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Old 03-03-2018, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
Isn't it interesting, too, that Redding is so sunny overall, even though it gets more rainy winter days than all of those locations? That's bc it's also the least likely to get tule fog in the winter, which makes up for the difference. In fact, I'd bet (but have to check) that Redding has the warmest record high temps in winter bc of its slight thermal belt location.

I'm so surprised to learn that Sacramento gets some amount of marine layer except on the rarest of occasions. Growing up in the northeastern part of Walnut Creek near the Mount Diablo Foothills and close to the Concord border, I would say we got no more than what you described, which just shows how similar the climates are. I had always assumed that Sacramento would have even less, but I know that Fairfield and Vacaville have more. We did tend to have shorter stretches of triple-digit days in summer and fewer freezing nights throughout the winter (in fact, my parents reported the first ones just within the last two weeks) so if anything, I would say it's a slightly improved version of a Sacramento climate. :-)
As in the warmest record high temps in winter in the Central Valley, and not California in general, right? Sorry, I'm not originally from up there; I'm just yet another SoCal (Riverside County) native.

Anyway, if the latter (the State in general), then Redding does not have the warmest record high temps in winter. I just compared Redding with my location/hometown (Indio), via Wikipedia, and Indio easily wins in terms of having about some of the warmest record high temps in winter in California.

And, yes, this is indeed interesting!
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Old 03-03-2018, 05:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Brandon Graves View Post
As in the warmest record high temps in winter in the Central Valley, and not California in general, right? Sorry, I'm not originally from up there; I'm just yet another SoCal (Riverside County) native.

Anyway, if the latter (the State in general), then Redding does not have the warmest record high temps in winter. I just compared Redding with my location/hometown (Indio), via Wikipedia, and Indio easily wins in terms of having about some of the warmest record high temps in winter in California.

And, yes, this is indeed interesting!
Yes, definitely just the Central Valley. Interior SoCal would by far have the warmest record highs (I've seen triple digits around Escondido once or twice in January). And now that I'm checking, I see Redding with winter records of 78 in Dec and 80 in Jan, compared to 72-73 in Sac for December and 76-79 for January (depending on location). Not as big a difference as I expected given that Redding does get 70f+ stretches during dry winter periods. I also just checked Fresno and Bakersfield, and Redding has Fresno beat, but Bakersfield has them all beat. Dec record: 87 / Jan record: 82. Quite a difference down there!

I wonder how Indio would compare with winter records compared to places like Temecula or Escondido, which I think benefit more from Santa Anas coming down the mountains and would have some of the hottest records.
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Old 03-03-2018, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
I wonder how Indio would compare with winter records compared to places like Temecula or Escondido, which I think benefit more from Santa Anas coming down the mountains and would have some of the hottest records.
Winter record high temps (Dec/Jan)

Indio: 96, 97

Escondido: 92, 91

Temecula: 89, 90

So, of the three SoCal cities, Temecula has the lowest, yet it is more inland than Escondido (of which it has very slightly higher winter record high temps than Temecula).
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Old 03-04-2018, 09:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Graves View Post
Winter record high temps (Dec/Jan)

Indio: 96, 97

Escondido: 92, 91

Temecula: 89, 90

So, of the three SoCal cities, Temecula has the lowest, yet it is more inland than Escondido (of which it has very slightly higher winter record high temps than Temecula).
Interesting! I do know that Temecula has a little more elevation and generally gets colder nights then most of Inland San Diego. That me be just enough to keep it from getting quite as hot as Escondido. I did not realize Indio could get that hot in the winter. I know that in Northern and central California, although the farthest Inland areas are definitely the hottest in summer, there not the hottest in winter. In the winter, it's usually Coastal Valleys roughly halfway between the beach and the Central Valley that tend to get that sweet spot. Places like Santa Rosa or, farther south, the Salinas Valley. Although the coastline from Santa Cruz on Southwards can tend to get some real warm spells in winter.
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Old 03-04-2018, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
1,377 posts, read 1,865,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
Interesting! I do know that Temecula has a little more elevation and generally gets colder nights then most of Inland San Diego. That me be just enough to keep it from getting quite as hot as Escondido. I did not realize Indio could get that hot in the winter. I know that in Northern and central California, although the farthest Inland areas are definitely the hottest in summer, there not the hottest in winter. In the winter, it's usually Coastal Valleys roughly halfway between the beach and the Central Valley that tend to get that sweet spot. Places like Santa Rosa or, farther south, the Salinas Valley. Although the coastline from Santa Cruz on Southwards can tend to get some real warm spells in winter.
Yeah, I somehow completely forgot all about the differences in elevation when comparing different cities/towns.

That's because Indio is located in the Coachella Valley (Greater Palm Springs Area), which is set within the Colorado Desert. It is low desert (AKA, "true desert"), so this means lower elevations near or at sea level (or, in a lot of cases, below sea level (e.g., the Imperial Valley, towns along the Salton Sea, etc.)), as opposed to high desert (the Antelope Valley, the Victor Valley, etc.), and some of the absolute HIGHEST record summer high temps (Death Valley takes the crown in this regard) in the U.S. and on the entire planet (temps exceeding 115-120°F are common; I imagine it's more common out here/there than in the Central Valley). Excluding Death Valley, the Coachella Valley, Imperial County (as a whole), and Blythe (and the Palo Verde Valley) boast some of the highest record winter temps, not only due to their location, but also their relatively lower elevations.

Have you been to the Coachella Valley before?

Last edited by Brandon Graves; 03-04-2018 at 06:29 PM..
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Old 03-04-2018, 05:32 PM
 
Location: 415->916->602
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Did the OP ever make the move?
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Old 03-05-2018, 12:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Graves View Post
Yeah, I somehow completely forgot all about the differences in elevation when comparing different cities/towns.

That's because Indio is located in the Coachella Valley (Greater Palm Springs Area), which is set within the Colorado Desert. It is low desert (AKA, "true desert"), so this means lower elevations near or at sea level (or, in a lot of cases, below sea level (e.g., the Imperial Valley, towns along the Salton Sea, etc.)), as opposed to high desert (the Antelope Valley, the Victor Valley, etc.), and some of the absolute HIGHEST record summer high temps (Death Valley takes the crown in this regard) in the U.S. and on the entire planet (temps exceeding 115-120°F are common; I imagine it's more common out here/there than in the Central Valley). Excluding Death Valley, the Coachella Valley, Imperial County (as a whole), and Blythe (and the Palo Verde Valley) boast some of the highest record winter temps, not only due to their location, but also their relatively lower elevations.

Have you been to the Coachella Valley before?
I've been to the Coachella Valley many times, but not in the past 8 or 9 years. I hear Palm Springs proper has undergone a lot of gentrification since then, as I used to find it a bit dull and old-fashioned. I don't know if we ever made it all the way south to Indio, but I believe that's where all those yummy dates are harvested (and date shakes are sold!). I do like the atmosphere of Palm Desert, because it reminds me of a miniature Scottsdale, and certainly the scenery is more reminiscent of Phoenix than coastal Southern California. A very beautiful place that deserves more of my attention. I still have the Mt. Jacinto tram and the desert museum to visit, for example.

Sadly, since moving to San Diego, we haven't gone terribly often, even though it's only two hours away. We just end up getting side tracked by other day trips that are closer to town, including Temecula or our local mountains. I really want to make another trip sometime soon.

My craziest Palm Springs story: when my husband and I were attending UC Berkeley as undergrads in the 90s during an epic rain season, we were getting tired of the rain and decided to make an overnight to Palm Springs. We drove 7.5 hours, checked into a hotel, had dinner outside on a patio on a balmy evening, and then returned the next afternoon (by which time the rains had reached the desert anyway). Lots of driving for less than a 24 hour stay!!
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Old 03-05-2018, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
I've been to the Coachella Valley many times, but not in the past 8 or 9 years. I hear Palm Springs proper has undergone a lot of gentrification since then, as I used to find it a bit dull and old-fashioned. I don't know if we ever made it all the way south to Indio, but I believe that's where all those yummy dates are harvested (and date shakes are sold!). I do like the atmosphere of Palm Desert, because it reminds me of a miniature Scottsdale, and certainly the scenery is more reminiscent of Phoenix than coastal Southern California. A very beautiful place that deserves more of my attention. I still have the Mt. Jacinto tram and the desert museum to visit, for example.
Yes, anywhere from Indio all the way down to the small rural towns of Mecca and Oasis (near the Salton Sea) is the primary agricultural area of the Coachella Valley. Between those two points, there is also Coachella, Thermal, and Vista Santa Rosa. You are correct that there are TONS of date tree farms out there. Lots of other crops are grown there, as well, such as citrus, carrots, artichokes, peppers, kohlrabi, melons, and so on. However, like most other agricultural regions in CA (and the nation), there is a LOT of poverty out there, too.

They aren't named "Thermal" and "Mecca" for nothing! The all-time record highest temps ever recorded in Thermal and Mecca are 125°F and 126°F (respectively)!

The eastern half of the Coachella Valley is kind of like the desert and hotter version of the Central Valley.

I personally love that area; there's just TONS of sunny weather and large vacant spaces of open land out there (though Indio and Coachella are undergoing some new development as of current)!

Fun fact: The Coachella Valley produces about 95% of the nation's date crop.
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Old 03-10-2018, 06:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Brandon Graves View Post
Yes, anywhere from Indio all the way down to the small rural towns of Mecca and Oasis (near the Salton Sea) is the primary agricultural area of the Coachella Valley. Between those two points, there is also Coachella, Thermal, and Vista Santa Rosa. You are correct that there are TONS of date tree farms out there. Lots of other crops are grown there, as well, such as citrus, carrots, artichokes, peppers, kohlrabi, melons, and so on. However, like most other agricultural regions in CA (and the nation), there is a LOT of poverty out there, too.

They aren't named "Thermal" and "Mecca" for nothing! The all-time record highest temps ever recorded in Thermal and Mecca are 125°F and 126°F (respectively)!

The eastern half of the Coachella Valley is kind of like the desert and hotter version of the Central Valley.

I personally love that area; there's just TONS of sunny weather and large vacant spaces of open land out there (though Indio and Coachella are undergoing some new development as of current)!

Fun fact: The Coachella Valley produces about 95% of the nation's date crop.
I'm almost surprised that it's not a hundred percent of the date crop. Where are the other 5% coming from? :-)
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Old 03-10-2018, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
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Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
I'm almost surprised that it's not a hundred percent of the date crop. Where are the other 5% coming from? :-)
Probably either down in Bard, the Imperial Valley, or somewhere in southwestern AZ. Those are just guesses, of course.
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