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Old 10-11-2018, 03:46 AM
 
4,433 posts, read 4,444,018 times
Reputation: 2056

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
For a metro area, Sac is like what, a top 20 market? Yet it's GDP rank is not in line with it's metro rank. LA is number 2, NYC number 1. Yet Sac can't hit 20?
OP, I think your best bet is with the State of California and you might want to look for non-IT jobs such as administrative jobs with the State, and once your in you could easily move into a IT job. Having IT skills is a plus even for state administrative jobs.

Sacramento median income is 10,000-15,000 more than LA on several lists.
Plus, the median sales price of a home: LA-$615,000; SAC-$315,000

In Sacramento you make more income than living in LA. And spend only half as much on a mortgage.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/...t-metro-areas/

32. Austin - 142.9 billion
33. Sacramento - 140.2 billion
34. Nashville - 134.9 billion
35. San Antonio - 126.9 billion
36. Las Vegas - 122.7 billion

Actually, it is quite impressive that Sacramento can power-up over 140 billion in GDP without having any Fortune 500 companies. That is a testament to the power of it's human capital. No large Metro in the country can bolster that.

You can still have a vibrant dynamic cultural environment without having Fortune 500 companies. Besides, the various Departments and Agencies of the State of California is Sacramento's equivalent of having multiple Fortune 500 companies. By the way, Centene, a Fortune 500 Co. just broke ground in Sacramento for their regional headquarters.

Sacramento has Seimans - they build all types of train cars and locomotives for the much of the country right here in Sacramento. Intel's Research and Development is in Folsom.

Last edited by Chimérique; 10-11-2018 at 04:01 AM..
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Monterey County, CA
5,129 posts, read 11,725,675 times
Reputation: 5324
Quote:
Originally Posted by JobHunter2018 View Post
Lord, I did a LOT of white box and black box QA back in the day, went from not knowing SQL to writing bug fixes for b2b shopping cart software in two days (granted this was back in the simple days of 1998-1999). I just assumed that they needed giant frak ton of certs and experience for that now. I consider myself very strong with software, and with learning new software. I'd love to get training in cloud technology, too. Pity I am out of money

Ironically places like UC Davis just need a bottom-floor newbie tech guy to install computers, and I know how to do that. But I need a birth certificate signed by four Gods to get in there. LOL.
Think of it this way, you are basically playing the odds. Given your prior experiences and education overlayed on the current market for IT workers where are the most jobs for someone like yourself? Where are companies having a harder time filling positions? You have to put yourself in their shoes as opposed to what you think you can do or want. Think customer first. What does the current IT customer really need today? As one who does hiring, recruiting and interviewing for our company, I would argue they are not jobs at the very bottom and that those jobs are actually much harder to come by. Those are not what most companies are looking for. If you have prior QA experience and combine that with some current software re-training I think you'll have better odds playing that angle than computer repair, especially in the long run. Computer repair guys are a dime a dozen with kids taking them apart and playing with them in their basements. But many newbies do not even understand what QA is, for example. That's where you can leverage some of your prior knowledge and experience.

Regarding being out of money, there are many free and very lost cost training options. Online classes from top universities are available, some for free. Take a beginning programming class in Java, for example. Many lower tech workers are afraid to even try that. But it will help you stand out from the crowd. Play with little programs at home, make your own website using newer tech just to learn how it works. What have you got lose in continuing to learn? That is the most important requirement for a successful IT professional = life long learning. Stay on top of new technology as it emerges. That is also the trait many employers will be looking for. Everyone needs a quick study who shows lots of initiative. Are you still teachable or more set in your ways with 'potentially' outdated approaches, etc..? What new things have you learned recently especially those which they are using, testing and deploying?

One of the biggest mistakes even newly graduated computer science (BSCS) majors make is to rely too heavily on their degree as if that was all they needed to learn. When in reality that is the furthest thing from the truth. All the degree does is meet 'one' of many minimum qualification standards just to get an interview. Having a degree is barely even the beginning of learning which must take place and quickly on the job. The best new grads are the ones who are already learning new stuff all the time on their own outside the classroom and then applying it. Those are the ones companies want to hire.

Derek

Last edited by MtnSurfer; 10-11-2018 at 10:34 AM..
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Greater Houston
4,514 posts, read 8,595,852 times
Reputation: 2086
Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
Sac lacks the vibrant, dynamic, private sector that would make it a regional center of commerce. No major banks hq there, no fortune 500 companies,etc

No. Just no. Sac is gub mint jobs, healthcare, logistics (warehouse and trucking) utilities, and service jobs. And a bunch of small companies or regional operations for large companies.

For a metro area, Sac is like what, a top 20 market? Yet it's GDP rank is not in line with it's metro rank. LA is number 2, NYC number 1. Yet Sac can't hit 20? SAD.

But Sac lacks the human capital to better itself!!!!
You do realize that it's relatively close to the Bay Area? A Palmdale to West L.A. commute is roughly 70 miles while Sacramento-S.F. commute is 80 miles. A tech worker could theoretically make the commute from Sacramento to S.F. or Stockton to Silicon Valley daily. There was a Stanford janitor making the news for his strenuous 2-3 hour commute from Stockton.

The Bay Area recently made news for record numbers of people fleeing due to long commutes, expensive housing, and high living costs. I bet the people who did not want to leave the region moved slightly inland to saner Sacramento.
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:22 PM
 
Location: la la land
27,160 posts, read 11,338,839 times
Reputation: 19271
Quote:
Originally Posted by JobHunter2018 View Post
Well I do want to work in IT - wouldn't Costco or police dispatching mean I never get back into that industry? I will look into Kinko's.

My skills are in system and network administration, computer repair and software installation. I've been doing it since the 1990s.
I mentioned those because they are decent jobs that you can get without industry experience. I don't know if you actually need a job, if you don't then by all means hold out for one that is in your field. But, a few words of advice. My husband retired as a senior network engineer from a Fortune 500 company in Nevada. When he started working there, they had two full time PC support techs. Four years ago when my husband retired they had none, they had a contract with HP for PC's and didn't even bother fixing them, they just bought new ones from HP. The network engineers took over the remaining hardware tasks like Sally needs a new keyboard, or Matt in graphics is whining about his monitor being too small. PC support isn't what it was 20 years ago and I don't see anything turning that around in the future, it's brutal for guys like yourself who pursued a career in the field but that's the reality.
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:32 PM
 
Location: la la land
27,160 posts, read 11,338,839 times
Reputation: 19271
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
You do realize that it's relatively close to the Bay Area? A Palmdale to West L.A. commute is roughly 70 miles while Sacramento-S.F. commute is 80 miles. A tech worker could theoretically make the commute from Sacramento to S.F. or Stockton to Silicon Valley daily. There was a Stanford janitor making the news for his strenuous 2-3 hour commute from Stockton.

The Bay Area recently made news for record numbers of people fleeing due to long commutes, expensive housing, and high living costs. I bet the people who did not want to leave the region moved slightly inland to saner Sacramento.
Yep, lots of people are fleeing the bay area for Sacramento. I am not sure why people go out of their way to talk smack about Sacramento, personally I love it here.

Why Bay Area Residents Are Flooding to Sacramento Sacramento Real Estate

https://www.mercurynews.com/2017/11/...in-sacramento/
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Monterey County, CA
5,129 posts, read 11,725,675 times
Reputation: 5324
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
I mentioned those because they are decent jobs that you can get without industry experience. I don't know if you actually need a job, if you don't then by all means hold out for one that is in your field. But, a few words of advice. My husband retired as a senior network engineer from a Fortune 500 company in Nevada. When he started working there, they had two full time PC support techs. Four years ago when my husband retired they had none, they had a contract with HP for PC's and didn't even bother fixing them, they just bought new ones from HP. The network engineers took over the remaining hardware tasks like Sally needs a new keyboard, or Matt in graphics is whining about his monitor being too small. PC support isn't what it was 20 years ago and I don't see anything turning that around in the future, it's brutal for guys like yourself who pursued a career in the field but that's the reality.
That is the same things I've seen which is reflective of the industry at large. Each year there are fewer jobs like that, not more or even the same. It also makes more sense from a business perspective. Now that many/most are moving to cloud solutions even more than when your husband retired the goal is to not have to do any tech support on premise. Sure, Sally's PC monitor will still go out on occasion. But they will simply notify the vendor who they are leasing it from to get another one and the same with her laptop/PC.

For the OP, the answer to the original question is no, Sacramento isn't a DEAD ZONE for tech jobs. Rather, tech jobs have evolved over the past 20 years and are much different than they were back in the day. The industry overall has changed quite a bit with some jobs being phased out in favor of newer, emerging positions which are now more in demand. The real world example I gave was Cloud Systems Administrator. That is something I'm helping to hire for soon. And the admin that just left is in high demand.

After 4 years of looking and not finding anything, one has to question the approach being taken. Is this still really the best course of action? Or could there be a better way to find long term employment even if that looks different than originally envisioned?

Derek
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Old 10-11-2018, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, Placerville
2,442 posts, read 4,872,747 times
Reputation: 2111
Quote:
Originally Posted by MtnSurfer View Post
Think of it this way, you are basically playing the odds. Given your prior experiences and education overlayed on the current market for IT workers where are the most jobs for someone like yourself? Where are companies having a harder time filling positions? You have to put yourself in their shoes as opposed to what you think you can do or want. Think customer first. What does the current IT customer really need today? As one who does hiring, recruiting and interviewing for our company, I would argue they are not jobs at the very bottom and that those jobs are actually much harder to come by. Those are not what most companies are looking for. If you have prior QA experience and combine that with some current software re-training I think you'll have better odds playing that angle than computer repair, especially in the long run. Computer repair guys are a dime a dozen with kids taking them apart and playing with them in their basements. But many newbies do not even understand what QA is, for example. That's where you can leverage some of your prior knowledge and experience.

Regarding being out of money, there are many free and very lost cost training options. Online classes from top universities are available, some for free. Take a beginning programming class in Java, for example. Many lower tech workers are afraid to even try that. But it will help you stand out from the crowd. Play with little programs at home, make your own website using newer tech just to learn how it works. What have you got lose in continuing to learn? That is the most important requirement for a successful IT professional = life long learning. Stay on top of new technology as it emerges. That is also the trait many employers will be looking for. Everyone needs a quick study who shows lots of initiative. Are you still teachable or more set in your ways with 'potentially' outdated approaches, etc..? What new things have you learned recently especially those which they are using, testing and deploying?

One of the biggest mistakes even newly graduated computer science (BSCS) majors make is to rely too heavily on their degree as if that was all they needed to learn. When in reality that is the furthest thing from the truth. All the degree does is meet 'one' of many minimum qualification standards just to get an interview. Having a degree is barely even the beginning of learning which must take place and quickly on the job. The best new grads are the ones who are already learning new stuff all the time on their own outside the classroom and then applying it. Those are the ones companies want to hire.

Derek
QA isn't a skill that is in much demand in Sacramento. The only job openings for that role I've seen here are at Intel and some robotics company in Rocklin. The position at Intel is a contract and non-permanent one at that.

Actual computer repair has never been in much demand outside of computer stores. The job the OP should be looking for is help desk or desktop support. Desktop support techs often do warranty repairs on computers at a company that are in the current hardware life cycle, and thus, under warranty. So, while most of a desktop support techs job will involve other things, they will often add some extra memory or replace a hard drive that fails.

Supposedly, help desk and desktop support techs are in such demand that employers can't fill those positions. My experience has been that nobody will hire me due to an employment gap. When employers say they can't fill those positions, but are unwilling to hire candidates with employment gaps, that tells me there is a huge disconnect with reality on the employer's end.
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Old 10-12-2018, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Sacramento County
15 posts, read 4,065 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC6ZLV View Post
QA isn't a skill that is in much demand in Sacramento. The only job openings for that role I've seen here are at Intel and some robotics company in Rocklin. The position at Intel is a contract and non-permanent one at that.

Actual computer repair has never been in much demand outside of computer stores. The job the OP should be looking for is help desk or desktop support. Desktop support techs often do warranty repairs on computers at a company that are in the current hardware life cycle, and thus, under warranty. So, while most of a desktop support techs job will involve other things, they will often add some extra memory or replace a hard drive that fails.

Supposedly, help desk and desktop support techs are in such demand that employers can't fill those positions. My experience has been that nobody will hire me due to an employment gap. When employers say they can't fill those positions, but are unwilling to hire candidates with employment gaps, that tells me there is a huge disconnect with reality on the employer's end.
Then my employment gap is what's killing me in my search even for help desk / support jobs. Is it basically insurmountable? If so I'm done in tech unless I can score higher in my State Government eligibility tests - which automatically downgrade me severely due to my lack of recent experience.

Anyone have experience with Hello Tech?
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Old 10-12-2018, 10:39 AM
 
Location: la la land
27,160 posts, read 11,338,839 times
Reputation: 19271
Quote:
Originally Posted by JobHunter2018 View Post
Then my employment gap is what's killing me in my search even for help desk / support jobs. Is it basically insurmountable? If so I'm done in tech unless I can score higher in my State Government eligibility tests - which automatically downgrade me severely due to my lack of recent experience.

Anyone have experience with Hello Tech?
The state is somewhat unique in the way that they weight experience. Try city and county jobs instead. This site is pretty good for checking municipal and county job openings: https://www.calopps.org/

Apply for everything with help desk or IT support in the title https://www.indeed.com/jobs?q=help+d...o+County%2C+CA
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Old 10-12-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Monterey County, CA
5,129 posts, read 11,725,675 times
Reputation: 5324
Quote:
Originally Posted by JobHunter2018 View Post
Then my employment gap is what's killing me in my search even for help desk / support jobs. Is it basically insurmountable? If so I'm done in tech unless I can score higher in my State Government eligibility tests - which automatically downgrade me severely due to my lack of recent experience.

Anyone have experience with Hello Tech?
Your biggest problem is lack of current experience. So I would say why not try Hello Tech? It gets you paid experience, right? I doubt you'll find anyone on the forum with experience working for them. But you can check the reviews from those who do here: https://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/He...s-E1410121.htm

If you start with them that could potentially lead to other opportunities. Heck, any temp service would be good just to get back into the workforce. If current experience is critical, which I think it is, that is what you need to get in any shape or form you can find it! Even if temporary, low pay, etc... it is still experience.

Otherwise, it could be time to change career directions. But most other careers are going to want some experience as well. You just have to find a way to get off the ground after the long break.

Derek
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