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Old 02-25-2014, 11:04 PM
 
9,133 posts, read 9,217,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMitch View Post
Thanks for all the replies, they are extremely helpful. I am still a little confused as to what the inversion is and how concerned I should be. Obviously I do not want to put my families health at risk, but do not want to overreact either. I am gathering that Provo area and south is better for being closer to lakes, but is the school / health / conveniences jeopardized as I go south? I want where I choose to be a last move for us..... thats why I have so many questions trying to figure out the best place to start looking. Is Provo area better than Ogen as an example? Thanks again.
Unless you are LDS, I would not seriously consider moving anywhere in the Utah County area. Provo, of course, is is the county seat of Utah County.

This topic has been discussed several times here and while there are dissenters, the consensus is that its a poor location for someone from out of state unfamiliar with the LDS (Mormon) culture. The county is approximately 80% LDS. If you want the reasons why, you can look of the multitude of threads on this topic. The simple explanation is the lack of diversity in the county can be tough on people from outside the state. More than one person has written here expressing regret over this choice.

Ogden, would be a better choice. Its a more diverse area. I could particularly recommend some of its suburbs such as Roy, South Ogden, North Ogden, Pleasant View, or Plain City.
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Old 02-27-2014, 10:18 PM
 
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We were seriously considering the Lindon area. So if I understand correctly, if we are not LDS, we would not be welcome there and our kids would be put off? The reason I want to be south is because my Wife's family lives in California and it would be a bit closer, plus I understand the inversion is better the further south you go. But if being non-LDS would make us some kind of outcast, then I guess I would not consider it. This kind of surprises me, but then I am not very educated on Utah. We are not LDS, but we respect all people and would expect the same respect. Can you be more specific on the problems we would encounter? Thank you, it is much appreciated.
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Old 02-28-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: SLC, UT
1,571 posts, read 2,275,426 times
Reputation: 3848
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMitch View Post
We were seriously considering the Lindon area. So if I understand correctly, if we are not LDS, we would not be welcome there and our kids would be put off? The reason I want to be south is because my Wife's family lives in California and it would be a bit closer, plus I understand the inversion is better the further south you go. But if being non-LDS would make us some kind of outcast, then I guess I would not consider it. This kind of surprises me, but then I am not very educated on Utah. We are not LDS, but we respect all people and would expect the same respect. Can you be more specific on the problems we would encounter? Thank you, it is much appreciated.
It's not that you'll be an outcast, it's that you won't find it easy to make friends at all. Mormons are very socially busy with their church. There could be 3-4 (or more) church activities per week. So when you pile it all together - work obligations, family obligations, church obligations, you end up with no time left for making friends outside of church. Besides which, if you spend time with people from your church constantly, then those people will be your friends, so why go out of your way to make new friends when you already have a ton of them who you see multiple times per week? Or in other words, people may be outwardly friendly to you (waving hello, exchanging a few quick pleasantries), but forming deeper relationships will be very difficult.

For your kids, depending on how young they are, it may be a little easier, because they can go through school with the other non-Mormons, making friends with them. For adults or teenagers, it will be more difficult though, because all those non-Mormons formed relationships earlier in life, and may not be totally open to allowing someone new in the group. Note that Scout groups will probably be almost 100% Mormon and will likely meet at the Mormon church, so even groups that seem like they're separate from church, may not be.

I've written before in a couple other threads how there are some Mormons who won't let their kids play with non-Mormons. It's happened to my cousin - she was born and raised here, but was never Mormon. She was great in one neighborhood (a suburb of SLC), but moved two blocks away and was told by both of her neighbors that their kids could never play with hers because her kids aren't Mormon. I know other people have posted, saying they had a hard time in some neighborhoods, while having an easier time in other neighborhoods. However, I think for the most part, people will be polite and friendly to you - it's just going beyond that to actual friendship that will be the tough one.

Honestly, my recommendation would be to NOT BUY right away. Rent a house for a year. Get your lay of the land. See if your family fits into that neighborhood. Do your best to get out there and socialize. If your kids are old enough, sign them up for after school activities, especially activities that aren't at the school (so you meet other people from other neighborhoods and can gauge where you may fit in best). Ask around, and see if there's a book group or other kind of group that you and your spouse can join. Really be proactive in meeting people, so after a year or so, you'll have a better idea of what specific neighborhood and city you want to live in.

Plenty of people do well here who aren't Mormon, so don't be super discouraged. But the culture is dominated by the Mormon religion (which is just called "The Church" here - not "my church" or "the Mormon church"). Utah County is such, that even a lot of Mormons don't like living there, because it's even a little "too Mormon" for them.

But again, it all depends on the person, the family, your circumstances, and each individual neighborhood. So don't be put off, but do your homework, and really, I think it would be best to rent at first.
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Old 02-28-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,813 posts, read 55,771,747 times
Reputation: 18989
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisfitBanana View Post
It's not that you'll be an outcast, it's that you won't find it easy to make friends at all. Mormons are very socially busy with their church. There could be 3-4 (or more) church activities per week. So when you pile it all together - work obligations, family obligations, church obligations, you end up with no time left for making friends outside of church. Besides which, if you spend time with people from your church constantly, then those people will be your friends, so why go out of your way to make new friends when you already have a ton of them who you see multiple times per week? Or in other words, people may be outwardly friendly to you (waving hello, exchanging a few quick pleasantries), but forming deeper relationships will be very difficult.

For your kids, depending on how young they are, it may be a little easier, because they can go through school with the other non-Mormons, making friends with them. For adults or teenagers, it will be more difficult though, because all those non-Mormons formed relationships earlier in life, and may not be totally open to allowing someone new in the group. Note that Scout groups will probably be almost 100% Mormon and will likely meet at the Mormon church, so even groups that seem like they're separate from church, may not be.

I've written before in a couple other threads how there are some Mormons who won't let their kids play with non-Mormons. It's happened to my cousin - she was born and raised here, but was never Mormon. She was great in one neighborhood (a suburb of SLC), but moved two blocks away and was told by both of her neighbors that their kids could never play with hers because her kids aren't Mormon. I know other people have posted, saying they had a hard time in some neighborhoods, while having an easier time in other neighborhoods. However, I think for the most part, people will be polite and friendly to you - it's just going beyond that to actual friendship that will be the tough one.

Honestly, my recommendation would be to NOT BUY right away. Rent a house for a year. Get your lay of the land. See if your family fits into that neighborhood. Do your best to get out there and socialize. If your kids are old enough, sign them up for after school activities, especially activities that aren't at the school (so you meet other people from other neighborhoods and can gauge where you may fit in best). Ask around, and see if there's a book group or other kind of group that you and your spouse can join. Really be proactive in meeting people, so after a year or so, you'll have a better idea of what specific neighborhood and city you want to live in.

Plenty of people do well here who aren't Mormon, so don't be super discouraged. But the culture is dominated by the Mormon religion (which is just called "The Church" here - not "my church" or "the Mormon church"). Utah County is such, that even a lot of Mormons don't like living there, because it's even a little "too Mormon" for them.

But again, it all depends on the person, the family, your circumstances, and each individual neighborhood. So don't be put off, but do your homework, and really, I think it would be best to rent at first.
Excellent advice!
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Old 02-28-2014, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Utah
5,000 posts, read 14,431,392 times
Reputation: 4975
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisfitBanana View Post
It's not that you'll be an outcast, it's that you won't find it easy to make friends at all. Mormons are very socially busy with their church. There could be 3-4 (or more) church activities per week. So when you pile it all together - work obligations, family obligations, church obligations, you end up with no time left for making friends outside of church. Besides which, if you spend time with people from your church constantly, then those people will be your friends, so why go out of your way to make new friends when you already have a ton of them who you see multiple times per week? Or in other words, people may be outwardly friendly to you (waving hello, exchanging a few quick pleasantries), but forming deeper relationships will be very difficult.

For your kids, depending on how young they are, it may be a little easier, because they can go through school with the other non-Mormons, making friends with them. For adults or teenagers, it will be more difficult though, because all those non-Mormons formed relationships earlier in life, and may not be totally open to allowing someone new in the group. Note that Scout groups will probably be almost 100% Mormon and will likely meet at the Mormon church, so even groups that seem like they're separate from church, may not be.

I've written before in a couple other threads how there are some Mormons who won't let their kids play with non-Mormons. It's happened to my cousin - she was born and raised here, but was never Mormon. She was great in one neighborhood (a suburb of SLC), but moved two blocks away and was told by both of her neighbors that their kids could never play with hers because her kids aren't Mormon. I know other people have posted, saying they had a hard time in some neighborhoods, while having an easier time in other neighborhoods. However, I think for the most part, people will be polite and friendly to you - it's just going beyond that to actual friendship that will be the tough one.

Honestly, my recommendation would be to NOT BUY right away. Rent a house for a year. Get your lay of the land. See if your family fits into that neighborhood. Do your best to get out there and socialize. If your kids are old enough, sign them up for after school activities, especially activities that aren't at the school (so you meet other people from other neighborhoods and can gauge where you may fit in best). Ask around, and see if there's a book group or other kind of group that you and your spouse can join. Really be proactive in meeting people, so after a year or so, you'll have a better idea of what specific neighborhood and city you want to live in.

Plenty of people do well here who aren't Mormon, so don't be super discouraged. But the culture is dominated by the Mormon religion (which is just called "The Church" here - not "my church" or "the Mormon church"). Utah County is such, that even a lot of Mormons don't like living there, because it's even a little "too Mormon" for them.

But again, it all depends on the person, the family, your circumstances, and each individual neighborhood. So don't be put off, but do your homework, and really, I think it would be best to rent at first.
"Utah County is such, that even a lot of Mormons don't like living there, because it's even a little "too Mormon" for them." I've heard this directly from Mormons myself. I'm a native Utahan, and spent my first 21 years in Orem. I didn't fit in. I'm not LDS.

I think over the years, there has been a slight increase in religious diversity in Utah. Don't have any numbers to back that up, just from personal experiences and stories I've heard. Most of my family still lives in Utah county....some are LDS, some aren't.

I agree with SouthernBelle, Misfit gave you great advice.
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Old 02-28-2014, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Central City, SLC
763 posts, read 1,673,885 times
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And the inversion is NOT better further south. On many "air action days" this year, Utah County's PM2.5 levels were considerably higher than Salt Lake County's.
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Old 02-28-2014, 05:08 PM
 
13 posts, read 18,615 times
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Is it possible to fit in any place in Utah or are you saying it is tough to fit in anywhere and basically impossible in Utah County? Sorry for all the questions that likely seem obvious to you but I need to try to fully understand. I like how Utah looks on paper as far as crime and quality of life.
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:46 PM
 
Location: The other side of the mountain
2,447 posts, read 5,896,679 times
Reputation: 1185
I am not LDS and my family has fit into UT just fine. Granted, we don't live in UT County either. There are some more diverse areas that would probably suit you better. As far as inversion goes, unless you are living outside of a valley (Park City, Mountain Green, Heber, Midway) you are going to get the inversion. It is just the geography of the land.
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Old 02-28-2014, 07:03 PM
 
13 posts, read 18,615 times
Reputation: 10
Thanks for the reply, where do you live? Is the inversion something I need to be concerned about? I still am not clear on it. I can't imagine families living there if it puts their children a serious risk ?
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Old 02-28-2014, 07:11 PM
 
Location: The other side of the mountain
2,447 posts, read 5,896,679 times
Reputation: 1185
I live in Tooele County. It is west of Salt Lake. I have a husband and a daughter who both have asthma and they haven't had problems with the inversion. Mostly very young children, elderly people and people with compromised immune systems are advised to stay indoors when the inversion gets too bad. The biggest issue I have with it, is that it is depressing. Days and days of ice foggy, dreary, cold days can wear on you. Luckily it isn't ALL winter and it usually lasts a few days then a storm comes through and cleans the air out. It can, and has, lasted longer than a few days, but it doesn't last months. Liken it to the LA smog..only in the winter.
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