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Old 04-28-2010, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
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There are lots of field workers in the rural area of our county, and some of them are housed in camps. In those cases they are "bussed" to the stores (private farm busses) as needed on particular days.

But most are actually urban workers and need to live in town where they can utilize mass transit and services. For those with limited English skills it is easier to be where your needs are within close range.
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Old 04-29-2010, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
And rural states too? Something my friends and I talk about from time to time without ever coming up with a satisfactory answer.

Our basic argument is that the US is a huge country. However, most immigrants settle in a few highly urban states, and most even settle in the urban areas of these states. Why given so many varied places to live do they choose the same one? Back in the day at least a few immigrants lit out for the territories, but now there's hardly any. Any ideas?
I'm not American but with regards to the part I bolded, and depending on how far back in the day you're referring to, N. America wanted immigrants to settle land and often it was free, provided the settler cleared it. Since the 'back in the day' time I'm thinking of agriculture was much less mechanized and therefore it was easier to start farming, as an example, if you were willing to work hard.

In my area there are no shortage of immigrants. However, they are usually German or British immigrants who sold their relatively small farms in order to buy much bigger farms here. Others are eastern Europeans, primarily Russians, generally with advanced degrees working in industries in small towns here.
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Old 04-30-2010, 07:03 PM
 
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Vt, NH, Me, all have legal immigrants, from all over the world, and living in rural towns.
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Old 04-30-2010, 07:05 PM
 
Location: southern california
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the same as us, the resources are in the city.
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Old 04-30-2010, 08:25 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,853 posts, read 30,796,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
And rural states too? Something my friends and I talk about from time to time without ever coming up with a satisfactory answer.

Our basic argument is that the US is a huge country. However, most immigrants settle in a few highly urban states, and most even settle in the urban areas of these states. Why given so many varied places to live do they choose the same one? Back in the day at least a few immigrants lit out for the territories, but now there's hardly any. Any ideas?
There is a huge hispanic community in Arkansas and Southwest Missouri thanks to our friends at Tyson Chicken. They can be found in many rural areas as well as the relatively small towns of Green Forest (Arkansas), Monett (Missouri), As well as many, many others. Wherever there is a Tyson or their competitor - George's you will find mucho mucho latinos y latinas.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 04-30-2010, 08:36 PM
 
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Yup, same thing in central Minnesota.

Two cities ( population under 3,000) have a large Hispanic population.

One has a beef packing plant, the other a turkey processing plant.

Nearly every dairy farmer with over 200 milk cows ( and there are many in my area) employ Hispanics.
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Old 04-30-2010, 08:52 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
And rural states too? Something my friends and I talk about from time to time without ever coming up with a satisfactory answer.

Our basic argument is that the US is a huge country. However, most immigrants settle in a few highly urban states, and most even settle in the urban areas of these states. Why given so many varied places to live do they choose the same one? Back in the day at least a few immigrants lit out for the territories, but now there's hardly any. Any ideas?

in my small hometown of Eastern New Mexico which is rural, there are many immigrants (Mexicans)but we have many farms,ranches and dairies to attract them, and a hatchery so they got plenty of work.
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Old 05-01-2010, 07:55 AM
 
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I'm familiar with quite a few small towns (less than 5,000 pop.) in my state and a neighboring one and most of these small towns have a sizable immigrant population. It seems like most of these small towns still have at least one factory. Some of the immigrants who've been there 10-15 years have started businesses--restaurants, stores, used-car dealerships.
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Old 05-01-2010, 10:28 AM
 
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I'm not an immigrant or an American, I'm English born from Pakistani parents. I would be wary of moving to a rural area in England because people tend to notice you more and it can feel uncomfortable. Other than the vague feeling I would be unwelcome I would prefer to live in a rural area provided it was half decent.
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Old 05-01-2010, 06:01 PM
 
Location: In transit...
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It would really depend on the immigrant. There are several reasons why one would stay in the city or move to a rural town.
These reasons (IMHO) are: ability to speak English, level of education, marketable skills, relatives/friends already living in the US, and level of dependency/need to be near their countrymen. I am sure there are a few more reasons, but these are the ones that come to mind immediately.
While many immigrants are coming to the US to work in construction, farming or other manual labor jobs, there are also those who come very well educated and they prefer (or have to) to stay in a city where they can find jobs related to their education or prior occupation. Many come on working visas, sponsored by American companies, and these are attached to the employer and can't move freely (kind of like a modern day slavery sometimes).
It is easier to learn the ways of the new country if one has friends or relatives who've been in the US for some time. These friends/family can provide much needed information and moral/financial support and help make the first year in the new country, which is probably the hardest, less stressful.
Then there is such a thing as nostalgia. For many people, whether they move to the US by choice or necessity, the adaptation to their new homeland is difficult, they miss their native country and comfort of knowing how things work. It is especially hard on older people. For them, being in close proximity to others from their native land provides comfort, an opportunity to speak their native language, an opportunity to make new friends, and a sense of community.
Younger people and children adapt the best and usually don't depend much on their ethnic community, they readily move around and blend in with the rest of the US population.
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