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Old 05-22-2011, 05:37 PM
 
16 posts, read 32,695 times
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Its about time VIA (regional mass tansit authority) makes a leap into better transit technologies. San Antonio is the largest metropolitan area still running on only bus transit. Its been like 35 years of riding just buses that break down on a regular basis (not an exaggeration...trust me). But in the next 5 years San Antonio commuters will be able to enjoy BRT & LRT transit which is much needed. San Antonio has got to wake up and smell the delicious downtown mexican fajitas and keep on moving... dont you think!
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Old 05-22-2011, 08:59 PM
 
Location: NE San Antonio
1,642 posts, read 3,562,711 times
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I've always heard SA has one of the better bus systems in the US, but I couldn't say as I have never ridden a bus anywhere else. I would love a bullet train to Austin though
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Old 05-22-2011, 09:22 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,417,256 times
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Quote:
(not an exaggeration...trust me)
Sorry, this is C-D, TrustNo1..... Facts to back up your statement?

Why does San Antonio need to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on LRT?

The city has no huge central core, where would the LRT go from and to?

Maybe San Antonio's bus system doesn't rank very high is because the ridership is very low due to the fact San Antonio's population is automobile based.

Last edited by plwhit; 05-22-2011 at 09:31 PM..
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
4,228 posts, read 6,978,526 times
Reputation: 3521
Quote:
Originally Posted by plwhit View Post
The city has no huge central core, where would the LRT go from and to?
The most logical route would be between the outlying and central city campuses of UT, with stops at the smaller schools in between - including the medical school area.

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Old 05-23-2011, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
522 posts, read 521,449 times
Reputation: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herbrocks View Post
I've always heard SA has one of the better bus systems in the US, but I couldn't say as I have never ridden a bus anywhere else. I would love a bullet train to Austin though
Regional intercity passenger rail currently in the works:

Lone Star Rail District | Home
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
4,149 posts, read 9,326,471 times
Reputation: 3308
Quote:
Originally Posted by plwhit View Post
Sorry, this is C-D, TrustNo1..... Facts to back up your statement?

Why does San Antonio need to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on LRT?

The city has no huge central core, where would the LRT go from and to?

Maybe San Antonio's bus system doesn't rank very high is because the ridership is very low due to the fact San Antonio's population is automobile based.
Exactly!

This a simple rule of supply and demand. Supply NEVER creates demand. There may be demand by a small percentage, but not NEAR enough folks want or need this to make it worth spending millions and millions of dollars on.

Same with the bullet train to Austin everyone seems to want so badly. If we had thousands of folks commuting up there and back every day, it may be worth looking into. But we don't. The only reason to put one in would be if Austin was providing the city of San Antonio TONS and TONS of jobs, which they're not.

Would it make the trip to 6th street easier? Yeah. But I'd prefer not spending hundreds of millions of tax dollars on something just to prevent a few people from spending an hour in the car while they go get drunk.

Until there's a HUGE demand for it, it's a stupid idea to spend any money on our mass transit systems.
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:57 AM
 
1,316 posts, read 3,021,765 times
Reputation: 937
It's not about "supply or demand." It's about INVESTING in the future of America by allowing cities to be inter-connected moreso and to reduce emissions from single vehicles by supporting public transportation for the citizenry.

This is WHY we are far behind the times with our transportation system in our country; people don't think about the benefits of such a thing.

If we invest in our future and help to connect our cities with one another, you create jobs, commerce, you create life, and you connect world's together.

There are many in San Antonio who have never been to Austin (not once in their life). There are many who have never been to Dallas or Houston or San Marcos.

Is it expensive? Yeah, it is. But is it viable and necessary for our future to connect to one another through more than just the lousy system we have now in our country? Yes.

Not every city and town needs to be connected. But we sure as heck need to do a lot more to create a more connected world to one another.

Investment in a better transportation system in San Antonio and around the country can and will pay off for communities connected in many ways that can't be measured by profit margins.
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:12 AM
 
7,002 posts, read 10,283,083 times
Reputation: 5397
There is demand on Fredericksburg Rd. and other areas of the city with heavy bus ridership. A bus passes on Fredericksburg Rd. every 15 min. and the buses are still crowded.

I think LRT and BRT are apart of intelligent city planning. We know that the population is growing fast, we know that we don't have an unlimited supply of oil, and we know that traffic is going to become intolerable. Neighborhoods and business areas should be planned now with public transportation in mind. If and when it becomes too expensive to drive because of high gas prices, we'll have to wait 10 years or so for a viable public transportation system.

Has anyone ever thought that we are an automobile-based city because of the poor transportation system? The only reason why I bought a car and still keep one is because it's so hard to get around on the bus, but the gas prices and maintenance costs are becoming really expensive.

Last edited by L210; 05-23-2011 at 10:20 AM..
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:38 AM
 
486 posts, read 871,910 times
Reputation: 327
Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
There is demand on Fredericksburg Rd. and other areas of the city with heavy bus ridership. A bus passes on Fredericksburg Rd. every 15 min. and the buses are still crowded.

I think LRT and BRT are apart of intelligent city planning. We know that the population is growing fast, we know that we don't have an unlimited supply of oil, and we know that traffic is going to become intolerable. Neighborhoods and business areas should be planned now with public transportation in mind. If and when it becomes too expensive to drive because of high gas prices, we'll have to wait 10 years or so for a viable public transportation system.

Has anyone ever thought that we are an automobile-based city because of the poor transportation system? The only reason why I bought a car and still keep one is because it's so hard to get around on the bus, but the gas prices and maintenance costs are becoming really expensive.
Agree on better intra-city system, disagree about the bullet train to Austin. But let's be honest, only is dense cities like NYC public transit can be a more convenient, faster, cheaper alternative to cars. In cities like San Antonio (and for that matter 90% of the cities in this country), population (both residential areas and places or work) are so disperse that would take exorbitant investment to make it convenient enough to drive change in behavior.

I know pretty well the case of our neighboors in Monterrey, MX. Even with more density (twice the people in about the same area) and the fact that people there intensively use public transportation (buses), counldn't make their light train system really effective. The mistake? Not enough lines to make the network convenient for most people. But the investment to have enough lines was too much for them, and it would even be too much for us. Think about it: how many light train lines would we need to really connect the city? That's why buses are the way to go.
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Old 05-23-2011, 11:14 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
4,149 posts, read 9,326,471 times
Reputation: 3308
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsa210tx View Post
It's not about "supply or demand." It's about INVESTING in the future of America by allowing cities to be inter-connected moreso and to reduce emissions from single vehicles by supporting public transportation for the citizenry.

This is WHY we are far behind the times with our transportation system in our country; people don't think about the benefits of such a thing.

If we invest in our future and help to connect our cities with one another, you create jobs, commerce, you create life, and you connect world's together.

There are many in San Antonio who have never been to Austin (not once in their life). There are many who have never been to Dallas or Houston or San Marcos.

Is it expensive? Yeah, it is. But is it viable and necessary for our future to connect to one another through more than just the lousy system we have now in our country? Yes.

Not every city and town needs to be connected. But we sure as heck need to do a lot more to create a more connected world to one another.

Investment in a better transportation system in San Antonio and around the country can and will pay off for communities connected in many ways that can't be measured by profit margins.
No. It's about supply and demand. That's what makes the world run. Always has, always will.

Businesses are built on supply and demand. If you ever have your own business, you'll realize that.

Pouring millions of dollars into this system wouldn't make our city stronger. When you try to force change just because you think it's better, yet the demand isn't there, you will be left with a colossal mess.

Go take a look at Greece and their "wind power farms" that are basically big expensive graveyards for rusting windmills.

Supply and demand is very real and the base of our economy. Just because you don't believe it doesn't make it true.
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