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Unread 03-04-2008, 09:52 AM
 
2,027 posts, read 4,464,863 times
Reputation: 603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spock's Beard View Post
We're not Dallas or Houston, and you're comparing apples to oranges. The same reason why they have a light rail is the same reason why they have football teams: They're industrious cities with a lot of financial work, so people make more. San Antonio is a tourist city who's biggest industries are service sector and medical, so across the board the average pay is lower. It's complete apples and oranges.


San Antonio cannot afford a light rail, nor does it need one. The city's tax pool is already so weak, they already pay for everything with IOU's; they probably even pay the IOU's with other IOU's too. The city wanting one is just penis-waving on the part of our elected officials trying to look like other more prosperous cities. VIA works just fine for what this city needs.
How can you say that SA doesn't need one? Every major city should have be working for better transportation. Austin (which is smaller than SA) is working on their light-rail system. San Antonio isn't a poor city anymore. The city can now afford some of the amenities that it would not have a few years back. The vote in 2000 was for a large-scale system that wasn't well planned. If a small scale starter track is voted upon, it will likely pass as current residents see the need for a more efficient transit system. And the medical field tends to pay higher wages than most others. BRAC is expected to add another 10,000 residents. San Antonio is growing and the roads can't keep up. Light-rail is better for us, and better for the enviroment.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 10:04 AM
 
361 posts, read 524,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tgannaway89 View Post
How can you say that SA doesn't need one? Every major city should have be working for better transportation. Austin (which is smaller than SA) is working on their light-rail system. San Antonio isn't a poor city anymore. The city can now afford some of the amenities that it would not have a few years back. The vote in 2000 was for a large-scale system that wasn't well planned. If a small scale starter track is voted upon, it will likely pass as current residents see the need for a more efficient transit system. And the medical field tends to pay higher wages than most others. BRAC is expected to add another 10,000 residents. San Antonio is growing and the roads can't keep up. Light-rail is better for us, and better for the enviroment.
That makes the assumption that people will use it. People don't give up their cars easily, and bus riders ride the buses where they want to go, which will be hard for a light rail. At best a light rail would replace some express buses like the 94.

Austin is also a different city than San Antonio due to the college town and politics. Different city = different needs. They're smaller in size, but more reaching into their burbs thanks to the universities than San Antonio is. In San Antonio, those who live in outlying areas have cars.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 11:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spock's Beard View Post
That makes the assumption that people will use it. People don't give up their cars easily, and bus riders ride the buses where they want to go, which will be hard for a light rail. At best a light rail would replace some express buses like the 94.

Austin is also a different city than San Antonio due to the college town and politics. Different city = different needs. They're smaller in size, but more reaching into their burbs thanks to the universities than San Antonio is. In San Antonio, those who live in outlying areas have cars.
San Antonio is very much a college town. There are over 100,000 college students in San Antonio.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 12:07 PM
 
361 posts, read 524,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tgannaway89 View Post
San Antonio is very much a college town. There are over 100,000 college students in San Antonio.
True, but not like Austin where most of the schools are in outlying areas. We have UTSA on the outskirts and that's it. Everything's located in areas where a bus line works better than a train can.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 01:16 PM
 
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San Antonio may be a college town, but theres really no reason for any of the actual students to go to Downtown. A large number of said students (well at least at Trinity) are actually SA locals who have cars. Honestly, theres just not enough of a draw to downtown to warrant it. As much as I hate to say it, downtown is mostly a tourist trap.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 01:26 PM
 
2,027 posts, read 4,464,863 times
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Originally Posted by gunadz View Post
San Antonio may be a college town, but theres really no reason for any of the actual students to go to Downtown. A large number of said students (well at least at Trinity) are actually SA locals who have cars. Honestly, theres just not enough of a draw to downtown to warrant it. As much as I hate to say it, downtown is mostly a tourist trap.
We also have one of the largest medical centers in the US as well as 2 medical centers (Stone Oak and Westover Hills) that are in the making. There are numerous ideal routes that would greatly benefit from a light-rail system.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 01:46 PM
 
31 posts, read 114,560 times
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But would there ever be enough ridership? Light rail depends on bedroom communities who have commuters that drive to a central business district. Besides, with medical professions there are alot of people who have shifts that reach into the wee hours of the morning. Unless the lightrail runs around the clock they're better off driving cars anyways.

San Antonio's layout just doesn't lend itself to light-rail. I could understand the need if there were a considerable downtown population... but from what I've seen everybody lives in the outskirts. Once SA fills in a little, I'm sure rail-based mass-transit would be a little more feasible.

Besides, didn't they just spend a whole bunch of cash on bricking the streets downtown? I'm sure people would be thrilled to pay for that to get ripped up and then reset.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 01:58 PM
 
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The cost of Bus Rapid Transit is about 1/10th the cost of light rail.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 02:04 PM
Bo
 
Location: San Antonio
14,024 posts, read 18,807,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCoyle View Post
The cost of Bus Rapid Transit is about 1/10th the cost of light rail.
Which makes it a great inexpensive way to test the concept. If it isn't successful, at least it will be a 1 million-dollar boondoggle instead of a 10 million-dollar boondoggle, or however much it costs. If it is successful, then the data can be used to justify the larger investment.
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Unread 03-04-2008, 04:30 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX (78201)
604 posts, read 1,002,776 times
Reputation: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunadz View Post
San Antonio may be a college town, but theres really no reason for any of the actual students to go to Downtown. A large number of said students (well at least at Trinity) are actually SA locals who have cars. Honestly, theres just not enough of a draw to downtown to warrant it. As much as I hate to say it, downtown is mostly a tourist trap.
Well most students @UIW supprisingly are from out of town/state/country, but even then, the ones that don't live on campus live in appartments, in most cases, no further than a mile or two from campus.

I think light rail would be good for med-long distance traveling, especially to, say, New Braunfels, San Marcos, and Austin (from here), which I believe is the proposed plan. I'll find a link to the website I saw and post it.
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