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Old 04-23-2014, 01:52 PM
 
4 posts, read 13,010 times
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Hello!

We just moved to the SLC area a few days ago from the east coast and are trying to get our bearings. We're looking to buy a house in the next couple of months and since we don't know the area we're a bit lost. We saw a rental house in Daybreak and were really impressed with the community amenities, safety and cleanliness. We've heard some great things about the area but we've also heard some horror stories about home builders doing shoddy work leading to major issues, problems with the HOA, being snubbed for not being Mormon etc. We tried to find a list of builders in Daybreak so we could research which builders were well reviewed but we couldn't find a list anywhere. If you live in Daybreak, could you tell us what you love/hate about it and which builders do quality work?

For what it's worth, we're looking to spend about $250k on a 3+ bed, 2+ bath single family home, preferably with a finished basement or additional bedrooms in a clean, family friendly neighborhood with good schools. We'd like to be close to shops and parks but it's not a must, a garage is a must however and we don't want a fixer-upper. My dream home would be open concept, full of light, modern without a ton of stairs, a moderately sized yard without a ton of gardening to deal with and no big trees near the house to wreck the foundation. We don't want to be further north than Salt Lake and no further south than Draper. We're considering homes in Draper, Sandy, Daybreak, Cottonwood Heights, Sugarhouse, Holladay, West Jordan, South Jordan, Taylorsville etc. We have a realtor and will be looking at homes as soon as our mortgage loan is completed.

Any advice is greatly appreciated! Thank you!
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Old 04-28-2014, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,772 posts, read 1,767,296 times
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I've not lived in Daybreak, but I've visited and know a couple things about it so I'll give this a shot.

Daybreak is nice and very suburban. It's not the city, in fact it's quite a drive to get to the city. I work in the city and have a couple coworkers who live there and they don't even drive to work because it's too far. They take the train (Trax) and it's a longish train ride (over an hour)

However if that doesn't bother you then it's a great place. It has its own commercial developments, lots of homes and condos and it has a nice view. Parts of the development are built on a reclaimed mine waste site, but I don't believe this is as bad of a thing as some make it out to be.

I have heard complaints about the HOA (it's expensive and doesn't offer much) and the few times I've been out there I would not describe the place as diverse. I want to be as PC as possible, so you translate that however you like. Just know that in Utah there are places where your beliefs really define how the community views you and Daybreak does strike me as one of those places.

I see you named a lot of other suburbs on there and left mine out (but that doesn't surprise me.. because someone probably once told you West Valley is the ghetto, it isn't, there are $500,000+ homes being built up the street from me). Highbury may be out of your price range, but there are lots of 1990's/2000's homes in the neighborhood (3100 S/5600 W) of the development for $200k-300k. Your commute to downtown is about 20 minutes at rush hour and 12 minutes in zero traffic. Yards will also be larger than you'll find in Daybreak. It's more diverse and statistically speaking crime rates are lower than they are in Salt Lake (Sugar House), South Salt Lake, Murray or Taylorsville. They're higher than Sandy and South Jordan, but if you avoid the east side of West Valley it's nice. Essentially the same as West Jordan, just closer to downtown and maybe a little more difficult for a racist person to happily live in.

I used to live in Sugar House. I liked it a lot, though most of the homes are going to be over $250k and built in 1960 or before. A lot of them have been updated, but those are going to be $400k+. Sugar House is rather expensive, but the location is great as its just as close to downtown and there are lots of local "hipster" type shops. If I made about 120k a year I'd move there, but as a 28 year old cube-engineer (Dilbert) that's not happening... yet...

Sandy and Draper are nice. You can find homes for 200-250k there, but they won't be modern open concepts, full of light. They'll probably be more of a split entry starter home built in the late 80's/early 90's. Yards will be decent sized and your neighbors will mostly be the same as if you lived in Daybreak. The development is old enough that all basements should be finished at this point.

Cottonwood Heights and Holladay you aren't going to find what you want for that price. You could probably find a townhome there with 3BR/2BA and a decent yard for 250k, but single family homes, unlikely.

Anyway, I hope some of what I said is helpful. Finding a realtor (or two or three) who know the areas might be worth your while. And don't make assumptions that "this town is good, this town is bad" because in reality that isn't the case. There are bad areas, and most of them are going to be along I-15 and I-215, but if you get a mile or so away from the interstates there aren't really any more bad parts in the whole valley. Also, if having lots of like-minded neighbors doesn't bother you I'd consider Bountiful. It's very close to downtown and may get you in your price range, though homes are going to be mostly older, unless you move up the mountain and then you move out of your price range.

Best of luck!
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Old 04-28-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: A Place With REAL People
2,339 posts, read 5,111,303 times
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I know a few folks that bought homes early on at Daybreak. They informed me that they had to sign paperwork that indicated it was ill advised to ever grow anything on property there that was considered for consumption. While Kennecott made "some" efforts to clean up the tailings and leftover toxins of the years gone buy that settled that land, they are not taking responsibility for anything that happens from this point on. So indeed I would recommend a highly efficient water filtration system and not planting edible plants or trees on one's property there to be sure. Also the South Jordan Water District elected to add flouride to the water. If you do even rudimentary research you will find that flouride is a known "neurotoxin" and it has been widely recognized for years as a harbinger for diseases of the brain and organs. Adolph Hitler used it added in water provided to the concentration camp residents, and much experimentation has been done on it over the year confirming the damning evidence. How in the heck the ADA seems to find it beneficial to prevent cavities in small children is beyond me. Even my dentist (a rare one who has some brains) won't allow it's use in HIS office. Many still do. Just a head up.
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Old 04-28-2014, 01:59 PM
 
Location: The other side of the mountain
2,447 posts, read 5,912,916 times
Reputation: 1185
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcisive View Post
If you do even rudimentary research you will find that flouride is a known "neurotoxin" and it has been widely recognized for years as a harbinger for diseases of the brain and organs. Adolph Hitler used it added in water provided to the concentration camp residents, and much experimentation has been done on it over the year confirming the damning evidence. How in the heck the ADA seems to find it beneficial to prevent cavities in small children is beyond me. Even my dentist (a rare one who has some brains) won't allow it's use in HIS office. Many still do. Just a head up.
My DH, who hauls chemicals and has worked in the industry for many years, agrees. He said that flouride is some nasty nasty stuff. Luckily is not added to our water supply and I refuse to let my children have treatments at the dentist. They also give flouride treatments once a week at their elementary schools (when they were that age). I refused that, too!
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Old 04-28-2014, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,772 posts, read 1,767,296 times
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I have experience working as both a hydrologist and a geologist, so let me address these issues with some first-hand knowledge.

Flouride is a halogen and occurs in salt compounds that exhibit toxicity. It is most commonly introduced to water sources as Sodium Flouride (NaF).

Water which has been treated with NaF has a NaF density of roughly 0.7-1.2 mg/L. The average person consumes roughly 3L of water per day. This equates to 2.1 to 3.6 mg of sodium fluoride intake per day.

The LD50 (the lethal dose that would kill 50% of the population to intake) is 52–200 mg per kg in rats. Using the low end of that scale and assuming a 5 kg human baby that would be 260 mg of sodium flouride one would need to ingest before metabolizing it. The baby would have to drink 216 liters (57 gallons) of water to reach the lethal dose. Let's say the lethal dose for some is 25% of the LD50. That is over 14.25 gallons, that your ultra-flouride-sensitive baby would need to drink to actually be harmed from NaF treatment of water and realistically if your newborn ingests 14 gallons of water in a day (or a week even) it's going to have far bigger issues than too much sodium fluoride. (A 150 lbs adult would need to ingest 930 gallons of water to reach the LD50).

Now I don't work for the government. I don't care if there is fluoride in the water. I don't really even care if anything I said changes your opinion on the South Jordan water district. I do however feel the need to hopefully set you straight about the toxicity of fluoride so maybe you can sleep better and so this person asking about living in Daybreak doesn't get all freaked out of the potential voodoo chemicals in their water.

So... those are the numbers... they say very clearly that low concentrations of sodium fluoride in water won't hurt you.

Additionally Daybreak was not built on tailings ponds. The Kennecott tailings ponds are out between Stansbury Park and Magna. I'm sure you've seen them. It was built on a reclaimed mine waste site.

These are different things. Tailings are what is left over of chemical processing that separates the ore from the rock. I wouldn't want to live on these. Mine waste is frequently in mining called overburden. This is the stuff that gets taken out and set aside because there is no ore in it. It is not poison, it's just rock. It's just some stuff that was taken out and set aside so the miners could get at the ore. No processing, no treatment, nothing. That is what Daybreak is built on. I wouldn't really mind living on these.
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Old 04-28-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Central City, SLC
763 posts, read 1,680,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcisive View Post
Also the South Jordan Water District elected to add flouride to the water. If you do even rudimentary research you will find that flouride is a known "neurotoxin" and it has been widely recognized for years as a harbinger for diseases of the brain and organs. Adolph Hitler used it added in water provided to the concentration camp residents, and much experimentation has been done on it over the year confirming the damning evidence. How in the heck the ADA seems to find it beneficial to prevent cavities in small children is beyond me. Even my dentist (a rare one who has some brains) won't allow it's use in HIS office. Many still do. Just a head up.
The South Jordan Water District made no such election; the Salt Lake County Board of Health, following the advice of every professional dental health organization in the country, passed a health regulation that required all public water systems over a certain size to add the CDC-recommended amount of fluoride to their culinary water. In Salt Lake County, that means all municipal water systems except White City and Holladay City have fluoridated water.

Further, the ADA does NOT think fluoride prevents cavities in small children; because fluoride strengthens teeth as they are forming---not once they've formed---it merely helps prevent future cavities in adulthood. We adults get to drink small amounts of fluoride simply because it (like so many things in this state) is good "for the children."

Fluoride is only a neurotoxin at certain levels just like aluminum, aspartame, and many, many other elements. Hell, even vitamin A is toxic at certain levels. At the levels present in drinking water, there are NO health risks associated with fluoride; in fact, the level of fluoride naturally present in many spring waters (that anti-fluoride advocates sometimes buy to avoid fluoride!) is higher than what's in public water systems.

Apology for the off-topic information, but dcisive's inflammatory ("Hitler liked fluoride!"---really?!) claims needed a counter-argument. Believe whatever you want, but I highly doubt dcisive has more knowledge about the effects of fluoride than the many organizations and university researchers who've spent 20+ years researching its effects.

Last edited by CCSLC; 04-28-2014 at 04:21 PM..
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Old 04-28-2014, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Central City, SLC
763 posts, read 1,680,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaytidid View Post
Luckily is not added to our water supply and I refuse to let my children have treatments at the dentist. They also give flouride treatments once a week at their elementary schools (when they were that age). I refused that, too!
You do know that Stansbury Park Improvement District's water has naturally occurring fluoride (0.1 mg/L), right? It's not added to your water supply to optimal CDC levels, but your children were getting some fluoridation anyway.
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Old 04-28-2014, 08:50 PM
 
Location: A Place With REAL People
2,339 posts, read 5,111,303 times
Reputation: 2337
It doesn't surprise me in the least there have been responses such as these. Most of America is "drinking the KoolAid" so to speak regarding anything our government and agencies recommend. Last I checked I'm no ostrich....it's a choice......
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Old 04-28-2014, 09:17 PM
 
Location: The other side of the mountain
2,447 posts, read 5,912,916 times
Reputation: 1185
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCSLC View Post
You do know that Stansbury Park Improvement District's water has naturally occurring fluoride (0.1 mg/L), right? It's not added to your water supply to optimal CDC levels, but your children were getting some fluoridation anyway.
Yes, I did know that. We drink it filtered anyway.
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Old 04-28-2014, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Central City, SLC
763 posts, read 1,680,646 times
Reputation: 774
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcisive View Post
It doesn't surprise me in the least there have been responses such as these. Most of America is "drinking the KoolAid" so to speak regarding anything our government and agencies recommend. Last I checked I'm no ostrich....it's a choice......
Right. Because universities conducting peer-reviewed, unsponsored scientific research are peddling Kool-Aid and have an agenda.

You probably still believe the earth is flat, too, since it looks that way to you. Scientific studies be damned! The government says the earth is round, but YOU'VE observed it as flat (you're looking around, after all, not an ostrich in the sand!), so it MUST be flat.

Until you have a PhD in chemistry (or any scientific field, actually), your non-ostrich opinion (since that's what it is: an opinion completely without facts supporting it) is worth absolutely what we've all paid for it.
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