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Old 06-25-2010, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
I agree with what others have said about the muni "forcing" people to cap their wells and connect to muni water. Many jurisdictions impose fines, deny permits for any additional work on the property, cite you with all sorts of "health issues" to get you into court when you will almost undoubtedly be legally mandated to close your well or face more fines and/or jail time. In some places, they just simply pass a law that makes it illegal to have a well or septic on your property... voila!
Code and Zoning violations.
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Old 06-25-2010, 11:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I would assume a dug well would probably not pass inspection at all? What is the typical costs associated with a new drilled well? They will likely not be interested in the property as the owner dug the well himself as well as the septic and leechfield. Dug wells are actually very common in NH as the rural areas tend to be very backwoods with regard to some things...
I'd start by querying people in the area: your parents realtor, the licensed home inspector they intend to use, and the appropriate town and/or state offices. Was the owner qualified to do the work he performed (i.e., is he employed in construction, or...?)

I'm familiar with the White Mountain area. I've known several families there who had dug wells that provided plenty of good clean water year round, while some of their neighbors with drilled wells had problems of one kind or another. You just never know. The nicest water supply I ever had was a dug well, spring-fed. The rate of refill was phenomenal and the taste of the water put Poland Spring to shame (IMO). That's not to say I wouldn't be concerned about buying a house with a dug well, just careful as I would be with any other aspect of the purchase.
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Old 06-25-2010, 12:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilac Farm View Post
I'd start by querying people in the area: your parents realtor, the licensed home inspector they intend to use, and the appropriate town and/or state offices. Was the owner qualified to do the work he performed (i.e., is he employed in construction, or...?)

I'm familiar with the White Mountain area. I've known several families there who had dug wells that provided plenty of good clean water year round, while some of their neighbors with drilled wells had problems of one kind or another. You just never know. The nicest water supply I ever had was a dug well, spring-fed. The rate of refill was phenomenal and the taste of the water put Poland Spring to shame (IMO). That's not to say I wouldn't be concerned about buying a house with a dug well, just careful as I would be with any other aspect of the purchase.
Still they will have to get by the bacteria test.

With a dug well that can be hard to do.
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Old 06-25-2010, 12:49 PM
 
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Your local heath department will also be able to help.
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Old 06-28-2010, 07:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Pappy&Me View Post
For thoe too far from the city water they have other plans, they will put a meter on your well until the water can be piped in .

When they come to read the power meters they will read the water meter also .
You can always try to beat the system by installing a cistern. Chances are the meter on the well was legislation passed at the state level. Anything they can do to exact a tax or fee from people.

What state and are you certain the well meters apply to existing wells and not just new ones? My state tried unsuccessfully to pass similar legislation a few years ago but luckily it didn't fly. I should get a drilled well done before it happens. I have cistern for back-up to "city water". When city water was installed it was during a period of several summers of relative drought and it was a pain to pay someone to repeatedly haul water to fill the cistern.

Last edited by lifelongMOgal; 06-28-2010 at 07:21 PM..
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