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Old 11-01-2010, 10:41 PM
 
3,884 posts, read 9,047,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriverranch View Post
Prescott, AZ? Not desert but is dry. Lots of ponderosa pines. Mostly sunny days, can get snow but not huge amounts. Nice town with big grassy town square surrounding the old courthouse. I love Prescott (pronounced like "press-kit").
I was going to say that or Payson, AZ.
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Old 11-01-2010, 11:01 PM
 
Location: San Angelo, TX
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Answer: any of the towns in Eastern Washington along the Idaho border, and any town along the Columbia River. I loved visiting Richmond and Kennewick, WA, beautiful area.

http://www.marlerblog.com/uploads/im...gton-state.jpg
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Old 11-02-2010, 02:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danbo1957 View Post
Answer: any of the towns in Eastern Washington along the Idaho border, and any town along the Columbia River. I loved visiting Richmond and Kennewick, WA, beautiful area.

http://www.marlerblog.com/uploads/im...gton-state.jpg
Not really....you surely can't call Clarkston, Pullman, Asotin green, nor anything along the Columbia between Richland/Kennewick/Pasco (Tri-Cities) and The Dalles green--especially since that area is pretty much desert.

Now, the border area of Idaho and Washington from Spokane/Couer d'Alene NORTH is pretty green---except for the time of year that it is white...

...but South is pretty brown. Or golden. (Lotta wheat.) Or just brown. (Lotta dry.)
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Old 11-02-2010, 05:35 PM
 
Location: San Angelo, TX
1,836 posts, read 3,060,931 times
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Dude, I was just there visiting. Desert? "Dry or golden" doesn't mean desert. And "green" doesn't only mean rainforest.

------------

A green area with nice towns is along the Pacific coast (wet winters, but rarely snows); from Pacific City, OR, down through Eureka, CA.
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Old 11-02-2010, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
4,998 posts, read 6,807,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
Not really....you surely can't call Clarkston, Pullman, Asotin green, nor anything along the Columbia between Richland/Kennewick/Pasco (Tri-Cities) and The Dalles green--especially since that area is pretty much desert.

Now, the border area of Idaho and Washington from Spokane/Couer d'Alene NORTH is pretty green---except for the time of year that it is white...

...but South is pretty brown. Or golden. (Lotta wheat.) Or just brown. (Lotta dry.)
I agree. It's pretty much irrigated desert. Bleh.
The towns along the WA/ID border are awesome ( I live in one of them on the Idaho side). And they are wonderful. Green, forested, mountains and lots of water. We do get plenty of snow though.
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Old 11-03-2010, 11:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danbo1957 View Post
Dude, I was just there visiting. Desert? "Dry or golden" doesn't mean desert. And "green" doesn't only mean rainforest.
Dude, I lived there. I figured you must have only visited since you didn't know the name of the town is Richland. Did you arrive by plane at night and not leave the motel?

Most people call 6-9 inches of annual precipitation (some of it snow) desert. It's green for maybe a couple of weeks in the spring when the weeds and cheat grass is first coming up. When the tallest natural item around is sagebrush, it ain't lush. When YOU'RE the tallest thing around, it isn't verdant. When you could watch someone run away from you for 3 days it isn't exactly thickly vegetated. When the highest hill in the area is called Rattlesnake Ridge, you probably aren't in the Garden of Eden. When the same hill is locally said to be the highest mountain west of the Mississippi without a tree on it, you likely aren't in the rainforest. When your lawn burns up in less than a week because you forgot to water it, you aren't in the rain belt. When there is a neighboring wilderness area called Juniper Dunes because of all the, well, sand dunes, you might have to consider that where you are is a tad dry, which, strangely enough, doesn't equate to green.

Take all the above and you might decide that you just might either be in a desert or in a pretty good imitation of one. In that country, you can just about figure that if you see a patch of green, it isn't there naturally.




Last edited by skinem; 11-03-2010 at 12:19 PM..
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Old 11-08-2010, 10:15 PM
 
688 posts, read 1,309,243 times
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Kamiah and Kooskia, Idaho. Almost constant sunshine and warm in summer, still usually cool nights, though, green for that part of the country (especially in timbered mountain area immediately to East of there in Selway and Lochsa River areas), lots of vegetation and trees. What I've noticed about the West (being from Ky.) is usually if you have a place that is green and lots of vegetation that isn't sagebrush or scrub brush is either Northern California coast or Pacific Northwest with drizzly dismal marine climate or if inland, very high in elevation but still below timber line, where you get lots of winter snowfall. Kamiah, for that far north and inland, does not have particularly harsh winter, either. Otherwise, you won't see too many green places that are equivalent to places east of Mississippi River.
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Old 11-08-2010, 10:27 PM
 
688 posts, read 1,309,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skylar0201 View Post
Uhm, where you getting your source? if you're going by Sperling's data, I don't trust them for a few reasons:

First, where I lived previously before Portland, the crime rate in the other city was MUCH, MUCH worse--all areas of the city, as compared to Portland, but it listed Portland as being worse.

Secondly, the unemployment data that Sperling's lists Portland, a few other cities I have found out, is not accurate either. I don't know how often they update their data, but they need to correct it. Current unemployment in Portland in Feb 2010 city results is at 15.6%--not the 10.4% it listed it at--those are ongoing claims, not including those who have ran out of benefits or stopped looking. Omaha, NE is another city it is off. Omaha's unemployment according to Sperling is still listed at 4.7%. Try closer to about 3 or 3.5% as of Jan 2010. Sperling's data is getting older and they aren't updating it.

Third, what I have found out--and this would work for any city or town, is call the chamber of commerce, get a relocation packet, and get ones from other cities about the same size as one you're considering--in the same region where one is considering moving to. It is MUCH more reliable doing it that way than looking up stats online that are not updated or have multiple sources.

When I said that Couer d'Alene had roughly 50k people, I was including any small towns around it, and recent boom of population of California transplants moving there ( Idaho as a whole is the #1 state CA transplants are relocating to. AAA, and DMV offices are providing this information ) so if Couer d'Alene had 42,222 in 2008 or 2009, along with daily commuters that go back & forth between there and Spokane, WA--a mere 20 min drive away, that figure is surely a lot closer to 50k than you might think. We'll get a better estimate when the 2010 census #'s are released this year.

Not saying you're wrong on all your info, just saying that there is more than one source that you should check.
Sounds to me like Idaho is being invaded by Californians the same way Florida and North Carolina are by New York and Jersey types.
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Old 11-08-2010, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
4,998 posts, read 6,807,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxpwas View Post
Kamiah and Kooskia, Idaho. Almost constant sunshine and warm in summer, still usually cool nights, though, green for that part of the country (especially in timbered mountain area immediately to East of there in Selway and Lochsa River areas), lots of vegetation and trees. What I've noticed about the West (being from Ky.) is usually if you have a place that is green and lots of vegetation that isn't sagebrush or scrub brush is either Northern California coast or Pacific Northwest with drizzly dismal marine climate or if inland, very high in elevation but still below timber line, where you get lots of winter snowfall. Kamiah, for that far north and inland, does not have particularly harsh winter, either. Otherwise, you won't see too many green places that are equivalent to places east of Mississippi River.
We're not high in elevation (2500 ft) here near Priest Lake, but are very green (dense conifer forest) and we do get a pretty snowy winter. not harsh by say...Montana standards but we do get a lot of snow.
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Old 12-09-2010, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Redding, CA
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Default Humboldt, Trinity, and Shasta counties

I'm not sure exactly what type of "green" you are looking for but Redding, CA has a temperate climate. Summers get hotter than most areas in California (sometimes 100 plus) but overall, it is wonderful.

Trinity county is more green I would say than Redding (Shasta county), it's more rural unspoiled land. It is primarily mountainous and forest land, full of creeks, lakes, and rivers.

Humboldt county is more towards the coast, so you will have more the "rain forest" effect.

All in all, Shasta, Trinity and Humboldt counties are very green!!

Landry
L7Designs
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