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Old 03-24-2010, 07:36 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,098 posts, read 22,617,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasGrace View Post
So a hybrid is not genetically altered?

I'm a layman...but I thought 'hybrid' was altering...and I thought they did that by genetics.
A hybrid is simply a cross between two different plants. It happens in Nature as well fairly frequently.

Genetic engineering goes much further, and genes are inserted unnaturally. Genes from entirely non-related plants, animals, fish and even humans, through genetic engineering, can be added.
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Old 03-24-2010, 08:38 PM
 
1,492 posts, read 7,031,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Cross a labrador retriever and a poodle and you have a hybrid. Go into a laboratory, splice the DNA from a labrador retriever and a salmon and you have a genetically modified organism.

Thanks for that simple explaination.


But if the labrador retriever and poodle were crossed genetically in a laboratory..then that would be genetically modification?

But when it happens naturally in nature it's just a hybrid?
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Old 03-24-2010, 11:16 PM
 
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No, it would be called a mutt.
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Old 03-25-2010, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Valley City, ND
625 posts, read 1,675,868 times
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Theres a big difference between 100 acres and tens of thousands. I'm sure farm sizes are probably similar between ND and IA, but I know several farmers who buy seed by the semi-truck load. Maybe 420 bushels if they have 10 quarters of corn up to 1800 bu. if they have 10 sections. That's a big difference from a few bushels, well, probably 30 or 35 bushels, to plant 100 acres.



Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Don't jump on me, it was posted on another forum so I thought I'd post it here. I'm not an expert on the availability of seed out there. Although shipping of vast amounts of seed may add to their cost, and they may not be aware of a source in MN for seed, FWIW.

I'm not growing much corn myself, but some of my relatives who still have a farm here will be growing about a hundred acres of it this year. No GMO seed either.

Last edited by 3-Oaks; 03-25-2010 at 12:08 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 03-25-2010, 02:37 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,159,256 times
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The USDA considers corn growers of any size to be 750 acres or more. (Neither here nor there, just stating what the distinction is).

As for milk prices, I agree, but what a lot of non-farmers do not realize is, there is a bunch of little things that bring the break-even-point of milk to the 18 dollar a hundred weight price. If we could reduce that, then you start becoming profitable much earlier on. Since our biggest costs are in labor and in diesel fuel, those are two things that GMO corn (Now outlawed in Maine) really helped with. We could plant it, and forget it, giving us tons of feed per acre with not a lot of fuel or labor costs.

Of course if we had those tools AND could get the milk price to where it was 2 years ago at 24 dollars per hundred weight...oh my we could actually be profitable. That would be hard to take, making profit while working 7 days a week, 365 days a year!
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Old 03-25-2010, 06:54 AM
 
2,900 posts, read 4,010,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Cross a labrador retriever and a poodle and you have a hybrid. Go into a laboratory, splice the DNA from a labrador retriever and a salmon and you have a genetically modified organism.
Right....you get a retriever who wants to go back to the place of his birth every year!

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Old 03-25-2010, 10:08 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,689,142 times
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The only thing allowing many dairy farmers to stay in business today is the low interest rates.

I started dairy farming on my own in 1982 and interest rates sky rocketed.

Dairy farms were dropping right and left.

The same will happen in the future when interest rates sky rocket.
( yes, I use the word when, rather than if )
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Old 03-25-2010, 07:00 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,159,256 times
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I am not sure how it is going to play out. I think interest rates will go up, but we have hit such a rock bottom in the industry that the price of milk can only go up. It simply has to, milk is a staple of the American diet.

But my point was, the US Gov controls the price of milk, so really the only way for dairy farmers to "make it", is to reduce their overhead. GMO corn seed does just that and more. As Arctichomesteader says, its more then just GMO corn that does that, and I agree, but GMO corn does help.
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Old 03-25-2010, 07:02 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,098 posts, read 22,617,206 times
Reputation: 9375
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3-Oaks View Post
Theres a big difference between 100 acres and tens of thousands. I'm sure farm sizes are probably similar between ND and IA, but I know several farmers who buy seed by the semi-truck load. Maybe 420 bushels if they have 10 quarters of corn up to 1800 bu. if they have 10 sections. That's a big difference from a few bushels, well, probably 30 or 35 bushels, to plant 100 acres.
Those farms out there are a lot bigger than anything I know of in New England. But if you had to deal with the rocks, hills, incredibly expensive land, expensive fuel (incl. heating), etc., like we've got here, you wouldn't want to grow thousands of acres either. A large flat field is not particularly common in most of Vermont, and neither is Maine very flat. That's why so many abandoned New England and went West.
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Old 03-29-2010, 01:57 PM
 
2,318 posts, read 1,579,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
BALONEY !

Strange that an IOWA corn farmer is stating he is being forced to use Monsanto seed.

There is a huge, well respected, seed company in Albert Lea Minnesota ( very near the Iowa border) that distributes seed into Iowa. I am looking at their thick seed catalog, and notice they have 12 pages of seed corn including conventional seed corn.

archiehomesteader----------I think this is a case Broken Tap mentioned earlier on a different threasd. Uninformed people who know little about a subject and scour the internet looking for things they can jump on the bandwagon.

I doubt a " homesteader" from VT knows much about availability of seed corn in Iowa.
If seed corn companies are not offering conventional seed corn, it's because there is not enough farmers who want it to make carrying it profitable.

Much of the time the from other companys are too exspensive for farmers to buy .

Plus most people now are out for the money, and will use whatever is the cheapest to grow . In many cases everyones to blame .
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