U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Utah > Salt Lake City area
 [Register]
Salt Lake City area Salt Lake County - Davis County - Weber County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-24-2017, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,787 posts, read 2,421,704 times
Reputation: 3594

Advertisements

This something I did on another metro's thread and it ended up being a fun and well discussed thread, so I thought I'd do it here too! So.. we often debate where the "best" place to live is. The problem here is that everyone thinks their town is the best (I know I do) and often comparing two completely different but equally great suburbs is impossible, so.. I broke it down into 12 categories. Also, I know they all say "city" but that can mean anything. It can be the city, a suburb, a village, a charter township.. whatever.., just have some fun Okay, copy/paste/go:
  • Best city for young singles:
  • Best city for young families:
  • Best city for older families:
  • Best city for retirees:
  • Most improved city since 2000:
  • Most improvable, promising city going forward:
  • Most desirable "Affordable" city:
  • Most Down-to-Earth "high-income" city:
  • Best inner-ring suburb:
  • Best outer-ring suburb:
  • Best exurb:
  • Best "core" city (Salt Lake City, Provo, or Ogden):

Notes/Rules:
  • This is purely subjective, I'm sure it'll create some disagreements, but understand that another's opinion is not wrong, it's just different from your own, so try to respect that.
  • Let's make a rule that, with the exception of the last one, you can't use the same city twice. I know that otherwise there are certain posters (myself included) who would list their home town 4 times, (as I just tried to do, before adding this note)
  • Let's call an "affordable" city a place where a family of 4 can reasonably own a house earning only 40k, assuming responsible budgeting.
  • Let's call a "high-income" city a place where a typical family of 4 within the city earns over 100k.
  • Let's define an "inner-ring" suburb anything that borders a "Core City" or was an established part of the metro before the Californian invasion of the 70s/80s.
  • And an "outer-ring" suburb is generally a commuter suburb that grew up in the 90s, and on.
  • And "exurbs" are places beyond what we typically think of the metro, but are still heavily influenced by Salt Lake and would likely not exist without the city's economic anchor. Note: This means St. George and Logan are not exurbs.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-24-2017, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,787 posts, read 2,421,704 times
Reputation: 3594
Aaand.. sorry for the double-post, but I want to throw my input in before I go to bed and I wanted to give an easy copy/paste in the Original Post.

Best city for young singles: Salt Lake City - In my opinion, SLC is hands down the best and possibly only good place to live as a young single person in the metro area. Between Sugar House, The Avenues, Liberty Wells.. there is no shortage of great neighborhoods in the city for a young single person to take up and call home.
Best city for young families: Bountiful - I grew up here and I have a lot of good memories of Bountiful. There are good schools, there are lots of kids, and it's relatively affordable when compared with other "niceish" parts of the metro.
Best city for older families: Cottonwood Heights - It's a bit snobby, but I won't lie - if my wife and I were to move back to Utah in 8-10 years and we have the incomes I project we'll have in 8-10 years, Cottonwood Heights will probably be at the top of my list of places to live. Great schools, moderate politics, beautiful housing stock. There's a lot going for CH.
Best city for retirees: Ogden - I think I'll get some disagreement here, but Ogden is beautiful. It's relatively safe in many parts and the low cost of living coupled with a quaint walkable downtown, proximity to outdoors, and proximity to great medical care makes Ogden a wonderful place to retire.
Most improved city since 2000: Midvale - Seriously, does anyone remember how sketchy Midvale used to be in 2000? Between the crime and the smelter, and the multiple toxic waste sites... Midvale was rough. Today it's a place I'd consider a relatively decent, if-modest, place to call home.
Most improvable, promising city going forward: South Salt Lake - SSL is pretty rough today, there's no way to paint it otherwise, but it benefits from a great location and the proposed Olympus High development could really be an economic anchor for the city.
Most desirable "Affordable" city: West Valley City - It's an affordable city from Redwood to 7200, but many people don't realize how nice it gets out past 5600. You can still buy good condition homes for under 200k, but on top of this you get a short commute, access to all that SLC has to offer, and if you know the area you can find somewhere you're even proud to call home, as I once did.
Most Down-to-Earth "high-income" city: North Ogden - I think North Ogden often gets overlooked as a higher income area because it says "Ogden" in its name, but for a bunch of farm kids there are some high incomes and beautiful homes up there, but you'd never know it because they don't play "Keep up with the Youngs" quite as much as you see in places like Lehi, Draper, Kaysville, etc.
Best inner-ring suburb: East Millcreek - East Millcreek has a great mix of everything an inner-ring suburb should have. Walkable neighborhoods with well kept homes, decent schools, proximity to the city, and diverse population. One of the better places in the entire metro, if you ask me.
Best outer-ring suburb: South Jordan - Okay, I'll say it. In general I love to hate on South Valley, but if I were going to live in soulless suburbia, South Jordan (and specifically Daybreak) would be my poison. I love the modern architecture, walkable streets, street-side diners and shops. South Jordan is doing things right when it comes to urban development - my gripe would be, could I handle my neighbors?
Best exurb: Midway - I'm not much of an exurbanite, but if I had to live somewhere an hour away from my office it had better have character, and Midway has a lot of character.
Best "core" city (Salt Lake City, Provo, or Ogden): Salt Lake City - no question in my mind.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2017, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
26,305 posts, read 27,598,029 times
Reputation: 12544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
Best city for older families: Cottonwood Heights - It's a bit snobby, but I won't lie - if my wife and I were to move back to Utah in 8-10 years and we have the incomes I project we'll have in 8-10 years, Cottonwood Heights will probably be at the top of my list of places to live. Great schools, moderate politics, beautiful housing stock. There's a lot going for CH.
My only comments are going to be regarding Cottonwood Heights, where I've lived for 35 years now. Many young couples who could afford to buy in this area did so back in the early 1970s, when much of the area was first being developed. We didn't come here till 1982, but we were about the age of most of our neighbors back then. I'd say that the median age of the adults living in Cottonwood Heights back then was probably about 40. We raised our kids here; they're now off and on their own. A good many of the long-time residents like us are now in their 60's, 70's and with even a few in their 80s. Some are choosing to move out of the area, mostly to places like St. George, and almost none of the people moving in are "older families." They are almost entirely young couples, newly-weds, or couples in their 30s with small children. There is a new elementary and an almost new middle school in my area. They definitely weren't built with "older families" in mind. Over the years, Cottonwood Heights transitioned from young couples with small children to middle-aged couples with high school-aged kids, to empty nesters to young couples with small children. In addition, Cottonwood Heights is the least snobby place I've ever lived in my nearly 46 years of marriage.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2017, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,787 posts, read 2,421,704 times
Reputation: 3594
That's fair, you certainly know your city better than I, but I still maintain that if I were 40-45ish, with my wife and I both established in our careers, we would be looking at Cottonwood Heights for the good high schools (Brighton/Cottonwood - technically Holladay?), fantastic access to the outdoors, and proximity to big-box stores without losing that charming feeling that so many other suburbs further south completely lack. I don't believe your typical 25-35 year old family can afford a $400,000 home (in fact, unless mom and dad are wealthy I can assure you that they cannot). Throw in the cost of daycare if both parents work or the one-income handicap if one parent stays home and Cottonwood Heights is not a great community for your typical family with kids under 6. If they both work and have no kids, then yeah - no problem, but.. a family of 4+? Probably not affordable for the vast majority. In fact, at 13.1% of the populating being between 45-55 and a median age of 36, this makes it one of the older communities in the area (Contrast with SL County which is 11.5% 45-54 with a median age of 31.1).
Source is ACS 2015 Numbers.

What would you suggest is the best community in the region for older families? Actually I'd be really interested in your perspective on all of these, and was kind of hoping you'd reply. Though we agree on very little when it comes to religion topics, I think you have one of the more sensible and practical perspectives on the region as a whole.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2017, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
26,305 posts, read 27,598,029 times
Reputation: 12544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
That's fair, you certainly know your city better than I, but I still maintain that if I were 40-45ish, with my wife and I both established in our careers, we would be looking at Cottonwood Heights for the good high schools (Brighton/Cottonwood - technically Holladay?), fantastic access to the outdoors, and proximity to big-box stores without losing that charming feeling that so many other suburbs further south completely lack. I don't believe your typical 25-35 year old family can afford a $400,000 home (in fact, unless mom and dad are wealthy I can assure you that they cannot). Throw in the cost of daycare if both parents work or the one-income handicap if one parent stays home and Cottonwood Heights is not a great community for your typical family with kids under 6. If they both work and have no kids, then yeah - no problem, but.. a family of 4+? Probably not affordable for the vast majority. In fact, at 13.1% of the populating being between 45-55 and a median age of 36, this makes it one of the older communities in the area (Contrast with SL County which is 11.5% 45-54 with a median age of 31.1).
Source is ACS 2015 Numbers.
I stopped a long time ago trying to figure out how anybody can afford to live in places I wouldn't think they could afford to live. I honestly don't know how young couples can afford to move into my neighborhood (not that it's all the ritzy, believe me), but that is who is moving in. The elementary school my kids attended was torn down a few years ago. Last year, another one was demolished. In its place a new one was built that I swear looks more like a high school than an elementary school.

Since you are familiar with the structure of LDS wards, let me just say this about my ward. It's almost all either older couples like me and my husband (ages 74 and 68) or young families with Primary-age kids. Our ward has something like two deacons. The High Priests pass the sacrament. The Young Women and Young Men programs are practically non-existent, and we have maybe one or two missionaries out right now. I can remember the time, years back, when we had over a dozen kids on missions at once. Between missionary farewells and homecomings, that's pretty much all we had time for. The Primary, on the other hand, is growing by leaps and bounds. So it's retirees and newlyweds with not much in between.

Quote:
What would you suggest is the best community in the region for older families? Actually I'd be really interested in your perspective on all of these, and was kind of hoping you'd reply. Though we agree on very little when it comes to religion topics, I think you have one of the more sensible and practical perspectives on the region as a whole.
As far as I'm concerned, Cottonwood Heights is pretty much the perfect place for older families, even if they're not the ones moving in. I'd respond to your other criteria, but I really don't have enough first-hand knowledge to give very reliable information. I do often suggest to single people (young or old) that they look into living either Downtown, in Sugar House, the Avenues or near the "U". I've lived on the East Side for my entire life except for one brief (7-8 month) period when my husband and I found ourselves in Chesterfield central. I can't even tell you what a nightmare that was. That was my one and only West Side experience, and while I am 100% willing to acknowledge Chesterfield isn't your typical West Side neighborhood, it left a sufficiently bad taste in my mouth to keep me on the East Side. I don't like to bad-mouth the West Side of the city, so I'll leave the discussion of all West Side neighborhoods to people who have actually lived in them.

If I didn't live in Cottonwood Heights, I could be happy in Holladay. I couldn't afford to live anywhere like the newer part of Federal Heights or up on the upper, upper East Bench, and I wouldn't really want to live in either Sandy or Draper, even in the nicer parts of the cities.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2017, 09:33 PM
 
8,474 posts, read 5,633,967 times
Reputation: 13950
X2 on a young family in bountiful... it's super quiet boring and safe just like we like it. The kids are nice here and we meet tons of other young families all the time.

Some decent mixed of dining options and good golf courses for me. Accessible to highways and able to get downtown easily. Only downsides are the gas plants in nsl/ woods cross but were 2/3 up the east bench so out of sight and mind.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2017, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,787 posts, read 2,421,704 times
Reputation: 3594
nobody wants to take a stab at their top towns for each scenario?

C'mon, I know we've got some strong opinions on here, and certainly some people who know the metro area better than I! It could lead to some fun discussion, too! Why is Sandy better than Farmington for older families? Oh, it's not? Well, why is Farmington better then Sandy?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2017, 07:43 PM
 
Location: A Place With REAL People
3,214 posts, read 6,321,544 times
Reputation: 4936
Oh what the heck I'll take a wild stab at this.

Best city for young singles:
1st choice is simple, Salt Lake City proper, 2nd and only other one would be SugarHouse area.

Best city for young families:
No doubt Cottonwood Hts, as Number 1, 2nd I'd say the Highland Park neighborhood area just North of E. Millcreek. Good schools and good neighborhood for kid environment.

Best city for older families:
Not sure what "older" means but perhaps E. Millcreek/Holladay area.

Best city for retirees:
Only one sorry to say....St. George.

Most improved city since 2000:
Probably SugarHouse area

Most improvable, promising city going forward:
Tough one, there are so many to consider but for some Daybreak seems to be a strong on in South Jordan

Most desirable "Affordable" city:
Sorry I'm NOT going to add a west valley area to this one. West Jordan is as far north as I'd consider in this category.

Most Down-to-Earth "high-income" city:
Just a stab at it but likely Cottonwood Hts.

Best inner-ring suburb:
A bit confusing, how inner are we talking about? I tend to favor Holladay area.

Best outer-ring suburb:
South Jordan

Best exurb:
Alpine

Best "core" city (Salt Lake City, Provo, or Ogden):
Most probably Salt Lake if you are talking about the nicer living spaces.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2017, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
128 posts, read 251,246 times
Reputation: 177
Ok I will try this one out.

Best city for young singles:

I believe the best areas to be young and single are all in SLC including: Sugarhouse, 9th and 9th, central city, central 9th, downtown, and Marmalade. I do have to say that Ogden has a fun area in 25th street that might be good for a young single person.

Best city for young families:

I grew up in the northern Wasatch front in the Ogden area and in my opinion I would say LAYTON. Layton is a very family friendly city with many nice neighborhoods and family friendly things to do nearby(Cherry Hills, Lagoon). But because of Hill Air Force Base I find it to be a mildly diverse area with many people from vastly different backgrounds, which is what I would want my kids to grow up with.

Best city for older families:

I would say Holladay or Eastern SLC in the 15th and 15th area going east. Both are very charming areas that are family friendly, but are close to many amenities and have nice walkable areas close by.

Best city for retirees:

Honestly if anyone hasn't been to Kanab, it was a great smaller town with similar amenities to Moab with great hiking/biking. If I need to go to a bigger city St. George and Cedar are not to far away. If I went another route I would say downtown Salt Lake, because its walkable with everything I would need, and I wouldn't have to drive most places.

Most improved city since 2000:

I think Ogden has really improved in the last 17 years. Growing up in Ogden and going to Ogden High, parts of the city were really rundown and we never went downtown except for Ogden Raptors Baseball. Now it feels that Ogden residents are starting to regain the pride for their city, and 25th is getting better by the year. There is still a lot of work to do, but it is really nice to see how well Ogden is doing.

Most improvable, promising city going forward:

Last year I moved back to SLC from Chicago, and I guess I got spoiled with Chicago's downtown. When I go to downtown in SLC I see so much more promise than what is there. While SLC has grown more dense in the last 15 years, there is still way to many gaps in walkability and density in the downtown area(wayyy to many parking lots). I would like downtown to continue adding residential units, more office space, and all the other things will follow.
Most desirable "Affordable" city:

Personally I would probably move to Rose Park or West Valley if I wanted to move to a more affordable area. I worked in WVC for 3 years and never felt unsafe, and I enjoy the diversity that WVC has it reminds me of Chicago(in a good way).

Most Down-to-Earth "high-income" city:

I don't know alot of the east side areas as well as other parts of the city, but I always enjoy going to the Holladay area and find everyone there to be really nice.

Best inner-ring suburb:

Since I keep saying Holladay I will just jot this down as the best inner ring suburb.


Best outer-ring suburb:

Sandy, because it is actively growing and is making steps to gain more amenities (shopping, eating other than chains, REAL salt Lake, Hale Theatre). It also has Trax stops and the frontrunner is not to far away, so if I had to move further out I don't think I would mind being out in Sandy.

Best exurb:

Huntsville or Morgan, quaint mountain towns really close to Ogden.

Best "core" city (Salt Lake City, Provo, or Ogden):

Salt Lake City is the most logical choice for me. I still think of it as the heart of our state and I try to actively support the local businesses in SLC. It's a great place to live and is continuing to get better in my opinion as long as it can stay affordable and keep that perfect quality of life that has big city amenities with the small town feeling. Ogden and Provo are also improving but in my opinion they have a long way to go to unseet Salt Lake City, just because it has so many cultural things that I enjoy that I couldn't get in Ogden or Provo.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2018, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Illinois
3,028 posts, read 2,754,473 times
Reputation: 3962
As far as the most desirable affluent neighborhoods within Salt Lake County, what say those on this forum?

Given a choice, would you choose to live in Capitol Hill (Ensign Downs), Greater Avenues (Northcrest, Arlington Hills, Federal Heights), Sugarhouse (Country Club), Holladay, or somewhere else?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Utah > Salt Lake City area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top