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Old 02-12-2009, 09:08 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
2,260 posts, read 4,939,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HisLilSecret View Post
Did the ad for the position indicate that you would need to be bilingual (spanish/english) or did you ignore that part of it and apply anyway?
I wondered that too - most companies are totally upfront in their ads when hiring. If they say you need to be bilingual, they mean it.

I'm not saying speaking Spanish is bad - of course it isn't!! - but it isn't NECESSARY to know Spanish to live and be successful in San Antonio.

 
Old 02-12-2009, 08:57 PM
 
Location: snow-free city
161 posts, read 437,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
Thatís one of the reasons why I moved to San Antonio,
In Missouri I was constantly discouraged from speaking Spanish in public.
I remember I was at a baseball game with a few friends in St. Louis and I remember at least one lady turning and looking at us as if we were cursing in front of little kids.

In San Antonio, for the 1st time in 15 years I feel like I can speak Spanish in public without people looking at as if I was smoking drugs in front of them.
Hi Dopo,

I am trying to learn Spanish myself and do hope to become fluent. That is hard to do now because I don't need it on the job or at home. I am not taking a class either. Where I live, the Spanish-speakers here are mainly Puerto Rican/Domenican and I can't help but be influenced by the way they speak (which is cool, by the way ).

I am learning that the Hispanic culture has differences. This may be silly but I just don't want say something wrong/stupid to anyone in SA that is fine to say here. I hope to find a job where I can speak Spanish so it can stick.

Although we are looking forward to moving to SA, I will miss the Puerto Rican and Caribbean food/festivals/parades up here .
 
Old 02-12-2009, 09:06 PM
 
4,268 posts, read 8,355,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annken View Post
Hi Dopo,

I am trying to learn Spanish myself and do hope to become fluent. That is hard to do now because I don't need it on the job or at home. I am not taking a class either. Where I live, the Spanish-speakers here are mainly Puerto Rican/Domenican and I can't help but be influenced by the way they speak (which is cool, by the way ).

I am learning that the Hispanic culture has differences. This may be silly but I just don't want say something wrong/stupid to anyone in SA that is fine to say here. I hope to find a job where I can speak Spanish so it can stick.

Although we are looking forward to moving to SA, I will miss the Puerto Rican and Caribbean food/festivals/parades up here .
You will find Tex-Mex Spanish to be very different from PR and Cuban Spanish, but it shouldn't hinder you. You'll get used to the local "dialect."
 
Old 02-12-2009, 09:08 PM
 
4,268 posts, read 8,355,736 times
Reputation: 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by HisLilSecret View Post
Did the ad for the position indicate that you would need to be bilingual (spanish/english) or did you ignore that part of it and apply anyway?
We often require bilingual staff, and get applicants who say they are bilingual which they interpret to mean "a few words of Spanish."

(I'm nowhere near bilingual, and honestly since I have enough people around who are, I rarely try anymore, but I'm not required to. Certain positions do require it, due to the nature of the work)
 
Old 02-12-2009, 11:13 PM
 
452 posts, read 905,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaka View Post
We often require bilingual staff, and get applicants who say they are bilingual which they interpret to mean "a few words of Spanish."

(I'm nowhere near bilingual, and honestly since I have enough people around who are, I rarely try anymore, but I'm not required to. Certain positions do require it, due to the nature of the work)
I guess not being required to is a good enough reason not to bother trying, especially if you have others to do it for you. I, on the other hand, would take the opportunity to learn another language whether it was required of me or not, especially if the potential to use it is there.
 
Old 02-13-2009, 06:38 AM
 
4,268 posts, read 8,355,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HisLilSecret View Post
I guess not being required to is a good enough reason not to bother trying, especially if you have others to do it for you. I, on the other hand, would take the opportunity to learn another language whether it was required of me or not, especially if the potential to use it is there.
Well, I'm desperately working at trying to learn French, as that's the second language of my household and we intend to move to a French speaking country soon, and I continue to brush up on my Thai, so I don't lose it. I'm also trying to refresh my Karen, due to a need with refugees in other parts of Texas, but it was never very good to begin with (again, worked with enough Karen-speakers that it was better to rely on them to translate). I used to speak Spanish reasonably well when I lived in Latin America, but was never fluent. And yes, I'm being lazy. I do have the opportunity to speak Spanish almost daily in my neighborhood, and often do, but it's nowhere near the level required if I was to use it at work.

Since I'm not forced to - and I wouldn't try to convey the information I need to convey with clients with my broken Spanish, I'd rather ask someone more fluent to do so. Fortunately there are enough people around me at all times who speak Spanish that it's never a problem.

I'm actually thinking that if I stay in SA, I may try to learn Arabic, since there are not that many Arabic speakers here, but there's a real need for translators for refugees brought here. I'm not much of a polyglot though, so I doubt I'd get that far. Wishful thinking, really.

Last edited by Chaka; 02-13-2009 at 06:54 AM..
 
Old 02-13-2009, 11:41 AM
 
15,062 posts, read 19,624,248 times
Reputation: 12219
Quote:
Originally Posted by annken View Post
I am learning that the Hispanic culture has differences. This may be silly but I just don't want say something wrong/stupid to anyone in SA that is fine to say here. I hope to find a job where I can speak Spanish so it can stick.
From what I hear, there's descent size puertorican community in San Antonio (very small compared to mexicans)

Just try to talk to mexicans and ask them about their slangs.
 
Old 02-13-2009, 11:44 AM
 
15,062 posts, read 19,624,248 times
Reputation: 12219
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsawomanthing View Post
Actually when I first got here last year, I was not hired by a large company, because I was not bi lingual. Their comment was most of my employees that I would be supervising are immigrants and barely spoke English, so they wanted to know how I would be able to communicate effectively with them. I chose to answer that I would show them what I meant, and I was willing to learn Spanish and would be willing to help them with English. I still was not hired, they really wanted a bi lingual person.
Some people would say that that is BS.

But the truth is that companies hire people with qualifications that match what the company is looking for.
I've gone to many interviews and there were companies that thought I was completely unqualified and companies that told me during the interview: "We could really use a guy like you"

I speak english, spanish, some portuguese and a know a little bit of Chinese.
If that's what a company is looking for, then they would be more than happy to find a person like me.
 
Old 02-13-2009, 12:29 PM
 
43 posts, read 101,226 times
Reputation: 32
I have lived in San Antonio since 1996, I don't understand nor Speak much Spanish and I don't feel it necessary to learn either.. So the answer is Yes. You can get by here without speaking Spanish.
 
Old 02-13-2009, 01:31 PM
 
452 posts, read 905,504 times
Reputation: 356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
Some people would say that that is BS.

But the truth is that companies hire people with qualifications that match what the company is looking for.
This is true, but language is a bit much to overlook. If one of the requirements is to be able to speak a particular language, you can't "wing" it as you can with other things.
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