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Old 04-12-2010, 10:13 AM
 
Location: In front of a computer
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I've always admired Wyoming, but I may have watched 1 too many dooms day specials where Yellowstone blows and the area around it just isn't too happy. It does seem like the perfect setting though. How are the winters there?
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Old 04-12-2010, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleSW View Post
I've always admired Wyoming, but I may have watched 1 too many dooms day specials where Yellowstone blows and the area around it just isn't too happy. It does seem like the perfect setting though. How are the winters there?
If Yellowstone blows, an exceedingly unlikely event, most of the population of North America, and perhaps the Northern Hemisphere will die. There would be no summer for a number of years.

Winters are chilly. There's always some sub-zero weather. February is usually nice, often a lot of shirtsleeve weather. High altitude sun really warms things up. What snow we get is primarily March through May when it is also rather windy. How windy depends upon your exact location. Overall, there's not much snow. I don't think I've had a ground cover more than eight or ten days this winter.

I'm originally from the Chicago area, a place that makes Wyoming winters seem tropical. I lived in Colorado for thirty years, and traveled through most of the US at all seasons. Colorado has nicer weather, the best in the country. But it has gotten too many people, the wrong kind of people. Unless dire necessity demands it, I'll never leave this place. Oh yes, no state income tax either, and no state financial woes.
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Old 04-12-2010, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Idaho
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Winter isn't the only thing you'll have to deal with in Wyoming. A lot of the states out here in the West are pretty much desert. To get anything to grow you have to irrigate it. It's definitely a solvable issue, but if you're used to gardening like Ruth Stout, be ready for a change. There are places that don't have much Winter, like Texas, Nevada, Arizona, or New Mexico, but you still have to deal with the desert, and there are other political issues.

Did you want a view OF the mountains, or FROM the mountains? I've lived in some places with pretty nice views of the mountains. That's not hard to find. Views FROM the mountains are a bit harder to come by, and you'll have more access issues if you want one of them. Still doable, though, if you really want one.

Judging by your "more land between me and the neighbors the better" comment you're going to be fine with the libertarian ideology of most of the Western non-coastal states. There's plenty of land out here that's affordable, that you could sit on for days at a time and not see another person. The issues with them will be things that you probably DO want. Roads, electricity, water, phone service, internet. All doable, but maybe not cheap. A lot of the inexpensive land has lots of sand. Don't let that deter you too much. Water is an especially big issue if you want to farm much. You can grow anything in sand if you fertilize and water enough. Around here you can get a residential well permit pretty easily, but you're limited to irrigating a half acre. Getting new water rights is getting difficult, if not impossible, unless you can pull the right political strings. Make sure your land comes with the water rights.
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Old 04-12-2010, 01:45 PM
 
Location: In front of a computer
31 posts, read 86,152 times
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Winter really is my biggest hurdle in this. We're from the South and I can honestly say I wouldn't know what to do come the first snow. If I can overcome that I think the options open up. I'd love to entertain the idea of the Wyoming, Montana, Idaho sector- maybe even the Dakotas- but a country girl from the South would stick out like a sore thumb.

Quote:
Did you want a view OF the mountains, or FROM the mountains?


The mountains are beautiful- can't say living on the side of one would be conducive to the animals though. I prefer rolling hills. My husband likes to back into mountains for security and protection of the land. (Where we are now the "hills" are a joke- it's still Florida!)

I've never looked into the desert, the lack of water has really made it difficult for the people I’ve spoken too (in New Mexico) but I have heard that where possible, you can grow almost anything in the sand. I don't know if we're up for that challenge.

I guess the point of our search is really to find a community that has the same values and morals we're looking for. I just don't like where society is going and don't want to subject my children (to be) to it. If I can make a change in their lives and they make a change in someone else’s then the World is just THAT much better. I don't expect to make a huge impact- I just want my family to experience what life really has to offer.

They used to run a commercial on TV (don't know if it still runs) for Walgreens- the town of "perfect"- I'd like to live there
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Old 04-12-2010, 11:23 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
11,167 posts, read 14,808,380 times
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SW VA or NE TN perhaps?
Pretty low cost of living (no income tax in TN)
Mountains/mountain views, a fair amount of pasture and farm land in the area, and relatively mild winters.
Bunches of gorgeous pictures of the area here:
miscellaneous NE Tennessee pics...

Wasn't sure how much would "break the bank" but here is a handful of recent residential listings under 200k:
MLS# 292065 Gate City VA ~ 10 acres 159k
MLS# 291927 Marion VA~ 4 acres 108k
MLS# 291922 Marion VA~ 9 acres 175k
MLS# 292196 Troutdale VA~ 17 acres 140k (mobile home)
__
MLS# 292002 Rogersville TN~ 8 acres 150k
MLS# 292164 Rogersville TN~ 41 acres 110k (mobile home)
MLS# 292161 Rogersville TN~ 5 acres 45k (mobile home)
MLS# 291980 Jonesbourough TN~ 6 acres 190k
MLS# 292154 Elizabethton TN~ 8 acres 125k

Whether or not you'd consider these towns spoiled I don't know, but there are plenty of even smaller towns further from civilization in the area too.
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Old 04-13-2010, 01:53 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,774 posts, read 13,225,135 times
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I live in Cadiz, Ky., in the western part of the state. Last summer my step daughter and SIL bought a 3 br, 2 bath house on 14 acres for $140,000. And this is about 10 miles from 2 of the largest lakes east of the Mississippi River, and from a 170,000 acre National Recreation Area (Land Between The Lakes | HOME ).
We're about an hour from Nashville, Tn., on I-24.
My wife and I bought a 3 br, 2 bath on an acre lot about a mile and a half from downtown for $72,000. I love this area!
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Old 04-13-2010, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Jefferson County
380 posts, read 1,013,204 times
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WV, Western VA or MO may be your best options. Three of the most "free" and affordable states for the criteria you are looking for. (google freedom in the 50 states and do a little research there.) You should look for a place with 4 seasons, good soil, good ground water. I also like the fact that we don't have to deal with a few types of really irritating bugs, two types of poisonous snakes-- which are very rarely encountered-- and only a few animals which will kill your livestock.
We're in the eastern panhandle of WV at the top of the Shenandoah Valley with a bit of the blue ridge. It's a good mix of farm land and mountains throughout this region. Taxes & overburdensome regulations are relatively low throughout WV & VA. But you may be priced out of the 20 Ac+ market anywhere in the eastern panhandle of WV or east of I-81 through most of VA north of Harrisonburg.
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Old 04-13-2010, 01:55 PM
 
Location: In front of a computer
31 posts, read 86,152 times
Reputation: 31
Thank you all for your responses. I have a lot of research to do now
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Old 04-13-2010, 02:07 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,774 posts, read 13,225,135 times
Reputation: 32222
As the old commercial used to say, "You asked for it, you got it!" lol
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