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Old 10-20-2010, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,304,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cl723 View Post
Boise is not green either. It`s very brown.
As the climate continues to change and drought-stricken regions worsen; there are few places West or South of the Rockies that are green.

Last edited by Submariner; 10-20-2010 at 12:52 PM..
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Old 10-20-2010, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Heading to the NW, 4 sure.
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Western New Mexico. We have Juniper, Pinon Pine and after the summer rains, lots of sunflowers.
Some snow each year, some years not much some years up to 2 ft.
October is about in the 70's -60's, nights about 40.

Where we are: you can see for miles. Lots of elk,deer, etc.

Check out: Fence Lake, Quemado, Pie Town..
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Old 10-20-2010, 02:24 PM
 
4,925 posts, read 9,901,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
As the climate continues to change and drought-stricken regions worsen; there are few places West or South of the Rockies that are green.
Boise has been brown before the words "climate change" or "global warming" were ever thought of.

The areas of the west I'm most familiar with haven't changed over my 50+ years. However, when they only get 6-9 inches of precip a year, how could you tell?
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Old 10-20-2010, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
22,191 posts, read 22,670,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie Jo View Post
Utah's wages are so low and many have two jobs in order to live there.
Yes, Utah's wages are lower than the national average, but so is the cost of living.

Quote:
In that Mormon area you better be Mormon to get a job. That is my own opinion. I could be wrong.
You are wrong. Since Utah has one of the nation's lowest unemployment rates in the nation, if not the lowest, apparently a pretty substantial number of non-Mormons are also employed. This is from a recent issue of Forbes:

But some areas are doing better than others, and for many of them, it isn't an accident. Who's doing the best job when it comes to fostering growth? Utah, according to our fifth annual look at the Best States for Business. The Beehive State captured the top spot in our rankings for the first time, after a four-year run by Virginia at the head of the list.

Slide Show: The Best States For Business


Utah's economy has expanded 3.5% annually over the past five years, faster than any other state except North Dakota. This is three-and-a-half times faster than the U.S. as a whole. Total employment in the U.S. has shrunk over the past five years, but in Utah it increased 1.5% annually, fourth-best in the nation. Household incomes have surged 5% annually, which is tops in the country and twice as fast as the national average.

As for a "green" rural area in Utah, possibly Heber City would work for you. This is from their website:

"Tourism is a year-round industry in the Heber Valley, providing opportunities for cross-country and downhill skiing, golfing, hot air balloon rides, hiking, boating, boating, fishing and many other outdoor activities. Heber City is home to the Heber Valley Historic Railroad (HVRR). The valley is in the neighborhood of three large reservoirs, Jordanelle, Deer Creek, and Strawberry, and is surrounded by state and federal lands. Heber City is the county seat of Wasatch County. Utah Valley University has a secondary campus north of Heber City. The Heber City Municipal Airport is located at the south end the city. U.S. 40 and U.S. 189 connect Heber City to Salt Lake City, Park City, and Provo City, all within 45 minutes or less travel time."

Heber may get more snow than you'd like, though. It's kind of hard for me to say. It sure is a gorgeous area, though. Also, the population is around 10,000. That may be larger than what you're looking for.

Last edited by Katzpur; 10-20-2010 at 07:12 PM..
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Old 10-21-2010, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
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Areas of Northeast Oregon, which many people erroneously think is all desert, can be green:

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/c...hermaps/or.gif

Most of these towns are in the green area:
Local Communities Adjacent to Wallowa-Whitman National Forest
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Old 10-21-2010, 10:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karlsch View Post
Areas of Northeast Oregon, which many people erroneously think is all desert, can be green:

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/c...hermaps/or.gif

Most of these towns are in the green area:
Local Communities Adjacent to Wallowa-Whitman National Forest
This is one of my favorite regions of the nation, used to live in it and have been going there my entire life...but from an easterner's perspective, these might be called "greenish". My eastern in-laws have used the word "desolate". (A plus, in my opinion.)

Of the communities on the list, I had earlier in this thread recommended La Grande. But of the towns on that list, there's no one that would call Clarkston, Baker City, or Riggins green.

But, you don't have to go far to be in it! Personally, I think it's just about a perfect area--not desert, but not rain drenched as parts of the west coast or east.
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Old 10-27-2010, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
4,997 posts, read 6,804,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
As the climate continues to change and drought-stricken regions worsen; there are few places West or South of the Rockies that are green.
Most of the Idaho panhandle is green, and the Pacific northwest as well as northeastern Washington and northwestern Montana. Lots of water and lots of forests.
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Old 10-27-2010, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,304,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriverranch View Post
Most of the Idaho panhandle is green, and the Pacific northwest as well as northeastern Washington and northwestern Montana. Lots of water and lots of forests.
Yes. There are a minority of regions that are not very dry out West.

I lived in Washington for 4 years.

That does not change the problems of most of the West.
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Old 10-27-2010, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
4,997 posts, read 6,804,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Yes. There are a minority of regions that are not very dry out West.

I lived in Washington for 4 years.

That does not change the problems of most of the West.
Okay...
I thought the OP here was looking for a place in the west that is green so I think it's probably more helpful to tell him/her the places that are green, rather than aren't. No?
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Old 10-31-2010, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Rivendell
1,387 posts, read 2,188,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cl723 View Post
This is probably a long shot but I`m looking for a small town in the west that is "green," not desert. More sunny days than cloudy. I don`t mind cool temps and a little snow, but not tons of it and not single digits.

There is a string of small towns on the west side of Trinity County, in Northern CA. I think the largest one has a population of 300.
The weather is great, little snow in the lower elevations, very lush and green. It is not cold and gloomy like the coast, and not hot and dry like Redding.

I can't say enough nice things about this area. I couldn't imagine a more beautiful place to live.

But the unemployment is high and there are lots of pot farmers.
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