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Old 02-23-2010, 11:08 PM
 
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I have done birch, but just gotta have maple. I didn't know you could tap beets

I bet you milk moose up that way. Farmers here hate moose for tryin' ta' mate with cows, trucks, and tractors. messes up a good tractor seat bad....
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Old 02-24-2010, 03:05 AM
 
Location: Interior AK
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ROFL -- well, they haven't tried to mate with anything of mine yet... but they do love them some cabbages, have to put up poly & scare wire just to keep them out (and to keep ADF&G from accusing you of baiting the wildlife with your juicy garden).
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Old 02-24-2010, 04:24 PM
 
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Moose don't bother my garden, but white tail deer have been known to lurk around giving the sweet corn the eyball. This past August 3rd a Saturday night, I had a close call with a moose. I hit a jeep, that hit a moose, is what happened, but the deal is i was riding a motorcycle with my wife. I got to ride that motorcycle home too, and so did my wife. The 2 guys in the jeep had no idea what happend and never saw the moose till it rolled off the jeep. They were from 'away' so were not looking like I was.

I saw something that don't happen after dark, and hit the binders hard, but I evidently needed something like 111 feet, and only had 81.5 feet. Ooops

Anything that don't look right is a moose here at night as I see things, and i was as sure as I am now what I saw was a flock of 12 or so crows flittering at the road side. No can do, it don't happen and every hair on my neck was up.

Hell, I don't expect you to believe me, the cops sure didn't once they arrived, and so they shot that moose 5 times, and went up the road looking for another crash scene since none of the 4 of us were hurt. The only wound at all was the jeep driver where a splinter of windshield nicked his finger. This guy was a full blown carpet layer so that little nick ment nothing to him.

He was havin a bad time lookin at his jeep though, with the roof crushed down to with in 4 inches of the dash, the grill mashed and the rad leaking coolant.

That moose was a small male maybe 9000 maybe 1,000 pounds in velvet of course.

I went back the next day to see about this moose, now dead in head waters to important water, but I wasn't in a very good mood. Don't take the look on my face for happy. I was angery this moose died for no uses of much. After it was moved away from these waters it went for wild life scavange, other than my wife took a tooth for all about we could find. It was around 89 degrees that night.

My bike still has the damaged fender, and if i don't get some more work I will have to ride it that way this year too. The bloomin paint costs more than a new matched fender in paint... So I gotta hump up 300 bucks or ride it as is.

Moose pictures by Mac_Muz - Photobucket

The street pic is 2 tread marks I made, but the whole time I heard rubber sceeching, both brakes, the let up had rubber too, but it doesn't show in the pic. There is another 'patch to the right side i didn't do at all. i tried to find the jeep but failed, so no picy of that.
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Old 02-24-2010, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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You and the other guys were very lucky that there were no serious injuries to anything but the Jeep!!

Here anything that doesn't look right is usually a moose, a black bear, or a grizzly. None of those do you want to hit, especially since the road is narrow and windy and can dump you down a gorge if you spin off it in the wrong spot. I've got a *big* truck, with an off-road lift package, AND a big welded steel grill-grate-bumper-winch mount on the front... and I STILL wouldn't want to hit any of those big critters!

Any vehicle of "normal size" will crumple like a beer can hitting a big critter like that as they tend to popup, slid across the crumpled hood and crunch in or on the roof. I saw a moose shear the roof right off of a compact sedan on Seward Highway... not pretty, there were no survivors in that crash.

At least we don't have cops shooting the struck animals and then leaving them there to rot or be scavanged. Any moose hit by a vehicle is reported to ADF&G and then immediately harvested. In fact, it is illegal NOT to harvest the hide and meat of a struck moose or bear. They might confiscate the meat for tribal potlatch as well as the hide, but you still have to harvest it immediately at the scene of the accident. No wasting perfectly good meat up here!

We don't have deer this far north and the caribou are slightly northeast of us, so our biggest garden munchers are the moose. We have lots of little munchers though... hares hares and more hares!! And ravens the size of beagles (a simple scarecrow will not do)! Now the berry patch sees a lot of bear action though, so berry picking in the fall is a gun-toting event!
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Old 02-24-2010, 08:10 PM
 
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Your view of what happens to a vehical is dead on. We were all very lucky, unbelieveabley lucky. If i didn't have pics and damage no one would believe me. I didn't drop the bike never have, but that night I couldn't if I wanted to. It was clamped tight straight up.

My head was a mess... I was trying to make sure my wife was ok, the giys in the jeep were ok which I doubted at first, but was surprised they were, Sweating bullets cars from behind would get the idea since there were none, and that is a sweeper corner, so little warning, and then there was tha moose i saw drag itself off the road and all I had was a NAA mini mag with 5 measly .22 mags in it.. That didn't seem like a real good idea to me in the dark after 9 pm.

The moose lays where the cops shot it that 5 times. 3 with a pump shot gun I assume was a 12 ga,. and 2 more shots with a side arm, again I am not sure what they carry, but think a 9mm Glock.

At around 89 degrees skinning in the swamp and or anything with the skeeters and the black flies and everything else would be grim. I wanted to do something, but alone with my wife in that spot would have been living hell. My wife took the pic of me and my best ugly face.

I lived because I have mad a habit at night in these boonies to not pass, and always have a 4 wheel vehical ahead of me. I learned i need more room at night to react. A battered fender is a light price to pay. Manitoe was with us that night fer sartin.

Ak is likely to be set up better than NH is for harvest at these odd times and places. The state was going to just simply leave it. I joined with private parties to assist the move, to a higher dry place, far away from civilization, where my wife did snip a few neck hairs, for rememberance, and prayers. I thought about parts for a loong time and decided against any, a Manitoe thing with me. But I didn't like any part of this one.
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Old 02-24-2010, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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Summer kills can be gruesome and grueling to harvest, but at least we have plenty of light up here (is it nay or dight?) Luckily no roads are that close to deep muskegs so harvesting in a swamp isn't that common for roadkills... plus at least one person always has a winch on their vehicle to drag the carcass out if necessary. Practicalities of living in the wild I guess

All I can say is those 5 shots were way overkill!! Either these guys didn't know how to shoot for a kill (at least the shotgunners) or they were packing seriously light loads... even a tiny 9mm behind the ear will kill a moose, fer sure blowing it's head off with a 12 ga should have done it with one shot. But they probably couldn't or didn't want to get in close enough range for a humane kill shot, eh?

Farming in remote rural areas that are neighbors to real wilderness does require a little bit different tactics and logistics than farming in a more populated rural setting... you have a whole different set of rules for predators, scavengers and pilferers between the two locations! For instance, we do have some coyotes, which are horrible threats to livestock elsewhere; but here they're not so bad because the wolves and wolverines keep them in check! Of course most people on the average rural "country" farm don't have to deal with lynx, wolves, wolverines, black bears, or brown bears strolling through their farmyard whenever they please on a routine basis... but wild dogs and coyotes are a big problem for them. That's why it's important to know & research the area that you're planning to set up in... not just for what will and will not grow in the area, but what threats there might be to your endeavors (animals, plants, insects, diseases, etc). You certainly wouldn't want to start an orchard in an area with a full-blown coddling moth infestation... and that's the sort of stuff a lot of real estate folks (and sellers) just sort of "forget" to mention to a prospective buyer.
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Old 03-02-2010, 08:14 AM
 
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Well I didn't go into the swamp, where the moose was shown dead. I learned to never question the state police, so for all I know they missed every time but once. I sus pect they were inside of 25 yards though. I was tempted, but didn't want to create a 'situation' with my little .22 pocket derringer, which I am unsure of for dispatching a moose from around 5 feet. The moose had 0 use of it's hind legs, so I wouldn't have feared it exactly. But getting my wife safe and the bike, then flagging down the cars that came from behind seemed the best thing to do. The bike was wedged tight under the jeep bumper, so alone even with my wife helping I could not free the bike. Once the jeep driver and his passanger were clear, and other people arrived I got help to pull the bike free.

I have attended shoots where it is two teams, the Police and the Buck Skinners. The police bring modern guns, guns I assume they use at work, and Skinners bring the type of guns we shoot at events, some caplocks and some flintlocks.

Skinners tend to win these events. The way it works is we load for the cops since they are no familar, and they load for us, since we do them the favor with their guns, so every one gets a chance to try out what ever guns there are, anyone is interested in trying.

I think the Skinners tend to win because shooting for us is a hobby sporting form and it isn't so much for cops.

Un-related, I once won a turkey shoot, where the prize was a turkey for thanksgiving. I didn't get to keep the turkey as it was said to use my 20 ga Nor West gun flintlock was some how cheating. I was shooting against modern 12 ga slug guns that had rear sites too, and my Nor' West gun has none. I was shooting a single patched 0.600 round ball.

The only time I had a problem with black bear was working for a B&B, where on Friday nights some time 2 came to tear at cabins once used for guests, but not repaired in timely fashion, and then used to house chickens. The bears did this for 3 Friday nights in a row before I could get F&G to come at all, and I was havin a hissy fits some kid would go to see the 3 little pigs, the turkey pen, the horse, and or the chickens, and get mauled.

The first thing F&G did was set up an electric fence, which the bears tore down seemingly with no problem. Then they used a culvert pipe trap and caught the little bear. That appeared to be all they could do, and one day when I was on a horse as it happened and had a Ruger Super Blackhawk on .44 mag the bear was there. I yelled the bear ran and I took chase, and went right to the top of a small mountian called Tyroll chasing that bear. I had the gun in my hand in case the bear decided to turn since I was at around 6 feet behind. Had it turned and I would have shot.

That likey would have ended that bear, and my problem, since I practiced shooting that way at a full bore run. My horse had been trained by me to go to Voo, and to stand for a 6 pounder cannon. The training began with a BB gun, and over time larger louder guns, to the point I could drop a shot gun/ rifle over her back and shoot from a 'rest'. That didn't all happen over night by anymeans. it started by shooting near by and letting her hear it, then letting her sniff the gun and the smells any gun produces, so it wasn't a wild idea of the instant for me or her. I had to train her for flapping canvass too, which was easy as my barn had a 'Gull Wing" at the peak, and I just hung painter drop cloths there to drift in the winds.
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Old 03-02-2010, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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I've only shot a BP rifle once and it knocked me on my tuckus!! Definitely more of a kick than the new fangled ported barrels for sure. My 22LR is so old it doesn't even have a serial number (BATFE just *loves* that), but still shoots like a charm and I can plink off marmots and grouse all day with her.

Since we've got black and brown bears up here, our typical defense is 12 ga pump alternately loaded with 3" hot slugs and 00 mag buck shot. First in tube is the 00, aim for the face to peel up the nose and eyes so it's harder for them to find you, and then follow up with the slug in the chest if you can. Of course, that's only if it's charging you. Most times if they're just hanging around you can shoo them away or scare them firing a round in the air... some of them will even high-tail it just hearing you rack the shotgun LOL Smart bears! But it isn't very populated out here so the bears have plenty of room to roam and forage, so they pretty much leave us alone as long as we're not stupid with food and garbage. Might have a bit more issues once we get livestock, but hopefully not. We'll have to put up electric barbed wire around the barn since smooth electric wire doesn't even phase them with their thick fur... the barbed wire is usually just pointy enough to get in the fur a bit and give them a little juice. Couple years ago a bear ripped the corner right out of a friend of mine's barn and ate two of her milking goats, after she put up the e-barb hasn't had a problem since.

Training your animals to deal with firearms, loud equipment and things like flapping canvas is a long process. Our dog, Ripley, doesn't like the loud boom but she's not afraid anymore... which is kind of bad since she's still young enough not to always remember to stay out of the line of fire and don't jump on us! Same problem with the chainsaw... dog is seriously going to get one of us hurt one day before she grows out of the hyper puppy phase. When I worked on a ranch out in Colorado, all the horses had to be trained to deal with shotguns since we all carried them out on the range for rattlesnakes and coyotes. One of the mustangs would march right up to a rattlesnake and then turn to look at you, like "well, I found it, so are you going to kill it or what?" He'd stand right there while the gun went off and then trample the remains of snake into dirt... he seriously hated snakes LOL

Keeping yourself and your livestock safe when you farm in the wilds can be a challenge in more ways than one!
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Old 03-06-2010, 01:20 AM
 
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Any idea on getting a farming job? Do all farms now require workers on the fields to have a BS in Agriculture? If I can't have my own farm then I would like to work on one. I will be graduating HS early so will be searching forums and ads for farm hand jobs. Wan't to get out there and start tending to the crops .
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Old 03-07-2010, 01:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by rgomez912 View Post
Any idea on getting a farming job? Do all farms now require workers on the fields to have a BS in Agriculture? If I can't have my own farm then I would like to work on one. I will be graduating HS early so will be searching forums and ads for farm hand jobs. Wan't to get out there and start tending to the crops .
No BS is optional, but I think Spanish is mandatory
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