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Old 02-17-2010, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, NY
723 posts, read 1,113,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
You'd be hard pressed to find an area of the USA that is "less sunny" than the Olympic Peninsula area, or Western WA state.

In my view, it's a pretty dreary climate for many months of the year, with virtually no sunshine at all for days on end. Endless drizzle, overcast, interrupted by heavy rain and squalls.

Just inland from the WA coast, it's not uncommon for the snow line to be starting somewhere around 2,500' elevation .... and the snow pretty much stays all winter as it builds up.

About the only way this area fits the OP's wish list is that it's got a bunch of "little towns" ... and not many, at that. It's a fairly sparsely populated region of the country.
That's true, and it would depend on what OP considers what sort of population range for a small town. Western WA has places ( outside of Sea/Tac metro areas or Olympia ) that range from sizes of that of Aberdeen, or Longview, down to Forks or Sequim and even smaller than that.

The Olympic Peninsula is a rain-forest unto itself, especially the Hoh River Rain Forest and the park surrounding it near Forks. 200+ in. of rain a year--outside of an area of Kauai, Hawaii, it is the wettest, grayest spot in the USA.
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Old 02-18-2010, 11:00 AM
 
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Just had a thought--Sequim. On the Olympic Peninsula, so many people naturally assume it's wet, wet, wet. Might be wetter than some places, but it is in the rain shadow of the Olympics, so not near the rain as say, Forks, but still really green.
Over the years it's turned into quite a retirement area as well because of the mild climate.
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Old 02-20-2010, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Kalamazoo
80 posts, read 174,160 times
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San Luis Obispo, CA might fit the bill.
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Old 02-22-2010, 09:46 PM
 
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sonora california
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Old 02-26-2010, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,174,079 times
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The only places in Oregon that could meet your criteria are in the southern tip, like Ashland or Grants Pass. Other than that, Western Oregon like doesn't provide nearly enough sunny days for you. And Eastern Oregon is NOT what I consider "green".

Spokane does definitely rain less than Seattle; however, it snows a fair amount there. It's very pretty with lots of pine trees. But I wouldn't call Spokane necessarily a "small town".
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesbabe View Post
The only places in Oregon that could meet your criteria are in the southern tip, like Ashland or Grants Pass. Other than that, Western Oregon like doesn't provide nearly enough sunny days for you. And Eastern Oregon is NOT what I consider "green".

Spokane does definitely rain less than Seattle; however, it snows a fair amount there. It's very pretty with lots of pine trees. But I wouldn't call Spokane necessarily a "small town".
There are pockets of "green" in eastern Oregon...Wallowa Valley comes to mind, as does Prairie City and LaGrande areas. Of course, they aren't "Willamette Valley Green", but few places are!

You're right, Spokane is definitely not small. But there are lots and lots of small towns around it...if you go north of it, definitely green!
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
There are pockets of "green" in eastern Oregon...Wallowa Valley comes to mind, as does Prairie City and LaGrande areas. Of course, they aren't "Willamette Valley Green", but few places are!

You're right, Spokane is definitely not small. But there are lots and lots of small towns around it...if you go north of it, definitely green!
Hadn't thought of the Wallowa area. Honestly, I haven't spent time in that part of Eastern Oregon. Wonder if the small artsy town of Joseph would fit the bill??? And for such a small place in the middle of nowhere, it has it's excitement ~ Chief St. Joseph Days (which I understand is a kick in the seat of the pants), and a terrific blues festival.
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Old 02-26-2010, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, NY
723 posts, read 1,113,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesbabe View Post
The only places in Oregon that could meet your criteria are in the southern tip, like Ashland or Grants Pass. Other than that, Western Oregon like doesn't provide nearly enough sunny days for you. And Eastern Oregon is NOT what I consider "green".

Spokane does definitely rain less than Seattle; however, it snows a fair amount there. It's very pretty with lots of pine trees. But I wouldn't call Spokane necessarily a "small town".
I think Coeur d'Alene, ID would be a better fit. Green year-round, fair amount of rain/sunshine/cold winters, pleasant summers, low crime, low cost of living, and the city is about 50k people.
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Old 02-28-2010, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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What about Flatstaff, AZ?
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Old 02-28-2010, 11:16 AM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,316,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe moving View Post
What about Flatstaff, AZ?
I assume you mean Flagstaff.

This is a place which can get some serious winter weather and snowfall accumulations ...

and then be very dry (and brown) during the summer months.
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