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Old 01-15-2010, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,143 posts, read 43,058,077 times
Reputation: 51693

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I've always been annoyed by people who moved out to the country and resisted embracing the things that are part and parcel of the lifestyle. Why move to the country to complain that it's not the city (or suburbs). I certainly don't spend all my time, as a country girl who relocated to an urban area, grousing that my city isn't the country.
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Old 01-16-2010, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,688,044 times
Reputation: 8303
We seem to have a different problem here. There is an "in" group of townies (200 people - maybe) who seem to mimic everything the city people who move here do. It doesn't seem to be a farmer problem, purely a townie problem to look at the city newcomers as if they are more sophisticated and just more everything and the city people get voted into the Chamber of Commerce and recreational group straight away, without ever learning what is important to the community.

I have a theory, which is only a theory, and that is that it allows the in group of townies to keep their own power, since the city people are so grateful to be accepted, they vote the in-group's way on issues.

I could be totally wrong. I bake cakes when asked to for bake sales, etc, and cook what I'm asked to for the fall suppers, but the politics of the town are too intertwined with gossip for me to be interested.

We don't have any would-be homesteaders here, something that seems to aggravate rural dwellers elsewhere. I guess the main problems would be people letting their dogs run loose, and city folks complaining about the smell of manure and trying to have 100+ year old farmsteads shut down because the town grew around them. That is aggravating.

Then of course there are people like the poor city folks who moved here a few years ago, and picked up raw milk from my parents at a very low price - until my mother happened to be up extra early one morning and looked out the window and spotted them by the barn stealing milk at an hour they thought no one would be up. I think there's quite a bit of things happening like that. My father clearing snow for free, as a courtesy, only to have city folks from then on demanding it of him as though it is their right.
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Old 01-16-2010, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Pkwy (da Bronx)
966 posts, read 2,130,840 times
Reputation: 553
I really appreciate everyone sharing all this with me. Even though I can't personally relate to it all, it sure does give me a lot to chew on. Although I really don't believe that all city people behave this way, I do think that the ones who do have been so caught up in the inherent selfishness and greed of city life that when they move to rural areas they seem to still think that the whole world revolves around them and their wants and needs. It's sad. Given this unpleasant state of affairs, it is easy to see why or how all city people get lumped into this ugly picture. I, myself, am a very community-oriented person, a giving person, but after reading these posts, while I wish people would not make assumptions I will be more understanding when they do.
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Old 01-16-2010, 09:09 AM
 
25,691 posts, read 24,525,662 times
Reputation: 44286
Many smaller towns have been turned into larger cities, and the folks that move there bring their high-speed lifestyle with them. The 'good ol' boy' and simply country living has been replaced by condo living, convenience stores on every corner and malls. Sad.
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Old 01-16-2010, 09:38 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
14,530 posts, read 11,951,284 times
Reputation: 13551
Biggest gripe yea, well, the city types that moved in around here are mostly from either SoCal or the Bay Area, and many of them moved here under the impression that life here would be...a "back to nature" experience. They get all burr under the cinch with ranching, hunting, mining etc. Annoying is an understatement for some of the things these folks pull. Somebody already mentioned the 'you people need laws for this' ...uh huh. And we don't care how you did it in CA.
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Old 01-16-2010, 10:36 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,682,398 times
Reputation: 8170
A person I know is experiencing a different problem.

Their area isn't the best soil, so many older farmers are selling their land off in 5 acre plots. A person used to living on a 80 x 120 lot feels if he buys that 5 acres , that is a huge amount of land he never imagined.

Immediately he buys his young boys 4 wheeler ATV's ( cuz they own soooooo much land)

After a few days, the boys discover that 5 acres ( minus house and garage) isn't that much land and dad sees nothing wrong with him ripping around in my friends pastures and low ground meadows that he bales for hay.

Yup, 5 acres may be 20 times bigger than a quarter acre lot in town, but it still is only 5 acres.
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Old 01-16-2010, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Pkwy (da Bronx)
966 posts, read 2,130,840 times
Reputation: 553
Crazy stuff. Sounds more like just plain rudeness to me and a lack of understanding of the places these particular city people have moved to; that and their own warped expectations.

Now my question is what can rural people do to understand the ignorance and find a way to tell them what they clearly do not know or get.

I once asked my cousin, who lives on a sea island off the coast of Charleston, SC why people don't just come out and tell me how things work there instead of shunning me, making fun of me, assuming the worst about me (for using too much water, for ex.), or forcing me to figure it out. She said I should "just know." That's ridiculous. On the other hand, I remember once when I was a pre-teen I was sent outside to pump some water. No one had taught me anything about priming the pump. I was doing my best, with no avail, no water coming out of that pump. Thankfully, one of my cousins came outside and taught me how to prime the pump. That was great.

What's my point? To be fair, I did ask for all you pet peeves, and I am hoping for more. But everything that has been listed can be taught or discussed. What stops the local people from reaching out to a clearly floundering city person to let them know what's up? What can you do or say to help a newcomer from the big city not to be a "citiot?" (lol...still love that word)

Last edited by Nala8; 01-16-2010 at 11:28 AM..
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Old 01-16-2010, 11:27 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,682,398 times
Reputation: 8170
My friend did discuss the problem with the boy's dad.

The response was------" C'mon, he's just a kid and wants to have fun "
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Old 01-16-2010, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Pkwy (da Bronx)
966 posts, read 2,130,840 times
Reputation: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
My friend did discuss the problem with the boy's dad.

The response was------" C'mon, he's just a kid and wants to have fun "
Dang. Now that's just closed-minded and pathetic. It pays to focus on those of us who are willing to learn. Maybe think of the community as a kind of classroom. Teach the ones who want to be taught, and set clear but gentle boundaries with the ones who do not care, so that they do not completely muck it up for everyone.

Sorry to hear that. After an incident like that I know that it is natural to want to give up on all of us. I hope you won't.

Thanks.

Last edited by Nala8; 01-16-2010 at 12:32 PM..
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Old 01-16-2010, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,237 posts, read 2,760,307 times
Reputation: 1290
Nala8, We've told city folks how it works and got laughed at for our our efforts many times. Just ask. Also, we might figure that sooner or later YOU'LL figure out what you're doing wrong. My own dad did that to me a lot, but I never forgot those lessons. Picture young girl helping her father overhaul tractor moter. Hold the screwdriver close to the end of the plug to see if it is firing. I held the metal shaft of the screwdriver. Yep. It was firing. I can promise you it was. He didn't tell me to hold the plastic handle and just observe. Nope, I had to hold the metal shank and get shocked. Hang in there. We're on your side.
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