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Old 12-08-2013, 01:32 PM
 
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I want to raise some cattle and I'm thinking Angus, but have no idea how to get started. We currently rent out 10 acres of alfalfa and I've given notice to the farmer that in 2015 I will no longer lease the land.

My questions to get started are on getting the land ready and equipment. Our land is open, no stream or river and no fences. We do have one out building that can be used as a wind break. I know I need a water source and fencing, but what else do I need?

Do I need to make pasture land in spring 2015 and then get cattle in 2016?

How many head of cattle can be supported on 10 acres?

Thanks,

Brent
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Old 12-09-2013, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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Completely depends on where you live.
Florida? 10 acres could probably support 10 cows.
Western Kansas? 10 acres could support about half a cow...
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Old 12-09-2013, 01:48 PM
 
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We are in Northern Indiana.
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Old 12-09-2013, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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Get ahold of your local extension agent. They can tell you what stocking rates are in your area.
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Old 12-10-2013, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Good advice Fred. Look into rotational grazing, a method to get the most out of your pasture. If you are going to work the cattle yourself, you need a working pen and a head chute. You'll need a source for hay for the winter months. They also need supplemental salt and minerals, and some grain as an extra protein source, as needed. Out of curiousity, what were you renting the land for per acre?
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Old 12-10-2013, 06:31 PM
 
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Thanks Fred and tambre. We charge $125 per acre.

Under good pasture conditions during the warm months, and I rotate, how many head of cattle can live on 10 acres? My total guess is 5?
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Old 12-10-2013, 06:33 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tambre View Post
My dh and I are going to be buying some beef cattle this year, and have no experience with cattle at all. We would like to raise cow/calf pairs and sell the calfs after weaning.

Our neighbor is willing to help us learn about cattle feeding, care, vaccinations, etc. We have fenced property with water in each pasture, and 60 bales of hay from last year's harvest. We don't have a round pen to work them in, yet, but our neighbor would let us use his for the time being.

What would be the best kind/breed of cattle to get started. In this area, Angus or other breed black cows have calves that bring the highest $ at sale.

Do we need to buy purebred cattle, or mixed? They cost about $1,000 for a springer cow and about $1,200 for cow/calf pairs. We might start with about 5 cow calf pairs, or 6-7 springers. The breeds available around here that are purebred are Charlais, Hereford, Angus, Gelbvieh, Simmenthal, and mixtures of the same, with a smattering of Brahman and other breeds in there. (Sorry about the spelling ).

The criteria we would look for are: gentle and easy to work with, and ease in calving and easy keepers.
You might want to check out highland cattle. They are good for meat and milk and they pretty much take care of themselves.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 12-11-2013, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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Quote:
Under good pasture conditions during the warm months, and I rotate, how many head of cattle can live on 10 acres? My total guess is 5?
It all comes back to stocking rate. What did your extension agent say?

This is such an area-specific question, there's no way we can answer it... Personally, even rotating, I'd never be able to stock more than 1.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:02 AM
 
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I've been a rotational grazing dairy farmer for 14 years before retiring and selling the dairy farm to my son in 2007.

We lived along a state highway and many people stopped who were very enthused and asked questions about it because they wanted to start.

I cut right to the chase and burst their bubble by asking............" do you have a source to supply you with hay because over 50% of the year you will be feeding hay "?

I lived in MN and I doubt in Indiana he will be able to graze over 6 months unless his stocking rate is real low.
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Management-Intensive Grazing in Indiana - Purdue Extension
http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/AY/ay-328.pdf



Here is an article about stocking rates in your area using rotational grazing methods. If you know any local farmers who raise cattle, they could be a great resource.

Last edited by tambre; 12-11-2013 at 09:46 PM..
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