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Old 06-22-2019, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
1,059 posts, read 2,042,944 times
Reputation: 1151

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I'm still a relative newbie to the SLC area myself, having moved here from the east coast last year. You didn't mention how old you and your husband are, which could influence your decision on which neighborhoods would be more attractive to you. I could be wrong about this (and those who have been here longer please correct me if I am), but Sugarhouse from what I know seems to attract a younger demographic (20s and 30s) than some other parts of the SLC valley. Just based on what I've seen from driving around, Sugarhouse and The Avenues (which are both close to the U of U) seem to be the only areas that really have older homes with more character than the suburban homes you'll see in some other places such as Sandy and Draper. You'll have to check on sites such as Trulia, Zillow and realtor.com to see what homes are renting for in these places as I really don't know myself.

As Katzpur suggested, Cottonwood Heights does meet a lot of your requirements, with the exception of finding the types of homes you described. In that area, you might want to look at the Pinnacle Highland apartments at the intersection of Highland Drive and Bengal Blvd as I believe they fall within your price range (for a 1 BR apt) and have great views of the mountains. I'd also suggest looking in the parts of Sandy that are west of State Street (aka Route 89). Sandy has lots of parks and has 3 light rail stations. Dimple Dell park and Lone Peak Park are both nice places to walk with great views of the Wasatch mountains to the east. Mountain views are abundant in the Salt Lake valley, so even if you don't have a mountain view from the balcony of your apartment, if you walk outside a little bit, you're likely to see mountains in the distance. From what I've seen, Draper and South Jordan seem to be the two places where horses are more likely to be found, though both of these also seem to be more family oriented communities.

I have some experience with the light rail system here, as I've been both an operator (for a short time) and a passenger. In general, I think the light rail is an effective way of getting around here, though it does have its limitations. Going north and south, you are limited to using the TRAX blue line, which you can use between downtown SLC and Draper (its southernmost point). To get from anywhere along the blue line to the University of Utah, for example, you have to change trains to the red line, which also goes through a portion of downtown before heading east over to the university. The green line will take you between the airport and West Valley City. The light rail trains run every 15 minutes on weekdays (they run on weekends too, but with longer times between trains), though there may be occasional service delays. You will occasionally see homeless people riding the trains; this is more likely during the colder winter months. The Utah Transit Authority which owns and operates the buses and trains here has their own police department which is pretty good at responding to any issues with passengers that they are made aware of. They can't place officers on every train, but they do randomly show up on the trains to walk through and keep everything safe and also to check passenger's fare tickets. At the end of the service day (a little past midnight) the trains are brought back to one of two service yards and cleaned for the next day.

As someone else already said, the only places that you can go to get away from the winter inversions are up into the mountains, such as Park City. Unfortunately the entire valley floor suffers from the ugly haze and poor air quality during the inversions.

EDIT: I meant to write also that while Sugar House does have a nice, large park in it, the few times that I've been there I have seen homeless people in it, whereas I have yet to see any homeless people in any of the parks I've been to in Sandy or Draper.

Last edited by manyroads; 06-22-2019 at 01:49 PM..
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Old 06-22-2019, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
1,059 posts, read 2,042,944 times
Reputation: 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
Sugarhouse. Cottonwood Heights, while nice, is tract suburbia to the max and won't satisfy your preference for historic homes. Sugarhouse is also better situated for mass transit. Your budget might be an issue though. Being outside the inversions means going over to the Park City side (Wasatch back) of MUCH farther away.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
Sugar House is NOT tract suburbia. My house in the middle of Sugar House was built in 1921, as were most of the houses on my street.
SouthernBelle, I think you may have misread kletter1mann's post. He was saying that CH is tract suburbia, not Sugar House.
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Old 06-22-2019, 02:11 PM
 
222 posts, read 136,447 times
Reputation: 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
I (as one of the "unnamed posters" you clearly have a very low opinion of) disagree. Here were the OPs requirements:

Access to the outdoors, especially quick access to the mountains during ski season and summer. (Cottonwood heights meets this requirement more than any other Salt Lake area neighborhood.)

Peace and quiet more than bustling activity, but it would also be great to be close (walking or biking distance) to grocery store and a coffee shop. My absolute dream would be to have a mountain view.
(At least some parts of Cottonwood Heights meet this requirement perfectly.)

Safety and low levels of homelessness are both a must for our immediate neighborhood.
(I've lived in Cottonwood Heights for 37 years and have had one automobile break-in and zero home break-ins in that period of time.)

Public transit opportunities with convenient clean light rail and bus systems.
(Cottonwood Heights once again qualifies, better than most of the nicer neighborhoods in the Salt Lake area.)

Looking for a neighborhood where that will stand out in any negative way or where all the activities revolve around being LDS.
(Realtors will tell people that Cottonwood Heights is considered to be among the most non-LDS friendly parts of the Salt Lake valley (outside of Salt Lake City proper). Two-thirds of the households on my Cottonwood Heights street are non-LDS.

I ride horses and will need to find a new stable. Minimizing drive time from home would be ideal.
(Cottonwood Heights is close to Draper, where horses could be stabled. That's not the case with any other area neighborhoods except for Sandy and some west-side neighborhoods that wouldn't meet the OP's other criteria as well.)

Unfortunately, there are no "historic homes (Victorian, Craftsman, etc.) in the neighborhoods Cottonwood Heights, but hey, you can't have everything you want.

Have I done something to rub you the wrong way, slomofo? I'm sure getting that impression?

You have never done anything to offend me, but sometimes it seems you're setting people up for failure because your lack of familiarity with the rest of the Wasatch front only allows for you to recommend one place and this place often times does not fit well with people's requirements.


Can you provide me with ten links in cottonwood heights with historic houses for rent priced at or below $1500 per month?


Ya know what? Yeah, I guess you did say that there aren't any historic houses, so how about just listing any houses. Can you do that?



As you said, no historic houses, you can't have everything you want when living in Cottonwood Heights, but what if they can't get the price they want? Should she be planning on getting a second job? Or downgrading to an apartment?


If you don't see my point here, you never will. Take the information provided by the OP, apply that information to the entire area, and find the appropriate location.

Checklist for Cottonwood heights in relation to OP's designated criteria:

Desired home style - No
Desired home price - No
Public transportation - No
Close proximity to the University - No
Outdoor recreation - Yes
Non-LDS - Borderline
Horses - No
Low homelessness - Yes
Safety - Yes and No (High property crimes, see attached image)
Air quality - No


Using that checklist, I ruled out cottonwood heights. I have no bias towards any particular area, so I'm not going to fabricate details to make an area seem more appealing.
Attached Thumbnails
Which neighborhoods to tour before a potential move-screenshot_20190622-132036_google.jpg   Which neighborhoods to tour before a potential move-screenshot_20190622-134259_chrome.jpg  
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Old 06-22-2019, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
1,059 posts, read 2,042,944 times
Reputation: 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by slomofo View Post
As you said, no historic houses, you can't have everything you want when living in Cottonwood Heights, but what if they can't get the price they want? Should she be planning on getting a second job? Or downgrading to an apartment?

Checklist for Cottonwood heights in relation to OP's designated criteria:

Desired home style - No
Desired home price - No
Public transportation - No
Close proximity to the University - No
Outdoor recreation - Yes
Non-LDS - Borderline
Horses - No
Low homelessness - Yes
Safety - Yes and No (High property crimes, see attached image)
Air quality - No


Using that checklist, I ruled out cottonwood heights. I have no bias towards any particular area, so I'm not going to fabricate details to make an area seem more appealing.
Not that katzpur can't defend her own comments, but I take issue also with some of the things you've said about Cottonwood Heights as being an area that the OP might want to consider (and I don't live in CH).

First off, the OP said that she has lived in apartments before, but "it would be lovely" to find a historic home that had such and such. In my interpretation, that means she is still open to renting an apartment within her budget, but would prefer an older home in good condition if she can find one. It takes time to get to know a new area, and the positives and negatives of the different communities within it. Right now, the OP said that she has applied for several jobs at U of U. That doesn't mean that she will be offered any of them, or will choose to accept any of those offers there that she may receive. We also do not know where her husband will be working. For all we know right now, he might end up with a job down in Lehi or somewhere else in Utah county. The OP and her husband will have to decide how long they are willing to commute, and what location will be convenient for where BOTH of them will be working. Right now, we don't have that information. I think the OP will have to do some of her own research online about where houses in the valley are located that will fit her budget and also possibly have the design and character that she is seeking.

As far as public transportation is concerned, UTA has bus routes that run just about everywhere through the valley, including Cottonwood Heights. While Sugar House does have the S-Line streetcar that connects with the main TRAX line, it's still possible to take a bus or car to a light rail station from other communities. I did not mention the FrontRunner in my earlier post, however that line is farther to the west than the areas that would likely interest the OP.

There seem to be few places that I know of where one will find stables or places to ride horses; as I said before, Draper and South Jordan come to mind. Certainly one isn't going to find any horse stables in Sugar House.

I don't think there is any place in the Salt Lake Valley that is immune to crime. Some places seem to experience it more frequently than others (West Valley City seems to be on the higher end), but even Sandy is in the news regarding crime now and then.

There is no place in the entire Salt Lake valley that I'm aware of that doesn't experience bad air quality due to the winter inversions.
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Old 06-22-2019, 07:52 PM
 
187 posts, read 95,546 times
Reputation: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyroads View Post
I'm still a relative newbie to the SLC area myself, having moved here from the east coast last year. You didn't mention how old you and your husband are, which could influence your decision on which neighborhoods would be more attractive to you. I could be wrong about this (and those who have been here longer please correct me if I am), but Sugarhouse from what I know seems to attract a younger demographic (20s and 30s) than some other parts of the SLC valley. Just based on what I've seen from driving around, Sugarhouse and The Avenues (which are both close to the U of U) seem to be the only areas that really have older homes with more character than the suburban homes you'll see in some other places such as Sandy and Draper. You'll have to check on sites such as Trulia, Zillow and realtor.com to see what homes are renting for in these places as I really don't know myself.

As Katzpur suggested, Cottonwood Heights does meet a lot of your requirements, with the exception of finding the types of homes you described. In that area, you might want to look at the Pinnacle Highland apartments at the intersection of Highland Drive and Bengal Blvd as I believe they fall within your price range (for a 1 BR apt) and have great views of the mountains. I'd also suggest looking in the parts of Sandy that are west of State Street (aka Route 89). Sandy has lots of parks and has 3 light rail stations. Dimple Dell park and Lone Peak Park are both nice places to walk with great views of the Wasatch mountains to the east. Mountain views are abundant in the Salt Lake valley, so even if you don't have a mountain view from the balcony of your apartment, if you walk outside a little bit, you're likely to see mountains in the distance. From what I've seen, Draper and South Jordan seem to be the two places where horses are more likely to be found, though both of these also seem to be more family oriented communities.

I have some experience with the light rail system here, as I've been both an operator (for a short time) and a passenger. In general, I think the light rail is an effective way of getting around here, though it does have its limitations. Going north and south, you are limited to using the TRAX blue line, which you can use between downtown SLC and Draper (its southernmost point). To get from anywhere along the blue line to the University of Utah, for example, you have to change trains to the red line, which also goes through a portion of downtown before heading east over to the university. The green line will take you between the airport and West Valley City. The light rail trains run every 15 minutes on weekdays (they run on weekends too, but with longer times between trains), though there may be occasional service delays. You will occasionally see homeless people riding the trains; this is more likely during the colder winter months. The Utah Transit Authority which owns and operates the buses and trains here has their own police department which is pretty good at responding to any issues with passengers that they are made aware of. They can't place officers on every train, but they do randomly show up on the trains to walk through and keep everything safe and also to check passenger's fare tickets. At the end of the service day (a little past midnight) the trains are brought back to one of two service yards and cleaned for the next day.

As someone else already said, the only places that you can go to get away from the winter inversions are up into the mountains, such as Park City. Unfortunately the entire valley floor suffers from the ugly haze and poor air quality during the inversions.

EDIT: I meant to write also that while Sugar House does have a nice, large park in it, the few times that I've been there I have seen homeless people in it, whereas I have yet to see any homeless people in any of the parks I've been to in Sandy or Draper.
As someone who goes through sugarhouse park daily, the homeless influence in that park is minimal at best. Now Fairmont has a bit more but Has cleaned up as well.
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:10 PM
Status: "Proud Mormon Democrat" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Salt Lake City
23,691 posts, read 24,103,445 times
Reputation: 11517
Quote:
Originally Posted by slomofo View Post
You have never done anything to offend me, but sometimes it seems you're setting people up for failure because your lack of familiarity with the rest of the Wasatch front only allows for you to recommend one place and this place often times does not fit well with people's requirements.
I have, on numerous occasions, recommended Downtown, Sugarhouse, the Avenues, and Holladay.

Quote:
Can you provide me with ten links in cottonwood heights with historic houses for rent priced at or below $1500 per month?

Ya know what? Yeah, I guess you did say that there aren't any historic houses, so how about just listing any houses. Can you do that?
The OP says "we have typically rented apartments" and there are plenty of apartments in Cottonwood Heights, as well as numerous duplexes.[/quote]

Quote:
If you don't see my point here, you never will. Take the information provided by the OP, apply that information to the entire area, and find the appropriate location.
And I did so. Cottonwood Heights meets most of the OP's requirements, at least as many as any other Salt Lake neighborhood.

Quote:
Checklist for Cottonwood heights in relation to OP's designated criteria:

Desired home style - No
Desired home price - No
Public transportation - No
Close proximity to the University - No
Outdoor recreation - Yes
Non-LDS - Borderline
Horses - No
Low homelessness - Yes
Safety - Yes and No (High property crimes, see attached image)
Air quality - No
So apparently, we have a difference of opinion. I think Cottonwood Heights would be a good match in many of the OP's requirements, but not in all of them, but then there isn't a single, solitary neighborhood that would be a good match in every area.

Quote:
Using that checklist, I ruled out cottonwood heights. I have no bias towards any particular area, so I'm not going to fabricate details to make an area seem more appealing.
Whatever. I didn't fabricate any details either. For instance, maybe you don't consider Cottonwood Heights in close proximity to the U of U, but to me, a 25-minute commute isn't all that bad. On the other hand, I'm pretty sure you're not going to find any horse property adjacent to the U. Price may be an issue, but even that is not certain. No areas in which the OP can find a historic home for less than $1500 a month would meet the OP's other requirements.
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Old 06-23-2019, 09:03 AM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,479 posts, read 5,762,047 times
Reputation: 2859
Quote:
Originally Posted by slomofo View Post
Because two unnamed posters will continually overlook any and all criteria listed in the OP's questions in every single thread they enter and will immediately suggest Cottonwood Heights or Sugarhouse. It happens so often that I'm sick of hearing these two locations mentioned, but in this rare case, Sugarhouse actually checks off a lot of boxes in the OP's listed criteria.

Meanwhile Cottonwood Heights barely meets any of the requirements, but it was still mentioned.
LOL, point taken.
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Old 06-23-2019, 09:48 AM
 
6,419 posts, read 3,787,069 times
Reputation: 11799
OP this would be your best friend:


https://homes.ksl.com/index/rentler


I also suggest learning the zip codes as they are very helpful filters to getting listings in very specific geographies. SLC and the surrounding areas tend to have a ton of confusing geographic areas due to various statuses of unincorporated county land.


Avenues 84103 -> tons of historic properties like you want minimal homeless up on the hill and mixture of working professionals and college renters


Central / East City 84102 -> some historic properties greats access to Trax and other shopping. Higher traffic and elevated levels of homeless although not terrible. IMO the further north and east within these boundaries the better! Lots of rentals....


East Liberty 84105 -> Nice mix of up an coming neighborhoods and established neighborhoods with good access to the city/transit/and Liberty park. Older homes although not victorian and very tight lots with not as many rentals.


Cottonwood 84121
Millcreek / Holladay 84117



I probably wouldn't go south of Cottonwood or west of say 1300E is most areas (especially further in the valley) as a new renter. If your husband is in tech he likely works south in the valley so you'll want to consider that. I tend to be anti-sugarhouse area as I think it's overpriced inconvenient and overrated. The park is fine but for me I'll pass on the rest of the amenities.
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Old 06-27-2019, 07:18 PM
 
5 posts, read 6,097 times
Reputation: 15
Thanks everyone for all the great information! It looks like Sugarhouse and Cottonwood Heights both have pros and cons to consider, but I'm glad to have a few options to tour.
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Old 06-27-2019, 09:26 PM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,479 posts, read 5,762,047 times
Reputation: 2859
Quote:
Originally Posted by lcca2018 View Post
Thanks everyone for all the great information! It looks like Sugarhouse and Cottonwood Heights both have pros and cons to consider, but I'm glad to have a few options to tour.
Ok, here's what you need to understand. In general, the communities here aren't very distinct, they're a continuum and kind of ooze into each other. If Cottonwood Hts and Sugar House are of interest then the towns separating them - Millcreek/East Millcreek and Holladay - should be as well. Holladay, in fact, actually has a small walkable downtown with shops, an upscale market and a handfull of restaurants. It's reminiscent of the northeast or north shore in chicagoland. It's a pleasant relief from the chains and strip malls everywhere else. As far as I know this is unique in all the Wasatch Front.
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