does this mean?- Certainly all people in the city obviously live a similar if not identical lifestyle and the atmosphere of a city is similarly unvarying.

Just like all folks in the country are uneducated hicks and hermits and the atmosphere is unyieldingly oppressive. No different lifestyles or atmosphere out in the country neither right?

Oh yeah, thats obviously what I was saying.

Last edited by T. Damon; 01-10-2010 at 10:23 PM..
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Old 01-10-2010, 10:54 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
11,044 posts, read 10,792,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
"When I say I hate the city, I'm certainly not saying that I hate the people in the city--I'm just saying I hate the lifestyle and the atmosphere"

Talk about sweeping generalizations. What the hell does this mean?- Certainly all people in the city obviously live a similar if not identical lifestyle and the atmosphere of a city is similarly unvarying.

Just like all folks in the country are uneducated hicks and hermits and the atmosphere is unyieldingly oppressive. No different lifestyles or atmosphere out in the country neither right?

Oh yeah, thats obviously what I was saying.
Are you purposely misinterpreting everything I write? Of course there is an 'atmosphere' in sparsely populated areas. That's the reason I'd rather be there. If that weren't the case, I wouldn't bother with planning a move. I don't like the city. Is that okay with you? City life does not suit me. Is that okay? If it offends you, I'm truly sorry. It's not an us vs them thing--it's simply preference. What doesn't work for me, works fine for plenty of other folks. It's okay.

And it's surely okay with me if you like whatever you wish to like. (now let's see if you can get some sort of hostile statement out of that sentence)
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Old 01-10-2010, 11:31 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,110 posts, read 7,830,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
Are you purposely misinterpreting everything I write? Of course there is an 'atmosphere' in sparsely populated areas. That's the reason I'd rather be there. If that weren't the case, I wouldn't bother with planning a move. I don't like the city. Is that okay with you? City life does not suit me. Is that okay? If it offends you, I'm truly sorry. It's not an us vs them thing--it's simply preference. What doesn't work for me, works fine for plenty of other folks. It's okay.

And it's surely okay with me if you like whatever you wish to like. (now let's see if you can get some sort of hostile statement out of that sentence)
What?!

It is unfortunate you have no sense of irony.
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Old 01-15-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Location: On the west side of the Tetons
1,355 posts, read 2,118,172 times
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I've never lived in a town with a population greater than 1500. I love my rural life. There is so much to do here, from attending wonderful local art and music events, to some of the most incredible outdoor recreation in the country. There are fabulous restaurants that take advantage of the abundance of locally produced foods, there's a multiple award-winning brewery. I can sit outside at night and see the stars. And I know that I'll encounter wildlife every single day. I'm never bored (and, I can't say as though I've ever found entertainment in watching cars slide off the road).

That being said, I also love to attend the symphony, or go to an art museum any chance I get. I generally telecommute, but when I'm in the city for business, I do take in everything I can. I enjoy walking around a city like Denver or Seattle, especially at night. I often walk up to strangers and ask for directions or suggestions for dining, etc. and I've always found people to be friendly and helpful. After a couple of days, I can't stand the traffic and the noise and that city smell, so I relish the fact that I can return home.

I would never live in the city. It's not for me. And, I have city friends who love to come visit me here, but they would never choose to live "out in the middle of nowhere". It doesn't make either of us right or wrong, just differing in opinion.

It seems to be a point of pride for some people to live up to the stereotype of the cold, arrogant city-dweller, or the closed-minded, uncultured country bumpkin. In my experience, most people don't fit into either of these molds.
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,779 posts, read 6,689,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdna View Post
I've never lived in a town with a population greater than 1500. I love my rural life. There is so much to do here, from attending wonderful local art and music events,
Well, I must say that cultural - high culture - is certainly absent from my area and I don't enjoy the local art and music scene one bit. They say what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, but I don't think that applies to say, crocheted toilet roll covers, romantic acrylic paintings of little churches in the wildwood, Harlequin romances for reading material, and musical families putting their own spin on countrified religious music.

It may be rural tradition and obviously rural folks must for the most part enjoy it (there's got to be an audience besides relatives cheering these people on, doesn't there?), but I would rather be left for road kill than go to a local "art" type of thing.

It isn't that cities don't have their share of people who wouldn't know art if it bit them in the nose, but there are more options. However - I would never, ever say anything about my true feelings to anyone of my neighbours.
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:39 PM
 
Location: On the west side of the Tetons
1,355 posts, read 2,118,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
crocheted toilet roll covers, romantic acrylic paintings of little churches in the wildwood, Harlequin romances for reading material, and musical families putting their own spin on countrified religious music.
Yeah, that's not good. I can't say that I'd enjoy that, or find it very satisfying.
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:04 PM
 
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As someone who grew up in a big city in the South and went to college/grad school in another big city in the Midwest, I have to say the rural life where I live (lower Midwest) is mind-numbingly dull. Yes, to wake up to peace and quiet, with little concern for crime or any other urban hostility is a plus.

On the downside, if I want sushi or tapas or whatever ethnic dining, I have to drive over an hour to get it. I love the ballet and other artistic entertainments, and it's certainly not in my town of 10,000 people. Not even a bookstore to comb through. Truly, it is like - I imagine - taking someone who grew up in Nowhere, Mississippi and moving them to the middle of Manhattan. But in reverse.

I am here for work, and only for work, and I would like to think of myself as someone who could live anywhere and be content. It's just not happened. Adjustment is tough from urban to rural, and no doubt vice versa.

Urban folks know what's out there, and many, many of the people in my (farming) community have not been more than 30 miles from home - ever!

So I think to know what you are "missing" from urban life is one element for me. If you don't know what you are missing, then you have no comparison.

The life here centers around work and family. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but I have found absolutely no outlet for engaging discussion of any kind. And these are intelligent people in my community, but they are very reticent.

Another thing about rural life that I have discovered - and perhaps this is regional - but if you are not from the rural area in which you live (but are a transplant), you are treated with a certain level of 1) curiousity and 2) disdain/mistrust. I assume because we are strangers. Nice, honest people...but strangers nonetheless. And it's been that way for four years now.

My husband and I have endeavored to make friends, and volunteered for local United Way projects, etc. but as soon as the work is over there's no "Hey, would you like to come over for a glass of wine?" And we've tried it as well. We stopped after 5 out of 25 invitations on average were accepted for summer gatherings at our home. (We've tried to open up to the community on four occasions over the past two years).

So, in summation, we do a lot of reading and watching DVD's.

In my view, just to know that I have options is a relief. When one has no options (I'm talking entertainment, restaurants, etc.) it's a lonely, boring endeavor to live rurally unless you were born to it. But it is what it is at this point in my life due to work.
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:55 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
11,044 posts, read 10,792,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
romantic acrylic paintings of little churches in the wildwood, ... and musical families putting their own spin on countrified religious music.
Acrylics are a good medium, although I prefer watercolor or casein. I agree with you about the church paintings, though--I've always preferred either barns, rural or 'ghost town' structures in landscapes. I love R. Bradford Johnson's style--he uses watercolor technique with acrylics and his work invokes a great feel of 'serenity.' He paints primarily rural themes and captures the 'rural feel' perfectly in his art. On the other hand, I've never cared for 'abstract art' at all (or at least very seldom), which tends to be an urban phenomenon. I do like many urban landscape/structure works though--Ranulph Bye's watercolors are fantastic. Peter Poskas oils, acrylics, and watercolors are spectacular. They do a fair amount of rural landscapes too, though. I think I like those types of (primarily) rural theme artists because it gives me a hint of the same feeling that I get when I'm actually in a rural setting or hiking alone in the mountains.

As for music, although I'm into UK acid jazz, and dark neo-classical, vintage swing-jazz, and a bunch of other stuff, I'd ten-to-one rather hear a 'hillbilly' family band plugging away on a banjo, old guitar, and washtub bass than I would almost anything that is popular today on the radio.

Point of all of this is that you cannot judge what is 'good art' or 'bad art' or 'good music' or 'bad music.' There is no such thing on the whole. You can have your preference and standards, but there are 6.5 billion versions of what is good and what is bad in the arts. It's perception. It's personal preference. It has nothing to do with how 'schooled' you are in the field, either. I'm pretty well-trained in music; played professionally for eight years and have played semi-professionally for about 25. I've also been a fairly successful part-time artist in my area (I made some decent money at the time). But that does not make my opinion of what is good music or good art any more valid than your or anyone else's idea of good music or art. It can't--because it's personal perception. It's what touches you personally. I may like flapper jazz/pop from the 1920's. You may just like to sit and listen to raw white noise or square wave generation from a synth all night. Whatever works for you and for me is good art or music for each of us.

So if a family of 'hillbillies' want to get together and make some music, I say fabulous. Their instruments may be so out of tune and the singer so off-pitch that it hurts my ears. They may not know a half-diminished chord from a 6/9 chord. But who cares? That's their music. That's what makes them feel good. And it's no less inspirational and important to them than it is to you when you go see the latest 'important artist's' abstract oil painting hanging in the gallery or latest concert by whoever your favorite musician is.

It's the same thing with the rural vs city thing that I originally posted about. The main reason I wrote the post is because I was annoyed by all of the snide comments about rural people or life. We all can certainly have a preference. We can certainly share that preference with others. That's not a problem at all. The problem is when someone says something like 'there is nothing to do out in the sticks.' That is only valid for THEM. And to make the statement as a declaration that is a universal truth just doesn't work. For some, there is nothing to do in the city and for some, there is nothing to do in the country.

In my view, you've got to assume that whoever is asking about some 'middle of nowhere' place already knows what he/she likes. And if he/she doesn't, he/she needs to find out for himself/herself. So posting comments like that is not at all constructive or helpful to the original poster. It's like me asking where the best Indian restaurant is in my city and somebody posting 'Oh, Indian food is horrible' or 'Man, I hate Indian food. It sucks.' It's just not at all helpful.

Last edited by ChrisC; 01-15-2010 at 05:04 PM..
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Old 01-16-2010, 01:46 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,779 posts, read 6,689,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
Acrylics are a good medium, although I prefer watercolor or casein. I agree with you about the church paintings, though--I've always preferred either barns, rural or 'ghost town' structures in landscapes. I love R. Bradford Johnson's style--he uses watercolor technique with acrylics and his work invokes a great feel of 'serenity.' He paints primarily rural themes and captures the 'rural feel' perfectly in his art. On the other hand, I've never cared for 'abstract art' at all (or at least very seldom), which tends to be an urban phenomenon. I do like many urban landscape/structure works though--Ranulph Bye's watercolors are fantastic. Peter Poskas oils, acrylics, and watercolors are spectacular. They do a fair amount of rural landscapes too, though. I think I like those types of (primarily) rural theme artists because it gives me a hint of the same feeling that I get when I'm actually in a rural setting or hiking alone in the mountains.

As for music, although I'm into UK acid jazz, and dark neo-classical, vintage swing-jazz, and a bunch of other stuff, I'd ten-to-one rather hear a 'hillbilly' family band plugging away on a banjo, old guitar, and washtub bass than I would almost anything that is popular today on the radio.

Point of all of this is that you cannot judge what is 'good art' or 'bad art' or 'good music' or 'bad music.' There is no such thing on the whole. You can have your preference and standards, but there are 6.5 billion versions of what is good and what is bad in the arts. It's perception. It's personal preference. It has nothing to do with how 'schooled' you are in the field, either. I'm pretty well-trained in music; played professionally for eight years and have played semi-professionally for about 25. I've also been a fairly successful part-time artist in my area (I made some decent money at the time). But that does not make my opinion of what is good music or good art any more valid than your or anyone else's idea of good music or art. It can't--because it's personal perception. It's what touches you personally. I may like flapper jazz/pop from the 1920's. You may just like to sit and listen to raw white noise or square wave generation from a synth all night. Whatever works for you and for me is good art or music for each of us.

So if a family of 'hillbillies' want to get together and make some music, I say fabulous. Their instruments may be so out of tune and the singer so off-pitch that it hurts my ears. They may not know a half-diminished chord from a 6/9 chord. But who cares? That's their music. That's what makes them feel good. And it's no less inspirational and important to them than it is to you when you go see the latest 'important artist's' abstract oil painting hanging in the gallery or latest concert by whoever your favorite musician is.

It's the same thing with the rural vs city thing that I originally posted about. The main reason I wrote the post is because I was annoyed by all of the snide comments about rural people or life. We all can certainly have a preference. We can certainly share that preference with others. That's not a problem at all. The problem is when someone says something like 'there is nothing to do out in the sticks.' That is only valid for THEM. And to make the statement as a declaration that is a universal truth just doesn't work. For some, there is nothing to do in the city and for some, there is nothing to do in the country.

In my view, you've got to assume that whoever is asking about some 'middle of nowhere' place already knows what he/she likes. And if he/she doesn't, he/she needs to find out for himself/herself. So posting comments like that is not at all constructive or helpful to the original poster. It's like me asking where the best Indian restaurant is in my city and somebody posting 'Oh, Indian food is horrible' or 'Man, I hate Indian food. It sucks.' It's just not at all helpful.
Maybe I worded my post wrong, or maybe I'm just feeling contradictory today. Wrt paintings, it isn't rural scenes that specifically bug me - there is simply a recognizable difference in a painting done by a true artist and a painting done by - me. As an example. I paint. I wouldn't dream of calling it art though or showing it to anyone but it gives me pleasure and lets me let go of my brain for a while.

I also plunk away on the guitar and have a lot of respect for bluegrass music and I just may be the only one of my age any where who knows all the Carter Family songs by heart. And the Carter Family certainly falls into a folk art category.

But then there is music that doesn't, and that's okay too, to just play for pleasure the way I do, but I sure wouldn't want to go to a concert starring me and have no delusions of grandeur in that direction.

But I would say there is still a standard, however difficult it may be to put into words as to what is art, and what is not art. I think that most people would not be so presumptuous as to think they could be a rocket scientist "if" they "wanted" and yet there is an attitude towards art that is illustrated by a story told of the Canadian writer, Margaret Lawrence, who was approached at a cocktail party by a neurosurgeon who told her that when he retired, he was going to become a writer. To which she responded, "When I retire I am going to be a neurosurgeon."

There's a difference between hobbies and art. It isn't just a matter of taste. My husband is a fan of opera - while I do in fact recognize it as art, I don't like it at all. Believe me, I've tried.

However, I was born in a rural area, grew up in a rural area, have lived in cities, and in Europe where culture, even in rural areas, seems much more a part of everyday life than it does here, but nonetheless, it is my choice to live here, crocheted toilet paper covers notwithstanding. If I had no place else to go, I might feel very trapped.
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Old 01-16-2010, 10:42 AM
 
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ahhhhhhhhh---"Carter Family"

Brings back memories of my older sister playing Carter Family albums on her record player in the living room of our old farmhouse.( late 1950's )
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