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Old 11-06-2020, 07:10 PM
 
8,476 posts, read 5,638,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 556senditTX View Post
Currently visiting your area and will be applying to jobs next week. I'm coming from Austin, TX and I have to say, I see a lot in common between the cities. Austin is A LOT bigger, but the vibe is somewhat similar between barton springs, hyde park, University heights and the NE area of SLC. I am staying north of highway 80, and east of 89.

This isn't really a good thing for me, as I want to escape the left leaning progressive yuppy areas. I was hoping to do so here in SLC. I am not "right wing" per se, but am a gun rights advocate, and probably have ideals closely related to what a classical liberal would be today.

I enjoy fishing, hiking, shooting, kayaking, hunting, resting in a hammock with a good book, and am always working on a DIY project. I am in my thirties, single, and without kids, no tattoos and rather clean cut.

I work in manufacturing (which is why am I am glued to cities for occupation), and from what it seems, can afford to rent in the majority of areas around town. I would not be turned off by a commute to SLC.

Any ideas on where I would fit in?

Thanks in advance!
Bountiful may be a good fit. We lived there for 3 years before moving to south Jordan. I prefer bountiful and Davis county in general to Salt Lake. It’s far quieter than the valley and is still just around the point of mountain from SLC (15-20 min).

To truly get the best Utah outdoor experience (hunting shooting boating fishing atv snowmobiling). I would suggest Heber / Midway but the commute to SLC would be brutal and it’s pricey.

You might also check out Tooele Stansubury park area as it has a much more “rural” feel.
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Old 11-07-2020, 04:57 PM
 
183 posts, read 82,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
Bountiful may be a good fit. We lived there for 3 years before moving to south Jordan. I prefer bountiful and Davis county in general to Salt Lake. It’s far quieter than the valley and is still just around the point of mountain from SLC (15-20 min).

To truly get the best Utah outdoor experience (hunting shooting boating fishing atv snowmobiling). I would suggest Heber / Midway but the commute to SLC would be brutal and it’s pricey.

You might also check out Tooele Stansubury park area as it has a much more “rural” feel.
Thanks for the info. I was considering Tooele & Stansubury if I get a job in West Valley. Anywhere else may be quite the drive. Not sure Heber/Midway would be a right fit currently. I feel I would need a differnt vehicle for winters, I drive a 2wd reg cab pickup.

Gonna check out Bountiful and Ogden tomorrow!
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Old 11-07-2020, 04:59 PM
 
183 posts, read 82,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainlocal View Post
If you're wanting to escape left leaning yuppies, The Avenues and Sugar House wouldn't be good areas at all.

A couple of thoughts are Cottonwood Heights, Holladay, Sandy, South Jordan, and Bountiful.

Not sure if they would be exactly what you're looking for. These are all suburbs of Salt Lake and within a 25 minutes drive. They will be mostly residential but have some amenities. Likely more families than a single scene, but everyone drives everywhere around here.
Agreed, I didnt care for the avenues or sugar house.

I will check out your suggestions, thanks!
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Old 11-09-2020, 09:53 AM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,586 posts, read 6,542,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiruko View Post
Salt Lake City can feel pretty left-wing, to be honest, and I'm from Illinois. I don't think it's worth sugarcoating either way. Regardless, you'll be living in a state that is comfortably conservative (but pretty sour on Trumpian politics), although definitely more communitarian than just about any other state in this country. That can rub a lot of conservatives/libertarians/classical liberals the wrong way.
Honestly, I just don't see it. I've heard this repeatedly, and usually with such Norman Rockwell examples as helping the old widow shovel out after a blizzard and the like. Or donating to a food bank. All of that is laudable, of course, but I'm not sure how much deeper it really goes. It kind of strikes me as a kind of self-congratulatory mythology going back to pioneer days. After all, respect for The Commons is inherent in communitarianism. Yet the prevailing culture seems to have little regard for The Commons. To the contrary, it strikes me that the ethos of [liberty] = [Nobody can tell me what to do] dominates, followed closely by chasing $$$. The drill-baby-drill for private profit, extractive mindset and associated environmental indifference are an affront to the concept of The Commons. I'm generalizing of course, and also attributing the actions of the state gov't to the people who select representatives &/or tolerate what it does.

Communitarianism certainly hasn't extended to responsible behavior in the pandemic where the need couldn't be greater. The liberal, socialist, commies in NYC etc managed covid far more effectively by tolerating some personal inconvenience, or even suffering, for a greater good. Yet all our governor's pleadings for greater individual responsibility, doing the right thing, etc have been ignored by far, far too many - huge social gatherings, mask protests etc. continue. And so here we are.

Ironically though, and most germane to neighborhood selection, I'd argue that the areas that are, in reality, most communitarian (using responsible covid practices as a proxy for respect for the commons) are also the most liberal (SLC and first ring suburbs).



[sidebar comment: Interesting that communitarianism, community, commune and communism all share the same root. YMMV.]
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Old 11-12-2020, 03:24 PM
 
Location: The other side of the mountain
2,499 posts, read 6,684,379 times
Reputation: 1292
Quote:
Originally Posted by 556senditTX View Post
Thanks for the info. I was considering Tooele & Stansubury if I get a job in West Valley. Anywhere else may be quite the drive. Not sure Heber/Midway would be a right fit currently. I feel I would need a differnt vehicle for winters, I drive a 2wd reg cab pickup.

Gonna check out Bountiful and Ogden tomorrow!
We live in Stansbury Park and my husband commutes from our home to approximately 2100 S West Temple every day. It takes him right around 30 minutes. Obviously, if he hits traffic or weather, that can stretch out, but by and large, it isn’t a bad commute to most any place.
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Old 11-12-2020, 09:06 PM
 
338 posts, read 269,281 times
Reputation: 767
Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
Honestly, I just don't see it. I've heard this repeatedly, and usually with such Norman Rockwell examples as helping the old widow shovel out after a blizzard and the like. Or donating to a food bank. All of that is laudable, of course, but I'm not sure how much deeper it really goes. It kind of strikes me as a kind of self-congratulatory mythology going back to pioneer days. After all, respect for The Commons is inherent in communitarianism. Yet the prevailing culture seems to have little regard for The Commons. To the contrary, it strikes me that the ethos of [liberty] = [Nobody can tell me what to do] dominates, followed closely by chasing $$$. The drill-baby-drill for private profit, extractive mindset and associated environmental indifference are an affront to the concept of The Commons. I'm generalizing of course, and also attributing the actions of the state gov't to the people who select representatives &/or tolerate what it does.

Communitarianism certainly hasn't extended to responsible behavior in the pandemic where the need couldn't be greater. The liberal, socialist, commies in NYC etc managed covid far more effectively by tolerating some personal inconvenience, or even suffering, for a greater good. Yet all our governor's pleadings for greater individual responsibility, doing the right thing, etc have been ignored by far, far too many - huge social gatherings, mask protests etc. continue. And so here we are.

Ironically though, and most germane to neighborhood selection, I'd argue that the areas that are, in reality, most communitarian (using responsible covid practices as a proxy for respect for the commons) are also the most liberal (SLC and first ring suburbs).



[sidebar comment: Interesting that communitarianism, community, commune and communism all share the same root. YMMV.]
You made some good points.

I consider this region to be more communitarian than just about anywhere else in the US. There is an interesting mix of communitarian, pro-business (sometimes at the expense of the greater good), and embracing personal liberty.

I would expect - and indeed did expect - that a community that values the common good would have been more proactive about the pandemic, the air quality, the environment, public education, etc. Considering that people here *will* shovel snow for a neighbor and donate to food banks, among many other things, I was surprised at the pervasive "no one can make me" and "it's my constitutional right" attitude here about mask-wearing and socially distancing. I've also seen a lot of "I don't have six kids, so I shouldn't have to pay taxes to support education". It's definitely not everyone, but that "me, me, me" mentality is here, too.

You're right, kletter1mann, it doesn't quite add up.

On the other hand, that same "me, me, me" mentality is prevalent in much of the rest of the country, minus the shoveling of the neighbor's sidewalk and other Norman Rockwell communitarian characteristics.

I think a lot of the individuals who are anti-mask and demonstrate refusal to socially distance are going to be that way until the virus starts personally impacting them. There is a human tendency to think "that won't happen to me". Similar to how people think they won't get cancer. Or they don't need seat belts. How many years did it take our country to move from smoking being socially acceptable, to smoking being actively discouraged, once it was understood to be carcinogenic? A long time.

Wearing masks and socially distancing is just not part of the culture here. It takes time for cultures to adapt, and asking people to do this is a big, sudden change from their norm.

NYC got hit first, and hard, and fast. It would have been nice if the rest of the country learned from their experience, and changed its behavior, but that would be an unrealistic expectation. People as a group seem to need to learn the long, hard way. Otherwise the US would have followed the lead of the other countries who already had comprehensive plans in place for pandemics, because they had been through SARS, and already understood mask-wearing, contact tracing, etc, and therefore quickly got covid-19 under control. Instead of following their example, our country wasted precious time, had to fumble around, and figure it out on our own. And here we are.

Last edited by English Ivy; 11-12-2020 at 10:21 PM..
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Old 11-12-2020, 09:26 PM
 
338 posts, read 269,281 times
Reputation: 767
Quote:
Originally Posted by 556senditTX View Post
Currently visiting your area and will be applying to jobs next week. I'm coming from Austin, TX and I have to say, I see a lot in common between the cities. Austin is A LOT bigger, but the vibe is somewhat similar between barton springs, hyde park, University heights and the NE area of SLC. I am staying north of highway 80, and east of 89.

This isn't really a good thing for me, as I want to escape the left leaning progressive yuppy areas. I was hoping to do so here in SLC. I am not "right wing" per se, but am a gun rights advocate, and probably have ideals closely related to what a classical liberal would be today.

I enjoy fishing, hiking, shooting, kayaking, hunting, resting in a hammock with a good book, and am always working on a DIY project. I am in my thirties, single, and without kids, no tattoos and rather clean cut.

I work in manufacturing (which is why am I am glued to cities for occupation), and from what it seems, can afford to rent in the majority of areas around town. I would not be turned off by a commute to SLC.

Any ideas on where I would fit in?

Thanks in advance!
Magna, maybe?

Or possibly Riverton/Herriman area.
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