U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-18-2010, 09:24 PM
 
4,247 posts, read 10,680,942 times
Reputation: 3126

Advertisements

10 miles from a Wally World in the USA is considered rural. j/k


I hope to be in a rural place in 15-20yrs from now but nothing like the person in Alaska. Cloudcroft, NM is rural enough for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-19-2010, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,735,067 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by danieloneil01 View Post
...but nothing like the person in Alaska
I've had my slightly rural place sucked up and destroyed by urban sprawl more than once.

This time I wanted to get far enough out that population increases and any urban/suburban expansion would take years to impact my place. Which, hopefully, won't be until I'm well and properly 6-feet under (if ever).

I think the only place "safer" from all that nonsense would be Greenland... and I'm totally prepared to move there if it gets too crowded here in AK
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2010, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,568 posts, read 2,434,230 times
Reputation: 1967
Just found this forum. How fun. I consider us as living rural. We are 20 miles from a town of 5000+. Here we have 150 to 180 people in the city. Close to 600 people in the one zip code.City is one grocery store as in small version of Walmart. Heheheh I took pictures for fun awhile ago. Not my market not advertising. Just a fun place. And will make joke of calling it Walmart.
Pyle Meadows - Midvale Market

We have a library, post office, school, telephone company, swimming pool in season and a bar. You can do town in about 5 minutes tops.
http://midvaleidaho.com/


There is a cafe here no gas station. That would be nice to have. The closest station is about 10 miles away in the opposite direction from the larger town of 5000.There is one stop light in the next town down of 5000. Then another 16 miles and into Oregon to real shopping and a real walmart.

We used to be 189 miles from a K-mart and that was a drag shopping every 6 months weather permitting.No internet then.

We shop the local market and sales in the larger towns and internet to fill in. I am not a fan of serious shopping so it is go get what is on the list and get home.

Chris

Last edited by shades_of_idaho; 05-06-2010 at 12:37 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2010, 07:58 PM
 
Location: DFW
23 posts, read 28,929 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by danieloneil01 View Post
10 miles from a Wally World in the USA is considered rural. . . .

That's the sad truth. That it's considered rural with one that close; that "rural" even has one that close. Either way you slice it it's harder and harder to stay rural for very long because of the mass of humanity moving out of . . . the mass of humanity.

We live on a county road that was only paved recently. Now we get 15 to 20 cars down our road a day. That's counting the 3 or 4o of our nearest neighbors who go to town every now and then like we do.

We're ready to be somewhere that see less than that in a year. Only thing is I hate cold wetaher and that's about all that's left unless we want to parachute into the amazon or sahara.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2010, 10:03 PM
 
4,249 posts, read 8,252,505 times
Reputation: 5089
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
I don't mind driving into the village to stock up on gas for the vehicles and generator, or to have the propane bottles (the little ones) refilled. It's a heck of a lot cheaper to buy it all in bulk from the fuel depot in the city though, you know, the big 55 gallon drums?! But that's really only cost-effective if you're already in town on a stocking run and have space in the truck for the drums (and a way to get them out of the truck when you get home!). You can also purchase and fill the larger propane bottles in the city, but you are limited to the portable sizes... no one delivers propane out here to the large permanent buried or aboveground tanks and there's really no way to fill a big tank from littler tanks without a bunch of hassle and loss. Kerosene and/or fuel oil can also be problematic, since you can only get those in the city reliably (sometimes someone in the village may have extra they'll sell you for a pretty penny).
55 gallon drums are more accessible here as the city where you refill them is *only* 2 hours away. A propane stove with a couple of drums to last longer, is a near-term idea of ours, - just to get away from all that electric waste, -

How about stopping depending on fossil fuel completely and getting one of those kitchen stoves that they had 100 years ago with a water box on on one side where water is heated by the wood chamber, and an oven chamber on the other side, and on top you can move the pan around from the center (very hot) to the perimeter (lower heat). In summer months (or a month in AK j/k), since no one wants to be in a heated house, a combination of propane outdoor cooker and an outdoor fire pit could do, in some covered outdoor cooking area?

What's interesting is that my husband still remembers that kind of stove his grandma was using, while raising 3 kids and looking after a cow, a couple of oxes, and chickens. We are living on the very same old homestead and in theory could revive the way they lived.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2010, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,735,067 times
Reputation: 3364
We heat the house and water, and cook, mostly on our woodstove. In the summer, we tend to use the firepit or grill (both wood) more than the stove. The propane is primarily for our portable backup heater, a little countertop stove for when you want coffee or a quick reheat without getting the woodstove going, and a humungoid BTU burner that I do all my canning on since it's hard to maintain perfectly even temps on a wood stove, grill or firepit. The kerosene is for our other portable backup heater and all our oil lamps. All our vehicles and equipment run on gasoline, but a 55 gal drum would last us a long time unless we had to drive into the city (that uses up about 35 gallons for a round trip).

Eventually, we'll be making our own ethanol and will convert all the gasoline stuff over to that (it's dry enough here that water in the fuel lines isn't a problem). I'm looking into replacing our kerosene laterns with olive oil if I can find a reasonably priced supplier of lampanate grade oil (which is normally 1/3 - 1/2 the pice of food grade when you buy in bulk). Don't know if I can replace the propane with bio-gas since it's a little too cold to keep an anaerobic digester running, but we don't really use that much.

We're trying to get off as much of the petro-fuels as possible!! I do feel a twinge of guilt about the food miles the lampanate olive oil might incur, but there are really no good oil seed crops that grow up here I could try flax or sunflower oil, but I don't know how well that would burn or how much I'd have to grow to make it work for our needs... and where to find a decent oil press that won't cost a fortune!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2010, 07:32 AM
 
4,249 posts, read 8,252,505 times
Reputation: 5089
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
and where to find a decent oil press that won't cost a fortune!
You could have seen this website already, - how to make an oil press. I was researching about pressing my own sunflower oil, - my childhood was spent with sunflower oil, still can't get used to the odorless canola and olive oils. Miss that smell poured on hot potatoes and the khalva - confectionery they made from the whatever was left after the pressing process.

Oil Press

Russia Khalva - Traditional Russian Dessert (the recipe itself lists walnuts only even though sunflower seeds are mentioned in the description... )

- maybe this homemade press is a lot of effort and not enough resulting oil, I don't know yet, - but at this point I would try it as a first step.

Last edited by nuala; 05-11-2010 at 08:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2010, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,735,067 times
Reputation: 3364
Great article and good ideas. I have a friend with a welder, so that press might just work. Since we're growing oil seed, not having to hull and winnow is a big bonus. We'll be feeding the press cakes to the chickens (and maybe the goats) as supplemental winter feed since they need the extra calories in our arctic winters.

I like the smell of sunflower oil and I do prefer it on salads. The only thing I've found it doesn't work as good as safflower oil for is deep frying chicken... but I only make that 3-4 times a year, so I can deal

I think I've had that dessert, or something similar before. We'll also be growing confectionary sunflowers since I love to eat the seeds and they make great portable protein. We save the hulls from those and use a scoop as kindling in our woodstove... works great.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2010, 04:47 PM
 
Location: CA
830 posts, read 2,400,273 times
Reputation: 1010
I live in a small town where there is a little grocery store, drugstore, hardware, gas, hospital with visiting doctors, and lots of souvenir shops.

So, I can't think of anything crucial I can't get immediately that I would die without.

However, if you want a supermarket, a clothing store, a garden shop, etc, it's a 55 mile drive in one direction (to a town of 3,500, with a Kmart and Vons) or 75 in the other direction (to a town of 24,000 with a Walmart, Home Depot, Stater Bros).

If you want a greater variety than that, you'd be traveling 2.5 hours to the nearest city.

I don't mind it, but it does take some planning which I'm not always the best at. I also hate spending a lot of money in one trip (even though I logically know I spend less that way than I would buying little things every day). The biggest annoyance is when I need something suddenly for school, say a bag of beads or something, and I haven't planned ahead. I can't make the trip on a weekday evening, so it means waiting for a weekend. Or sometimes food purchases. If I forget the bok choy on my trip to the supermarket, there's no way I'm going to find bok choy in my town so that recipe will have to wait until next week!

I do a lot of online ordering, but that can be problematic in another way - we don't get home mail delivery so if I can't get to the post office during open hours (when I'm at work) I can't pick up packages bigger than what fits in my PO Box.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2010, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,568 posts, read 2,434,230 times
Reputation: 1967
Bigcats we do not get home delivery here either. Every one in town has a po box. I do not have the same trouble getting to it you do. But our post office also had large lock boxes they will put a larger package in and leave the Key in our small pobox.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:07 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top