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Old 02-11-2010, 05:00 PM
 
Location: DEN-CO
360 posts, read 982,409 times
Reputation: 122

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I agree with Kids, if you live in it during winter, you are breathing it in, and the chances of doing long term damage to your health is real. I did however, notice while walking downtown this time, the air smelled a bit foul, guess I'm breathing in vehicle fumes. Basically, the inversion is mostly in January, and if you have problems, you would best limit your outdoor activities during all red alert days.

I wish UTA would give free rides on red air days, this is done in D.C. and it encourages more mass transit while the air is at its worst. BTW , UTA is giving a free ride day on Feb. 12th. Maybe this is the sign they are moving towards this during bad air days.

P.S. Cache Valley, Logan seem to have it worse than SL Valley. Good luck.
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Old 02-11-2010, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Arkansas
39 posts, read 87,432 times
Reputation: 56
Yeah, when the inversion is prolonged, it gets bad in the valley. And it costs a lot to live above it. This year's bad inversion was worse and lasted longer than last year's (I only have two winters under my belt here). My wife and I are in our mid 30s, are pretty healthy, and don't have asthma, but we definitely noticed effects this year. Mild, annoying headaches and a little sinus trouble. I'm a little worried about it, myself, and may make the sacrifices necessary to move out of the valley to get out of it. Not sure yet. But I will say, we really do appreciate the quality of life here OTHER than the pollution. I think the pollution can get better if the population can be convinced the sacrifice is worth it. Unfortunately, the largest contributers of the car exhaust (suburbanites) are also, in my experience, the hard core anti-science climate change denying type, so there's some work to do.
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Old 02-12-2010, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Hagerman, Idaho
2,205 posts, read 4,793,011 times
Reputation: 2067
I drive 7 miles to work Monday through Friday. On weekends for the most part my car stays in the garage parked. My car is an 04 and easily exceeds the emissions standards when tested yearly (it's not some dark smoke belching or older hydrocarbon puffing pickup truck of which there are farrrrrr too many). I drive from Herriman to West Jordan. There is NO other mode of transportation and there is nobody I know near me that works in the same immediate area with which I could carpool at the times I commute. With that said, in comparison to those that live in say....Draper or Sandy that commute to downtown or the University daily, have several kids whom they drive to school, soccer practice, school functions, shopping, to the mall etc. I'd say I'm am very much the lessor offender of polluting contributors.
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Old 02-12-2010, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Arkansas
39 posts, read 87,432 times
Reputation: 56
Yes, I apologize, it's unfair of me to make that generalization based mostly on the people I work with. I understand people have to get around, but I think that it just makes sense to me to live closer to where you work than some of the aforementioned people.. The public transit infrastructure will be key to reducing these emissions, lets just hope the investments made so far continue to happen. This city has a lot going for it.
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Old 02-15-2010, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Imaginary Figment
11,457 posts, read 12,282,308 times
Reputation: 4757
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpetbagger View Post
Unfortunately, the largest contributers of the car exhaust (suburbanites) are also, in my experience, the hard core anti-science climate change denying type, so there's some work to do.

Utah delivers vote of no confidence for 'climate alarmists' | Environment | guardian.co.uk
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Old 02-15-2010, 03:24 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake, Utah
427 posts, read 1,118,008 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5280milehiguy View Post
I agree with Kids, if you live in it during winter, you are breathing it in, and the chances of doing long term damage to your health is real. I did however, notice while walking downtown this time, the air smelled a bit foul, guess I'm breathing in vehicle fumes. Basically, the inversion is mostly in January, and if you have problems, you would best limit your outdoor activities during all red alert days.

I wish UTA would give free rides on red air days, this is done in D.C. and it encourages more mass transit while the air is at its worst. BTW , UTA is giving a free ride day on Feb. 12th. Maybe this is the sign they are moving towards this during bad air days.

P.S. Cache Valley, Logan seem to have it worse than SL Valley. Good luck.
The downside to public transit during red air days, is you force yourself to be outside, weather waiting for the transit, or walking / biking to a station.

Typically the 4 metro areas comprising Northern Utah have the worst air in the nation during inversions here. I've noticed some times Cache Valley is worst, some times Provo, etc.
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Old 02-16-2010, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Overland Park, Kansas
7 posts, read 25,754 times
Reputation: 13
Wow. Thanks for all the info! I didn't know the inversion is worse only in the winter, so that's good to know. Yes, it doesn't help when everyone is not on the same page, working together to make better decision to help reduce pollutants. But, such is life. My hubby was a respiratory therapist first, before gradutating with his EE so he is well aware of the long term effects of such problems. It's easy to think its not effecting you when you are feeling fine from day to day. He has a second phone interview this week so we are a step closer to the possibility of moving. Draper is where the company is located so I'm going to research info about non LDS living there. We are spiritual yet non religious couple so I'm hoping we can find a great place to live, along with others with our same beliefs. Do any of you live in the Draper area? Input? We are in our mid 30's with no plans of having children(90%sure) so we aren't sure a cu-de sac familytype neighborhood would be a great fit. I may need to move this area of conversation to another thread. Wish us luck and thanks for all your help!

@ SkiBarbie: that's great news about UTvsKS winters. They are brutal in our opinion so we were worried about the cold there. Not sure we could handle any worse...and I agree I love a good thunder/lightening storm.. thanks!
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Old 02-16-2010, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,567 posts, read 53,011,787 times
Reputation: 18386
I moved here from New Olreans and I felt colder there sometimes than I have ever felt here. The low humidity is a blessing in both hot and cold extremes.
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Old 02-17-2010, 09:01 PM
 
Location: West Jordan
77 posts, read 240,352 times
Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayne75 View Post
I've noticed the area seems to lead the nation in air pollution?
It's doesn't lead all the time- only in spurts during the winter months because of the inversion. When I heard the "Northern Utah Tops the Country in Bad Air!!" news blitz recently I was surprised because certainly we couldn't be worse than places like LA, right? Headlines, of course, can't communicate that they really meant to say "just for today."

The most enlightening thing is to check airnow.gov frequently. It was developed by the EPA/NOAA/etc. and gives an updated, real-time air quality map and predicts the air the next day in terms of ozone and pm 2.5. And it puts everything in perspective, which is key. What you'll notice is that there are sections of the country constantly going in and out of yellow and occasionally into orange levels, especially the midwest. I only been paying attention to it for a couple months, but the only red I've seen was in Utah for 2-3 weeks in the winter. We've been yellow quite a bit since, but so have many other places in the country. Recommend y'all check out the site.

But I agree with others that when it does get bad, it is BAD.
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